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August 01, 1947 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1947-08-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

f FLAY, AUGUST 1, 1947

F THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGEs

..

PAGR T

Katzenmeyer
Gives Lesson
To cOptimists'

Louis Meets 'Jersey' Walcott
In November 'Non-Title' Fight

Baseball's
Big Six

Brooks Trip Cards, 2-1;
Tigers-Y anks Rained Out

I-M SPOUTFOLIO

Hole-in-One
Features 'M'
Bert Katzenmeyer,
Michigan's Western

Preview
Coach
coach of
Conference;

golf champions, demonstrated
some championship form of his
own yesterday morning on the
Municipal Course for the benefit
of those hunting a few pointers to
use in the hole-in-one tourney
the Ann Arbor Optimist Club is
staging Aug. 4 .
The youthful links boss took
a total of 28 shots on the 150-
yard 16th hole, and managed to
land 16 of them on the green.
Furthermore, eight of the others
were pin-high and just a shade
off.
Seven Feet Shy
The nearest thing to the sought-
after ace came when the ball
eased to a stop 7 ft. 3 in. from the
cup, a rather acceptable drive in
any expert's game.
The Katzenmeyer exhibition
was a sneak-preview of what will
happen come Aug. 4 when en-
trants in the Optimists' tourney
line up their respective irons on
the same 16th.
40 Prizes Offered
About $400-worth in prizes is
being offered by local merchants,
25of them going to men, 10 to
women. Chairman Arthur Renzy
also has on hand five surprise
packages to present, for anything
from the day's most sensational
dub to the day's first tee-off.
k
SFETYTf FIRST
It's better to HAVE good
brakes than to WISH you
had.
All Service Guaranteed
KNOLL & ERWIN, Inc.
HUDSON GARAGE
907 North Main
Phone 7040 or 4066

NEW YORK, July 31-(P)-Jer-
sey Joe Walcott of Camden, N.J.,
will climb into the Madison
Square Garden Ring Nov. 14 to7
face Joe Louis without having, in
theory at least, a chance of lift-
ing the Heavyweight Champion's
title.
The match, announced today
by Sol Strauss, acting director
of the 20th Century Sporting
Club, is billed as a 10-round
non-title figh$, and inasmuch as
a bout must be booked for 15
rounds to be considered as a
championship fight in New
York, Walcott would seem to
be fighting only for prestige he
might attain. That, and what
is known as money.
The National Boxing Associa-
tion also recognizes only 15-round
bouts for the championship, ex-
cept in possible member states
where 15-round bouts are not per-
mitted. Prexy Abe Greene said
that should Walcott win by a kayo
no commission could deny his title
claim.
The fact that Louis would, in
the public mind at least, be con-
sidered an ex-champion were
he to be knocked. out makes it
theoretically his 24th title de-
fense.
The bout is the first of two 10-
round so-called non-title affairs
planned for Louis the coming win-
ter. The other, against an op-
ponent yet to be chosen, is sched-
uled for next March.
Walcott, a 32-year-old veteran
of the ring wars, is considered by
many as the best of the current
crop of so-called contenders.
He has had three fights this
year, defeating Joey Maxim
twice and outpointing Elmer
"Violent" Ray. He had lost
close decisions to each of these
men previously. He is a wide-
shouldered, well-muscled indi-
vidual with a fair punch and
much cleverness and know-how.
His left jab is rated among the
best in the business.

Louis last appeared in a bout
other than an exhibition when he
knocked out Tami Mauriello in
7 the first round at Yankee Stadium
Sept. 18, 1946. The dearth of ac-
ceptable opponents has kept him
idle since.
Louis, Strauss said, will start
preliminary training early in Sep-,
tember at West Baden, Ind.
Hetzeck Loses
IJunior Net
Quarter-Finals
KALAMAZOO, Mich., July 31-
(/P)--lerbert (Buddy) Behrens,
topseeded junior from Fort Laud-
erdale, Fla., was only two matches
away from . the National Junior
Tennis crown today after he went
into the semi-finals by defeating
Macdonald Mathey, Princeton,
N.J., 6-1, 6-3, in the National Jun-
ior and Boys' Tennis Champion-
ships here.
Behrens, who has tried for two
years to take the junior title
away from Herbie Flam, West
Coast star who has vacated the
championship, meets George Gen-
try, La Jolla, Calif., in a semi-
final match tomorrow
Gentry, seeded No. 8, earned his
semi-final -berth by upsetting the
Western Junior titleholder, Tony
Trabert, Cincinnati, Ohio, 6-4,
6-3 today. Trabert was seeded
fourth.
The No. 2 junior, Richard Moul-
edous, New Orleans, was matched
against unseeded and unpredict-
able Jerry De Witts of Vallejo,
Calif., who had eliminated three
seeded players in his climb to the
semi-finals.
De Witts today disposed of Alex
Hetzeck, Hamtramck, Mich., num-
ber three seeded junior, 6-1, 5-7,
6-1. Previously De Witts had beat-
en Gilbert Bogley, Chevy Chase,
Md., seeded fifth, and Canada's
champion Lorne Main, Vancouver,
B.C.

(Three leaders in each league)
G AB Pct.
Walker, Phillies 93 339 .354
Boudreau, Indians 85 304 .339
DiMaggio, Yankees 94 357 .333
Gustine, P*Eates 97 375 .331
Kell, Tigers 92 351 .331
Cooper, Giants 80 309 .324
RUNS BATTED IN
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Mize, Giants 83
Marshall, Giants 80
Cooper, Giants 77
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Williams, Red Sox 71 j
DiMaggio, Yankees 69
Henrich, Yankees 64
Doerr, Red Sox 64
HOME RUNS
lkATIONAL LEAGUE
Mize, Giants 31
Marshall, Giants 27
Kiner, Pirates 25
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Williams, Red Sox 23
Heath, Browns 20
Gordon, Indians 18
Furgol Leads
St. PaulGolf
ST. PAUL, MINN., July 31-(;P)
-A 12-foot putt that dropped on
the 18th hole for a birdie four,
swept Ed Furgol, Pontiac, Mich.,
professional into a first-day lead
in the St. Paul $10,000 Open Golf
Tournament today, with a 67, five
strokes under par for the Keller
Municipal Course.
Furgol's card was one stroke
better than those of four other
contestants who had visions of
sharing the lead.

Wh
the N
becau
ager]
don s
yester
ed a
ton,d
Th
the C
11-hi
the w
Mis
Louis

M

Reese, Lombardi Star as Dodgers Sweep;
Cleveland Home Runs Defeat Red Sox, 54
file the Detroit Tigers and beat the Brownies, 4-1, last night.
vew York Yankees were idle It was Heafner's third straight
se of rain, homers by Man- win.
Lou Boudreau and Joe Gor- Brooklyn Wins
cored all of Cleveland's runs Over in the National League,
day as the Indians complet- Brooklyn waltzed out of St. Louis
three-game sweep over Bos- with a 13-game winning streak, a
lowning the Red Sox, 54. 10-game lead and a clean sweep
Philadelphia Athletics beat of its important series with the
hicago White Sox, 3-2, on an defending champion Cardinals off
t attack. Bill Dietrich was a 2-1 victory in the finale.
inning pitcher. limited St. Pee Wee Reese, whose tenth-
to five hits as Washington inning single had nullified the
Cards' dramatic uphill surge
Wednesday night, came through
T, - with a ninth-inning triple yester-
ajor League day to score Bruce Edwards who
had singled.
Standin gS The triumph, spun by little Vic
Lombardi, who only recently was
restored to grace as a starting
AMERICAN LEAGUE pitcher, gave the Brooks their
W L Pet. GB second longest win string in his-
York 61 32 .670 .... tory. Their record of 15 was set in
on 52 43 .547 12 1924.
oit 49 43 .533 13'V2 Howie Pollet gave up ten hits
adelphia 49 48 .505 16 for the Cards and suffered his
eland 43 45 .489 171/2 ninth defeat. It was his first loss
hington 42 50 .457 20%/, to Brooklyn this season.
ago 42 56 .429 232 Giants Lose
Louis 34 59 .366 29 Grady Hatton's three-run hom-
* er in the eighth enabled the Cin-
NATIONAL LEAGUE cinnati Reds to down the New
W L Pet. GB York Giants, 8-7, while Johnny
klyn 63 36 .636 .... Mize smacked his-31st homer of
York 49 42 .538 10 the year and Walker Cooper his
Louis 51 44 .537 10 24th.
on 50 45 .526 11 "Dutch" Leonard held the Chi-
innati 47 52 .475 16 cago Cubs to five scattered hits as
;argo 44 52 .458 17 21 Philadelphia won thir third vic-
sburgh 40 56 .417 211/ tory in 16 meetings with the Cubs
adelphia 40 57 .412 22 this year, 3-0.
Boston and Pittsburgh were
rained out.

With the color and excitement
of the mid-season All-Star game
behind them, thirty-three teams
in t h r e e Intramural softball
leagues can now turn their at-
tention to the remainder of the
schedule and concentrate on the
stretch drive leading to the
championship tournament.
According to tourney director
Chuck Dailey, eight teams will
meet in the elimination event
which begins on Wednesday,
August 6. The Fraternity and
Independent Leagues will be
represented by three squads
each, while the residence halls
will send two teams to the post.
Four of the competing outfits
have already clinched tourney
berths. The Law Club and Hav-
enites are certain starters from
the Independent loop, while the
Fraternity League is sure to be
represented by Zeta Beta Tau and
Psi Upsilon.
The complete schedule:
Law Club vs. Independent
team (not selected)
ZBT vs. Residence Hall (not
selected)
Psi U vs. Residence Hall (not
selected)
Havenites vs. Fraternity (not
selected)
* * *
ALL STAR GAME SIDELIGHTS
While the Independent League
won the intramural All-Star

game Tuesday, the umpires took
the worst beating of all. The Boys
in Yellow (T-shirts) were good-
naturedly raked over the coals by
the fans on every close decision,
and the ump behind the place
must have drawn short straw to
land that job.
* * *
The game had all the trap-
pings of a big league contest--
four umpires, programs, flags
marking out the foul lines, and
an official scorer. Indeed, only
one thing was lacking--neither
President Ruthven nor Gover-
nor Dewey was there to throw
jout the first ball.
There was no Press Box at the
game, and the Daily reporter had
to stand behind the batter's cage
to watch the curves-although
there were many, many along the
sidelines-seats, that is.
SOFTBALL RESULTS
INDEPENDENT LEAGUE

New
Bost
Detr
Phil
Clev
Was
Chic
St.

4

West Lodgers 13, Foulballers
(Play-off )

FRATERNITY LEAGUE
Sigma Nu 11, Sigma Chi 6
(playoff)
RESIDENCE HALL LEAGUE
Williams 8, Wenley 7
Allen-Rumsey 13, Winchell 4
Lloyd 5, Chicago 4
Adams 7, Fletcher 2
ART CINEMA LEAGUE
Presents

Broo
New
St.
Bost
Cind
Chic
Pitts
Phil

-.-.'

" e!! |

r-I t ia. Modern G

l

1

+ Classified Advertising +

-- Through Saturday -
LIFE A PUBLIC

Read and Use
The Daily Classifieds
~ L

ABSENTEEISM:
Truman announces Controls
As .duck Production. Declines

'IT'S CREW-CUT TIME'
Be you flat, round, or square
headed - we'll design one to
fit your Personality. 8 bar-
bers - No waiting. Fan-
cooled! Tonsorial queries in-
vited!
The Daseola Barbers
Between State and
Michigan Theatres

Prices
25c until 5 p.m.
30c after 5 p.m.
-- Friday and Saturday -
BRIAN DONLEVY
in
"THE BEGINNING
OF THE END"
Also --
JUDY CANOVA
in
"SINGING IN THE CORN"

WASHINGTON, July 31-(P-
The government today sharply
restricted the open season and bag
limits on duck hunting, decreeing
an average of 30 days shooting in
the east and 35 in the central and
western states. The curtailment
reflects a marked decline in the
waterfowl population and poor
breeding conditions along the mi-
gratory routes.
Last year the country's average
open season was 45 days. It was
80 in 1945.
Limit Set
This year's daily bag limit on
ducks was set at four, as compared
with seven last year and 10 in
THE L. G. IJALFOUR>
STORE
"Your Official Jewelers"
Open every day -
Monday through Friday
1:30 until 5:00
Home of the Official ?
University of Michigan ring
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
1319 S. University Ph. 9533
y? ::.;, :;.,_.;" {:;'.i................:-{ '-?$ ::;:? Tt;;-x:; ii't

1945. The limit on the number of
ducks a hunter may have in his
possession was set at eight, com-
pared with 14 last year and 20 the
year before.
Shooting hours generally fall
within the period of sunrise to
sunset with some specific excep-
tions for certain types of fowl.
Opening dates vary according
to states. The fish and wildlife
service said that the states, which
have the option of splitting their
season, have already decided this
matter individually.
Today's regulations, issued by
President Truman, are remini-
scent of the big duck depression
of the mid-30's. They also cover
various other wildfowl.
Population Drops
A January estimate put the wa-
terfowl population at 54,000,000, a
decline of 26,000,000'from the 1946
estimate.
The 1943 estimate was 126,000,-
000. This has been reduced, in part
because of hunters returning from
the war and because of an easing
of the wartime shortage of am-
munition and other hunting
equipment. Hunting license sales
have boomed in recent years.

MISCELLANEOUS
ALTERATIONS, custom-made clothes,
remodeling of clothes. Prompt serv-
ice. Hildegarde Shop, 116 E. Huron.
Phone 2-4669.
PERSONAL
WILL THE PERSON with the "77"
Iowa auto license number please
phone the person you met from
same locality on Monday evening.
Phone 6282. ) 32
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: Young woman desiring ride
to Montana on or about August 30.
Contact Apt. 8, 816 Tappan St. )16
STUDENT COUPLE desire ride to Flor-
ida after Aug. 15. Will share driving
and expenses. Contact us: 1465 Uni-
versity Terrace, Apt. 1336. )18
FLORIDA STUDENT desires ride to.
Tampa area. Share expenses, driving.
Would like to leave Aug. 16-18. Call
Dave Wright 2-3256. )28
WANTED
BOARDING home for 2 year old Jap-
anese American boy. Phone 20382. )14
TWO TICKETS to Carmen. Any per-
formance. Phone 28254. )43
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Green plastic raincoat Sunday
at Martha Cook Tennis Court.
Please call 4750 in evening. )17
LOST-8 or 9 keys on a string. Please
phone 4121, Extension 393. )36
LOST-Brown leather billfold contain-
.ing I.D. and Reserve cards at Wil-
low Run Village. Return to J. C.
Weitekamp, Dorm 1, Rm. 111, Willow
Run Village. Reward. )23
LOST: Sheaffer mechanical pencil.
Black with gold band. Lost any-
where between Angell or University
Halls and East University bus stop,
or on bus itself. Treasured keepsake.
Contact or write J. Chvala, West
Lodge, Reward. )30
LOST-Swiss Watch from neck chain,
blue cloisonne, between Rackham
Building and Marshall's Drug Store.
Keepsake. Reward. Phone 4121, Ext.
2137 or 26368 after 10 p.m. )45
LOST-Raincoat left in car of student
from Genoa, Ohio by hitchiker. Please
contact 4401 or 7603. )42
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Sold, Rented Repaired
STUDENT & OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

SWAP-Boston-Ann Arbor. Available
Sept., 4 room furnished apartment
short distance M.I.T., Harvard. Want-
ed: 2 bedroom aparment Ann Arbor
or vicinity. Write S. E. Cleveland,
36 Myrtle St., Boston, Mass. )40
WANTED TO RENT
VETERAN GRADUATE STUDENT de-
sires quiet single or double room fall
semester. Write Box 7, Michigan
Daily. )31
MALE STUDENT desires room this
fall. Will pay full semester in ad-
vance. Preferably near campus. Rob-
ert Stratton, 2-4401, Rm. 12, Adams
House. )11
MALE STUDENT desires a room, pre-
ferably single, starting in fall. Please
phone Dan Dunbar, 207 Winchell,
2-4401 evenings. 15
TEACHING FELLOW and employed
wife need apartment. Call Mrs.
Bond, 4121 Ext. 2299 during day,
2-6779 evenings. )27
TWO WOMEN grad students, neat re-
fined, would like furnished apt. by
fall or end of summer session. Please
call 6552. )39
MY MOMMIE and I would like lodg-
ings in Ann Arbor beginning with
the fa]l term of this year. Mommie
is a war widow and I am a four-
year-old boy. Mommie wants to com-
plete her education so that we may
be more certain of our future. Can
you help us? Reply Box 8, Michi-
gan Daily. )38
FOR SALE
SPECIAL VALUE white oxford cloth
shirts-button-down collar $3.00. All
sizes. Also white sport shirts. Phone
8768. )74
RALEIGH 3-SPEED BICYCLE with
built-in hub genterator, basket and
attached lock. Good condition. Any
reasonable offer. Paul Chester, 337
E. William St., Telephone 5671. )35
BEAUTIFUL YOUNG PARAKEETS and
Canaries. Bird supplies and cages.
562 South 7th Street, Phone 5330. )93
ARGUS C-3 CAMERA complete with
case and accessories. Call Ypsi 3596-
J5 or write R. L. Weiss, 1086 Goshen
Court, Willow Run. )98
MOUTON LAMB winter coat. Prac-
tically new. Phone 7907 after 6 p.m.
) 24
NEW BAUCH & LOMB Binocular mic-
roscope. Call 6746, Alexander. )33
1942 INDIAN--45, mileage 15,000. $350.
417 E. Liberty, call after 5:00 p.m. )44
1942 SCHULT Housetrailer; 21 feet,
sleeps four completely equipped.
Price $1950.00 R. H. Copithorn, Sel-
lecks Trailer Park, Ypsilanti. )89
NEW UNIVERSAL portable typewriter
with adjustable stand. Used four
months. Price $75.00. 1372 Hanover
Ct., Willow Village, Phone Y-3058J3.
) 41

Continuous from 1 P.M.
ALWAYS COOL!

4

-- Today and Saturday
YOU'l Love It!
I- -

LIONEL BARRYMORE
James CRAIG ' Lucile BREMER
! Also I
"GOOFY GOLF"
Snapshots - News
Coming Sunday
"BUCK PRIVATES
COME HOME"

HILL AUDITORIUM
Box Office Open 3 P.M. Daily
Admission 45c (tax incl.)
Tickets, Phone 4121, Et. 479
-- - Also - --
"CHILDREN
MUST LA UG H",

30-Minute Short produced
in Pre-War Poland by Jew-
ish Socialist Bund on Cam-
paign for Health and against
Prejudice in Ghetto.

WANTED TO TRADE

Sunday
"MIRACLE ON
34th STREET"

i

I

p

5he l
74 66izale4 cVIA h
'Round the Corner on State
HALF YEAR eI Lv.

VI

I '"i

Begins oday!
Just twice a year we have a sale like this. A clean sweep of all

I

spring and sumrner stock at drastic reductions
of

WHITE
BLOUSES
Chic you, in this all
white tailored beauty .. .
french cuffs too, for
ultra rich styling.
5.05

a i. v
Diamonds
..d
Wedding V
Le Rings
717 North University Ave.
l i p : - --

15 COATS
Toppers fitted and belt-
ed styles. Black and
colors originally $39.95
to $59.95. Sizes 10-44.
Now $19.95 and $25.00

'2

SUITS .

Mostly wool in colors.
Originally
$29.95 to $49.95
Now $14.98 to $25.00

and More
of Original Price

Read and Use

Daily Classifed Ads

DRESSES
Prints and plain colors in jersey, crepe, sheers, spun rayon. Sizes
9-15, 10-44, 1672 to 241/2. Original prices from $10.95 to $35.00.
Two groups of cottons and rayons at $3.98-$5.00.

=711

THE INTER -COOPERATIVE COUNCIL
PRESENTS
SINCLAIR LEWIS'

PLAYSU ITS
SUNSU ITS
PINAFORES
Sizes 9-16.

Groups of Skirts, Sweat-
ers, both cottons and
, c C P . Ii mac

Handbags at $2.98 -
$3.98 and $5.00. Were
.n 4n -I? 9S

1 11
li' AR iR. n N\A 11 rug

I

I

iim

! 1

3

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