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August 21, 1946 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1946-08-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-THE MICH-IGAN D~AY

Ruthyen,

Coaches,

Old

Playe rs

Grieve

Yost's

Death

:>,

President Alexander G. Ruthven,
members of the Michigan coaching
staff, and former players were deeply
grieved by the death yesterday of
the legendary Fielding H. Yost.
"Mr. Yost fully merited the affec-
tionate title which he has carried for
many years as the "Grand Old Man"
of football," said President Ruthven.
"Among the other contributions
which he made to the well-being of
young people was a splendid athlet-
ic plant at the University which was
designed and finished under his di-
reetion at no expense to the state.
He was always an influence for good
and an inspiration for young people;
no man ever made a larger number of
personal friends."
Ken Doherty, Michigan track
coach, extolled the former Michi-
gan athletic director for his interest
In, all forms of inter-collegiate

sport. "I know that progress in
track, for instance, would not have
been possible here without the en-
thusiastic support and sincere in-
terest of Mr. Yost," Doherty said.
Ernie McCoy, now assistant athletic
director to Fritz Crisler said, "We've
lost a great man. He's done a great
job of not only coaching, but teach-
ing sportsmanship and all that goes
with it. It's hard to replace a man
of his stature."
Matt Mann, who has led Michigan
to the top of collegiate swimming
circles, first came here in 1924 at the
request of Mr. Yost. "He's the most
wonderful man I've ever worked for,
Mann said. "It was a privilege to
work for him-he was like a father;
he was a real guy."
Willie Heston, Michigan's first
and probably greatest All-American
and one of Fielding Yost's earliest

and favorite football pupils, de-
clared it "Was almost like losing
a father" when he heard of "Hur-
ry Up's" passing.
"I had just returned from Grand
Rapids,' he said, "and I heard the
news on the radio about 9:00 in the
evening. It was quite a shock, of
course."
The great half-back said he would
come to Ann Arbor today to visit his
old coach's family.
Heston declared there were too
many experiences he wanted to tell
in connection with the 'Old Man.'
"You would have to put out an extra
edition for them alone," he added.
"Fielding Harris caused a great
many boys to lead a better life
than they would if they had not
come under his influence," he con,-
tinued. "He helped many finan-

cially, even after they were out of
college.
"I know he loaned me some money
just after I had been married and
was trying to get started in a law
practice. Dan McDugin (Yost's bro-
ther-in-law) told him I needed it,
and he advanced me the money, re-
fusing to take a note, or anything
else, in return."
The former All-American said that
Fielding Yost had been interested not
only in varsity athletics but in all
boys. "He wanted to make sports'
available to everyone."
Johnny Maulbetsch, Michigan
All-American in 1914, the half-
back who could run full speed un-
der tables, expressed extreme re-
gret last night over the loss of
Fielding Yost. He said:
"t'here are so many things I could
mention, it is hard to make a begin-

ning. It seems that finally the cur-
tain of darkness has, been drawn
for the three great musketeers of
Michigan athletics, Charley Baird,
Keene Fitzpatrick, and now Fielding
Yost.
"In the passing of our great coach,
I would like to say that we who have
played for him always considered
him to be a leader of the highest
type, and the advice he so freely
gave is remembered and followed by
his many pupils.
One outstanding phrase he often
used was "never let up on this play
and tend to forget it in readying
yourself for the next, because one
never knows what will happen that
far away--therefore give all you
have on this play as it may be the
one that will win the game.
"He not only preached these words;
he has put them into his own deeds.

Ih41P Ediam
1 s Unes
717 Nor-th University A

I shall long remember him and be
thankful to have been able to be
one of his many, many friends. Like
all other Michigan men I regret the
loss of the old coach and leader."

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'Mr. Michigan's'

Career

Ends After
(Continued from Page 1)
versity of West Virginia. It was there
that he saw his first football game;
in fact, he played in it.
"It was againt Geneva College,"
he reminisced in one of his last
interviews. "We bought our own uni-
forms, rule books and even a bottle of
witchhazel to rub down with. The
only eligibility rule we had in those
days was that you had to be bright
enough to find the field."
The six-foot 195-pound newcomer
took over the guard slot in his first
competition. "I stole the ball six
times from the Geneva fullback,'
Yost used to chuckle. "Then we
scored two or three touchdowns on
them."
Football's future immortal tacti-
cian received his first lessons in
strategy from Doggy Trenchard,
the Mountaineer coach and ex-
Princeton star. The lessons were
continued under Dink Davis of La-
fayette when he transferred there
the next year.
In this eastern institution Yost
performed his initial bit of football
wizardry. It came on the week-end
when little Lafayette upset mighty
Pennsylvania for the first time in
history. The Quakers at that time
were proving invincible with their
famous "guards back" play, the "T"
formation revolution of its day.
Yost noticed early in the game
that the Quaker strategy narrowed
the five-man line. He found that by
cutting in from his tackle position he
could snare the ball handler in the
rear of his interference. This piece
of gridiron deduction collapsed the
Penn power-house.
Following his Lafayette career,
Yost became connected with one of
the most renowned football aggre-
gations in the history of the sport,
the Allegheny Athletic Club, where
-he played alongside such all-time
greats as Pudge Heffelfinger and
Biffy Lea. An old Allegheny coach,
O. D. Thompson caught sight of
him there, and was so impressed
that he recommended him to Ohio
Wesleyan authorities who were
scouting for a grid mentor.
The rookie coach celebrated his
first season by capturing the Buck-
eye state crown, Wesleyan defeating
Ohio State in the final game, 6-0,
Yost's first introduction to a future
bitter rival. Next year, 1898, found
Yost at Nebraska; again his eleven
wona league championship, the Mis-
souri Valley title. In 1899 the maker
of champions went to Kansas, where
for the third straight year Yost-
coached elevens took first place hon-
ors; the Jayhawks won the Valley
crown.
At the, turn of the century Yost
traveled west-and struck gold. His
teams in 1900 won no less than four
championships. The Stanford varsity
defeated California for the Coast
title; the Indian frosh won the con-
ference crown; San Jose Normal,
coached by Yost in odd moments,
took the Normal school league; and
Time Out for
RELAXATION
ti~J (

Enjoy your vacation be-
tween terms in a cool, com-
fortable sport shirt of rayon

75

Years

Lowell high school, which the tire-
less mentor took charge of in
the morning, copped the state pre
laurels.
In 1901 Yost came to Michigan.
What followed is football legend.
He arrived in Ann Arbor a com-
plete stranger one morning, and
strolled into the office of Gradu-
ate Manager Charles Baird and
introduced himself. "Young man,"
the manager gravely intoned, "you-
've got a big job ahead of you.
You've got to beat Chicago."
The year before the Maroons,
Michigan's keenest rival in the old
days, had handed the Wolverines
a very sound setback. Wolverines
wanted revenge. Yost gave it to
them, and was their idol ever after-
ward.
From 1901 to 1905 Yost and Mich-
igan wrote gridiron history. They
trampled their way to 54 consecutive
victories, scoring 2,281 points to 42
for their opponents. That "point-a-
minute" pace has never since been
equalled by any football team.
This was the' tradition that passed
away yesterday,.-
A'S Whip Newhouser
PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 20-(I)-
Bob Savage held the Detroit Tigers
to three hits tonight to pitch the
Philadelphia Phillies to a 2 to 0 shu-
out over Hal Newhouser before 13,-
893. Elmer Valo scored both Athletic
runs after he had walked in the first
and seventh innings.

'Nation's Loss'-Crisler
OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. 20.-
P) -The death of FieldingaH.
Yost, retired football coach and
athletic director at the University
of Michigan, was termed today
by Herbert 0. (Fritz) Crisler, the
man who succeeded Yost in both
positions, "not only an irreparable
loss to Michigan but a loss to the
nation."
Crisler was informed of his
predecessor's death by a telegram
delivered to him as he- lectured to
a football class at the Oklahoma
State Coaches Association's an-
nual clinic. After reading the wire
he resumed his discussions with-
out announcing its contents.
Later he described Yost as "not
only a coach and athletic director
but an institution."
"He contributed greatly to the
heritage of athletics left by the
late Charley Baird, Michigan's
first director of athletics," Crisler
added. "The high conception these
two men had of inter-collegiate
athletics will live forever."

Pittsburgh Pirates Repudiate
Murphy's Guild by 15-3 Vote

PITTSBURGH, Aug. 20.-Members
of the Pittsburgh Pirates team, today
rejected the American Baseball Guild
in baseball's first collective bargain-
ing election by a 15 to 3 vote.
Nineteen of 31 eligible Pirate play-
ers voted in the election conducted
by the Pennsylvania Labor Relations
Board and one of the votes was chal-
lenged.
10 Players Absent
Ten Players did not appear at the
polling place and two eligible to vote
were not available because theywere
out of the city.
The challenged vote was that of
rookie Leroy Jarvis. The challenge
was made by the labor board until
it was determined whether Jarvis had
been on the club payroll long enough
since July 16, the day the list was
submitted.

Players in the city who did not
vote included Edson Bahr, illy Cox,
Ken Gables, Al Gearhauser, Al Gion-
friddo, Frank Gustine, Lee Handley,
Al Lopez, Bill Salkeld and Burgess
Whitehead.
Chance for Challenge
Murphy has ten days to challenge
the election -- a challenge he un-
doubtedly will accept.
Murphy, chewing a cigar, took his
defeat calmly, saying:
"The result came as no surprise to
me since I've said within the last
couple of days-off the record-the
Guild couldn't possibly win.."
Although Murphy was outwardly
calm, ahastily scribbledstatement
which he handed to the press took
an angrier view of things.

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Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Boston...... .
New York ......
Detroit ........
Washington
Cleveland .....
Chicago .......
St. Louis ......
Philadelphia

W
83
67
64
58
56
53
50
36

L
36
49
50
60
62
64
65
81

Pct.
.697
.578
.561
.491
.475
.452
.435
.308

GB
14%/
161/
24 /
26 /
29
31
46

W
Brooklyn.......70
St. Louis .......69
Chicago .......61
Boston. . .... '55
Cincinnati ... 51
New York .... 50
Philadelphia .. 47
Pittsburgh . ... 45

L
44
44
52
55
63
63
64
63

Pct.
.614
.611.
.549
.500
.447
.442
.423
.417

GB
. . .2
8
13
19
212
212
22

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 9, New York 2
St. Louis 1, 5; Boston 5, 4
Philadelphia 2, Detroit 0
Washington 5, Cleveland 4

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 10, Brooklyn 0
St. Louis 4, Boston 1
New York 4, Cincinnati 3
Chicago 5, 10; Philadelphia 2, 2

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