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August 03, 1946 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1946-08-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Barclay, Rog
Kessler Start
State Golf Play
Special To The Daily
PORT HURON, Aug. 2-Wolverine
golf coach Bill Barclay carded a 74
first round score here today to lead
the Ann Arbor delegation in the first:
day of the Michigan Open Golf
Championships at Black River Coun-
try Club.
Roger Kessler, one of Barclay's
mainstays on last season's M'ichigan
squad, was just behind with a 75.
Kessler is fresh from a victory in the
Detroit Junior Championships where
he defeated Bob Zinn of Red Run in
a 19-hole match one up.
Other Ann Arbor scores were:f
William Ramsey, 76, and Howard
Slocum, 85.
The lowest score of the day was
garnered by Frank Walsh of Detroit
with a 67, five under par. Jimmy
Johnson and Horton Smith, both
from the motor City, were close with
69 each.
Gil Evans 5th in AAU
Gil Evans, University of Mich-
igan diver and member of last
season's swim team, took fifth
place yesterday in the three meter
event of the National AAU cham-
pionships. Bruce Harlan, NATTC',
Jacksonville, won with 189.24.
Muller Anderson of Ohio State
was second with 182.28.

Chi Phi, Vets Housing
Cop Titles; 3 Houses Tie
Rumsey, Tyler, Prescott Deadlock; Bob
Bussler, Bill Powers Vie in Golf Finals

AIDS THE SPIANS:
Cooper, Repertory Star, Tells
Of Iribulations In 'Big Time'

v7

Chi Phi and Vets Housing have
cinched first place honors in the Fra-
ternity and Independent leagues,
while Rumsey, Tyler, and Prescott
have finished the Residence Hall
schedule in a deadlock for the top
spot, Howard Leibee revealed yester-
day.
The Chi Phi's had a perfect season
record of six cosecutive victories,
furnishing them a safe margin, over
second place Sigma Alpha Epsilon,
'who won four and lost two. The Vets
also have an undefeated string of
four straight, assuring them of first
place, but two games remain on their
schedule.
No Play-Off
Rumsey, Tyler, and Prescott each
have a record of five wins and two
losses. They have decided not to stage
a play-off to determine an eventual
lone winner.
Thus, five of the six teams who will
engage in an all-campus tournament
between the fraternities and resi-
dence halls have been decided. Beside
Chi Phi and SAE, another Greek-
letter team must win a spot. It will
probably be either Sigma Chi or Del-,
ta Tau Delta.
Competition in the Faculty League
has only included two games to date,

FOR THE RECORD..
By JACK MARTIN, Daily Sports Editor

but Leibee declared the league
championship will be decided next
Tuesday when the undefeated Chem-
istry nine meets the English depart-
ment.
Golf Finals Carded
Semi-finals have been concluded in
the intramural golf tournament, and
the final matches will be held the
first of next week to determine the
four flight champions.
Bob Bussler, the ranking favorite,
defeated Dick Savage 3-2 to gain the
Championship Flight finals against
William Powers, who nipped Doug
Beath one up.
William Peet trounced John Page
4-3, and J. J. Benavie overcame Gil
Westa 7-6; to earn the opposing slots
in the Wolverine Flight. In the Maize
division, Don McKee, winner over
Dale Stollsteimer 4-3, will meet Frank
Morgan, who defeated R. Germain
3-2.
John Givin will face Fred Robie in
the Blue finals. Givin and Robie had
close semi-final matches, the former
nipping Cecil Sink one up and Robie
slipping by Fred McMahon by the
same margin.
* * *
Net Quarter-Finals Held
Eight men blasted their way into
the intramural singles tennis quarter-
finals this week; they will play the
semi-finals matches next week.
J. S. Rowbury will face Cameron
Meredith, Abraham Medwed plays
Maohamed Makzoumi, John Swan-
son clashes with Abe Goldman, and
Goodwin Ginsburg opposes Arthur
Rezny.
The doubles semi-finals have been
finished, and the Abd Traboulsi-
Phillipe Roulier combination will
tangle with Bill Culman and John
Swanson for the title sometime next
week.
That 160,000 persons have se-
cured tickets to see the Michigan
football team play two games next
fall was assured yesterday when
the Ohio State ticket office re-
vealed the Wolverine - Buckeye
tussle there had been sold out. The
Michigan-Army game was an-
nounced as a sell-out two days
ago.
MajorA LEAGue
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

British; Troops
Tel Aviv After

Leave
Search

WATERMELON DISTRIBUTION HELD UP -- Upwards of sixty truck-
loads of ripened watermelons wait in ninety degree heat at Rush
Springs, Okla., as a shortage of freight cars caused a tie-up in shipment
of the perishable crop, valued at thousands of dollars. Railroad officials,
promising early relief for the angry farmer-shippers, blamed the crisis
on heavy livestock shinments to market.

TWO MILLION BUCKS:
Pittsburgh Paper Says Pirates
Sold to Indianapolis Banker

Hal Cooper, iho is playing the lead
role of Mr. N nningham in "Angel
Street," descril )ed yesterday the ef-
forts of youn g actors and of play-
wrights in th e ir attempts to "make
Broadway."
"Actors join unions to exhibit their
ability before Broadway producers
and directorsi in union .playhouses
for amateursi," Cooper said. This
gives actors the opportunity to de-
monstrate ab'i ity and is much better
than walking 'into an office and tell-
ing somebody ryou can act."
"Equity Lilx'ary Shows" sponsored
by John Goldin, one of New York's
foremost and icldest producers, is such
an opportuni'-
Qi CC
Jewits Police
Nab "Terrorist

BOB NUSSBAUMER'S contract ad-
ventures have been practically a
continued story in the newspapers
lately. In the latest installment, writ-
ten just a few days ago, the former
Wolverine football, baseball, and
track star pledged his services to
Green Bay's pigskin Packers.
The previous chapter had ended;
the day before with the rather bald
announcement from Philadelphia
that the feeble Phillies had relin-
quished all rights to their rookie out-
fielder. A foot-note, in small print,
at the bottom of the page, added
that the $15,000 bonus awarded to
Nuss had a little string attached and
that the string had been pulled. The
$15,000 was to come in bits by terms
of the contract, and some of the bits
didn't come through.
Now, an unofficial Eastern cor-
respondent of The Daily has ap-
pended a post-script to the tale.
It seems, says this source, that
Nussbaumer did not see one penny
of the $15,000 bonus. He was given
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Small tan leather pouch con-
taining money and important keys
Friday. Reward. Phone 4121, Ext.
2137. (21
LOST: Locket. Gold, heart-shaped
with small design. No chain. Re-
ward. Phone 2-7438. (20
LOST: Brown alligator zipper note-
book. Reward for return of note-
book or notes. Leave at University
High School Office or Education
Office. (18
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: Car to buy outright or
hire from August to September.
Apply Dadachanji, 921 South State
or phone 2-4634. (9
MISCELLANEOUS
RESTRINGING elswhere Nylon $4.50.
Tournament gut $9.00. My price
$3.00 and $7.00. Dean McClusky,
phone 2-7360. (16
PLAN for your fall suits and formals
now. Expert workmanship on cus-
tom-made clothes and alterations.
Hildegarde Shop, 116 E. Huron.
Phone 2-4669. (10
MEN'S USED CLOTHES wanted. A'
better price paid. Sam's Store. 122
E. Washington St. (4
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 20 acres timber on Zeeb
Road. Inquire 5055 W. Liberty Rd.
(19
FOR SALE: Royal Portable Type-
writer. Good condition. Call Mrs.
Hernandez, 2-2521, ext. 279 before
4:30 p.m. (15

his unconditional release just one
day before he was scheduled to
receive the money. The ex-Michi-
gan outfielder came within 24 hours
of the fabulous pile but wasn't in
time to grab the smallest pebble.
The whole story has not been told,
but enough of it has become evident
to provide a blasting condemnation
of the contract policies of some Big
League baseball teams.
T° BOB Nussbaumer, like most col-
lege students, $15,000 is a lot of
money. And when a chance comes
along that brings such a sum out of
the clouds into reality, a man would
be rated a dunce not to take ad-
antage of it. So Nuss took it.
But the fine print included the
word "conditional;" and the big
time boys have a tendency to gloss
over such an ominous sounding
phrase. It is not illegal, certainly.
And probably, in the minds of the
diamond moguls, there is not the
least thought of questionable ethics.
But in many cases that one un-
stressed conditional clause has
ruined the hopes and ambitions of
excellent athletes.
Nussbaumer had one year of com-
petition left at Michigan. If he had
not signed a professional contract,
he would have had an additional
season in which to train and develop
his baseball or football form. This,
however, would be outweighed by the
fact of $15,000-if the receipt of that
money were a certainty. No certain-
ty was present for Nuss. And now
he has neither the $15,000 or his in-
valuable amateur status.
T RUE, he has signed with the
Packers. But baseball is Nuss'
first love, and he will never be as
satisfied playing football as he would
with a bat in his hand. The condi-
tional clause has slipped behind him
and tapped him gently on the back.
If a Big League baseball team
thinks a college player is good
enough to warrant the offering of
bonus payments in return for his
signature, they should be willing to
live up to the spirit of the agree-
ment and pay the athlete at least
part of the sum, regardless of what
happens, as a partial recompense
for the loss of his amateur status.
In concrete terms, Bob Nussbaum-
er should have" been guaranteed
something, besides a temporary
salary, for giving up his still-
flourishing college career.

By The Associated Press
PITTSBURGH, Aug. 2-The Pitts-
burgh' Post-Gazette said in a front
page story tonight it had "learned
definitely" the Pittsburgh Pirates
baseball club has been sold to Frank
E. McKinney, Indianapolis banker
and part owner of the Indianapolis
club of the American Association.
Informed the Post-Gazette had
said the Dreyfuss family, after near-
ly half century ownership, has agreed
to sell to McKinney, William E.
Benswanger, Pirate president, snap-
ped: "It has not."
The newspaper said a joint an-
nouncement by Benswanger, repre-
senting Mrs. Florence Dreyfuss, ma-
jority stockholder, and McKinney
will come the later part of next week.
The purchase price was reported "in
the neighborhood of $2,250,000."
Tigers Win, Yanks Lose
DETROIT, Aug. 2- Rattling 13
hits off Tex Hughson and Jim Bag-
by, the Detroit Tigers slapped down
the league-leading Boston Red Sox
7 to 1 today as Paul (Dizzy) Trout
pitched a scintillating five-hitter.
Birdie Tebbetts' double scored Dick
Wakefield who had singled, in the
second inning and the Tigers bunch-
ed three singles for another run in
the third and three more hits for a
pair of tallies in the fifth.
CLEVELAND, Aug. 2-Allie Rey-
nolds turned the New York Yankees
back with two hits tonight as Cleve-

land's Indians won a 3 to 0 victory
in the opening of a three-game ser-
ies.
Big League Field Day?
NEW YORK, Aug. 2-What prob-
ably has been the dream of many a
baseball fan-to stack the National
League against the American right
down the line from pace-setter to
tail-ender-may come true if' the
Major League club-owners approve a
proposal drafted today by player del-
egates from each National League'
team.
This plan, designed to raise funds
for a player pension pool, would set
aside an early day each July on
which the rival league teams would
be matched on the basis of the July
I standings.
Last Day Today
DAKOTA
with John Wayne
and
SMOOTH AS SILK
Sunday and Monday
MISS SUSIE SLAGLE'S
with Veronica Lake, Sonny Tufts
and
,GAY BLADES

JERUSALErM, Aug. 2-()--Police
announced ;tonight the arrest of
Itzhak Yesternitsky, described as the
No.. 2 man in the terrorist Stern gang,
and British' troops wound up their
four-day house-to-house search of
Tel Aviv.
Yesternit, ky was spotted by a
police serge,!ant through a disguise
of thick eyjeglasses and, heavy beard
during a r o utine screening. Also ar-
rested, it iwas reported, was Anna
Stern, sister of the late Abraham
Stern who j was founder of the gang
as a dissijient element of another
Jewish uniderground organization,
Irgun Zva i Leumi. It was believed
Anna Ster n was detained for ques-
tioning oaly, and that she was not
on the lisit of wanted Palestine ter-
rorists.
Baernar'd Heller To Lead
Discus sion of Palestine
"Unres t in Palestine" will be the
subject WE a forum discussion at 8:15
p.m. Sunday in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre, it was announced yesterday.
Rabbi,' Bernard Heller, Ph.D., form-
er director of Hillel Fotindation, will
give th e principal talk. He is the
author t of the popular book, "The
Odyssey of A Faith."
His lecture will be followed. by dis-
cussio.i of Prof. Preston Slosson . of
the history department and Prof
Clark 1 Hopkins, of the archeology
department.

Golden tries to improve theatre
art, and to better working condi-
tions for actors and other connected
with the theatre, Cooper declared.
He attempts to get other New York
producers and directors interested
in his projects, and in his tryout sys-
tem for young actors. These shows
help directors too, Cooper said. It
saves them the time and the bother
of hunting up young actors who can
do small parts in their plays.
The "Equity Library Shows" are
non-profit and are paid for out of
Golden's pocket. The plays continue
at the rate of three per week, ten
months of the year, Cooper said. The
plays cost a. iinimum of $75.
Another of Golden's projects de-
signed to help young actors is a two
week tryout, Cooper said. "Anyone
can write Mr. Golden a letter and he
will arrange an appointment. For
two weeks straight, he does nothing
but sit and watch actors do parts
for him.
"Of course it is tremendously com-
petitive," Cooper said, "but the top
two or three people are guaranteed
parts in his next play-if they are
types that he can use."
Playwrights sometimes gather a
few actors, rent a little theatre for
a few nights and will give shows to
which they invite a number of pros-
pective backers. Most of these shows
flop, Cooper said. but actors will take
parts anyway because it is a means
of exhibiting ability.
Cooper has had experience in play-
production and radio classes here at
the University, on stage and radio
in New York, and in the Navy.
He was Albert, "the dastardly ne-
phew," in "Ladies in Retirement,"
and appeared in many other pro-
ductions here. He did the lead in
"The Last Mile,,' a documentary play
against capital punishment by John
Wexley at one of the Equity shows in
New York. This is a famous play,
Cooper said, both Spencer Tracy and
Clark Gable were discovered after
doing this part.
Pianist To Give Recital
Betty Jean Ruser, pianist, will pre-
sent a recital in partial fulfillment of
the requirements for the degree of
Master of Music at 8:30 p.m. today
in Rackham Assembly Hall.
The program will include Bach's
"Toccata in F Sharp minor," Haydn's
"Sonata in E flat miajor," Almand's
"Sonata No.. 1," and Brahms' "Vari-
ations and Fugue on a Theme by
Handel."

W
Brooklyn.......60
St. Louis .......57
Chicago ........52
Cincinnati ....47
Boston ........ 45
New York .... 44
Philadelphia .. 40
Pittsburgh .... 38
YESTERDAY'S

L
38
40
43
49
49
55
53
57

Pet.
.612
.594
.547
.490
.479
.444
.430
.400

GB
2
6
12
13
161/
17
20 2

Comfortably Weekdays
COOL! _30c 'til 5
LAST DAY TO DAY!
Terrorized by Their Own LOVE! l
JOHN HODIAK NANCY GUILD
with
Lloyd Nolan Richard Conte

RESULTS

Pittsburgh 6, 2; New York 0, 3
Brooklyn 3, Cincinnati 2
Philadelphia 3, St. Louis 2
Boston, Chicago, Postponed.
AMEICAN LEAGUE

It.

III

W
Boston ........ 70
DE''ROIT 57
New York .58
Washington .. 51
Cleveland ....49
St. Louis......43
Chicago.......40
Philadelphia .. 29
YESTERDAY'S

L Pct. GB
31 .693 ...
41 .582 11a
42 .580 12
48 .515 17 /
52 .485 21
55 ..439 25
59 .404 28 /
69 .296 39
RESULTS

DANCING at the Famous
Blue cLanter'n Dance Pavilion
to BUDDY BRUCE and Orchestra
THURSDAY THROUGH SUNDAY - Starting at 9 P.M.
RESTAURANT and REFRESHMENTS
ISLAND LAKE - 2 Miles East of Brighton on U.S. 16

I

* STARTS SU NDAY!

a

Detroit 7, Boston 1
Cleveland 3, New York 0
Washington 6, Chicago 0
Philadelphia 8, St. Louis 3

I
T

The University Musical Society Presents

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ti

A1A
North Main Opposite Court House
STARTS TODAY
RETURNED BY POPULAR
REQUEST
GENE TIERNEY IN
"THE RETURN OF FRANK
JAMES"
Plus
TYRONE POWER AS
"JESSE JAMES"

IRO

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and

B

BE

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N RECITAL FOR TWO PIANOS

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er ectiaa -in Moaern Coo

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.UrGo.8'

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~8:30 P.M

HILL.AUDITORIUM

Starting TODAY!

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