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July 28, 1945 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-07-28

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SATURDAY, JUL ,1945

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

........... . . . - -- -- . . ... . ....... - .. ................ . .. - ----------- . . ...... ...... . ........... . . ............... . . ... . ..... ............ ....... . .......... . ....

SPORTS
NEWS +VIEWS+COMMENT
By BILL MULLENDORE, Daily Sports Editor
YESTERDAY, WE DISCUSSED at some length the matter of member-
ship in the Western Conference. Out of that matter comes another
natural topic for some thought-the rules for.eligibility of individual athletes
representing any one of the ten Conference schools.
Before enrolling at this University, we had the same idea common,
unfortunately, to a large section of the public that Michigan, like
(we thought) most other large institutions which place some little
emphasis on athletics, was practically on a professional basis. We
had fancy notions of athletic scholarships, grand recruiting methods,
substitutes to individuals, and all that goes with that phase of
athletics which definitely does exis in some places.
For three years now, we have been gradually unlearning that notion.
And, after reading over the provisions made by the Western Conference
governing body, we can see that such practices simply could not exist
here, even if they weer desired.
A UNIVERSITY OR COLLEGE that becomes a member of the Big Ten
must live up to certain rules and regulations laid down by the men who
control it. In the first place, all intercollegiate athletics must come under
the complete control of the faculty of the university, who see to it that
the rules of eligibility are enrorced.
In brief, those rules may be summarized as follows: In order to be
eligible, a candidate for an athletic team must complete one year of
residence in college work, thus limiting actual competition to three years.
Graduate students are ineligible. Candidates must be amateurs in every
sense of the word, and must not at any time be delinquent in scholarship.
Recruiting of candidates is very sharply limited, and no discrimination is
allowed either for or against athletes in the way of scholarships, loans,
employment, etc.
These rules, we understand, are rigidly enforced during normal
times. Over the war period, of course, most of the restrictions have
been let down as far as eligibility is concerned, although the rules
against subsidies and recruiting are still in effect. Only recently, as a
matter of fact, this latter set of regulations have been considerably
revised, on the side of greater strictness.
FOR OUR OWN PART, we have never seen any evidence at Michigan
pointing to violation of any of the rules regarding subsidies and recruit-
ing. Athletes are eligible for academic scholarships, but no athletic schol-
arships, as such, are available. Only three men on Michigan athletic
teams have held the attractive Rackham Scholarships, for example, since
those scholarships were made available. And all three won them for scho-
lastic, not athletic, merit.
So, it would seem that the cry against Michigan as prelyting, subsi-
dizing school where the boys "play for pay" is not exactly in line with the
truth. As has been pointed out, the rules of the Conference forbid such
activity, even if the University chose to engage in such activity-and, as
far as we know, it doesn't. For that matter, a school with Michigan's
prestige in the athletic' world should never have to resort to these practices1
anyway. Athletes who want to make a name for themselves will naturally
graviate to these places where the best of coaching and experience is
available. And Michigan definitely does have both to offer.

CAN H E COME BACK?
Detroit Fats Still Hopeful
For Hank's Future Success

BY HERB RUSKIN
Recently the U. S. Army saw fit
to discharge Hank Greenberg, De-
troit Tiger outfielder, after four years
of service.
The big question that was on ev-
erybody's lips was "would Hank come
back to the team he left that after-
nocn in May, 1941?" At this time
another question could be posed. "If
he did come back, would he still be
the same as when he left, or would
those four years change him to a
shadow of his former great self?"
The first of these questions has
been answered in the affirmative,
but the second must remain unan-
swered until some future date when
more information will be available.
Started with Beaumont
Henry Greenberg was born in the
Bronx, New York, some 34 years ago.
He became the property of the De-
troit club in the early 1930's and was
farmed out to Beaumont in the Tex-
as League. Coming up, he gained the
starting first baseman's position.
Major League Standings]

Hank played this position with the
pennant winning teams of 1934 and
1935.
The acquisition of Rudy York, big
Indian first sacker, made it neces-
sary for one of the two to sit on the
bench or to change positions. York
tried various other positions, butwas
not too successful in any of them.
It was then that Greenberg made his
famous switch to the outfield. Again
such questions as "would he suc-
ceed?" were asked. Hank answered
them by doing as well if not better
in his new position.
58 Homers in 1939
It was during the season of 1939
as many fansdwill remember, that
Greenberg made his famous try to
break Ruth's60 homeruns inyone
seal-on. He did not break the record,
but he came within two of tying it.
Then came the Selective Service
Act and the call of the leading Tiger.
Hank left the Tigers in May, 1941 as
a private in the United States Army.
He came back as a captain after hav-
ing served for four long lears. He
was stationed for a time down in
Panama and in the China-Burma-
India theater.
Fans' Favorite
Big Hank Greenberg has always
been a favorite of the Tiger fans, es-
pecially the younger generation.
There are many reasons for his pop-
ularity among the people who watch
-him play. Perhaps one of these is
friendliness he shows toward the
fans. I don't mean toward each sep-
arate person, but toward the fans as
a whole.
Right now Hank's batting average
is not where it could or should be.
The four years away from baseball
have taken their toll. I am sure,
however, that all Detroit fans are
pulling for the big slugger and they
are confident of his success in once
again reaching the heights where he
once ruled the Detroit baseball
world.

Mayo Homers
In Last Inning;
Tigers Win, 1-0
Newhouser Wins Slab
Duel With Humphries
DETROIT, July 27 -A)- Eddie
Mayo broke up a scoreless pitcher's
battle in the ninth inning today with
a home run that gave the American
League leading Detroit Tigers a 1 to
0 victory over the Chicago White Sox
in the opener of a three-game series.
Victim of Mayo's game-winning
belt into the lower deck in right field
was righthander Johnny Humphries,
who had yielded but two hits up to
that point. Hal Newhouser, who gave
nine hits,avoided intermittent trou-
ble to post his 16th victory against
six losses.
Chicago had runners on base in
every inning, but Detroit catcher Bob
Swift threw out four of them steal-
ing. The Tigers didn't have a man
past first base until Mayo smacked
the game-wrecking homer, his sixth
of the season.
Ferriss Beaten, :J4
BOSTON, July 27 -UP)- For the
second time this season Dave Ferris
couldn't get beyond the eight-straight
winning streak today as the Wash-
ington Senators bunched four hits
in the eighth to beat the Boston Red
Sox 3 to 1.
The game was on ice for the visit-
ors when, in addition to the bunched
hits, the Sox missed three successive
chancesto retire the Senators after
two were out.

GridPicture Clearing Up
As 4th Week's Drills End

22 Men Fight It Out
For Starting Berths

As week number four of the sum- holding down end positions, and
mer practice session of the Wolverine Gene Hinton and Al Wahl are as-
grad squad came to a close yesterday, pirants for tackle berths.
the problem of selecting a starting Leading the field in the halfback
eleven for the opening tussle with department are Pete Elliott, Warren
Great Lakes, on September 15, be- Bentz, and .Walt Taninga.
came less complex. Bob Callahan, former Missouri
Head Coach "Fritz" Chisler had center, is again working out, al-
narrowed the field down to approx- though he is not in good enough
imately two teams. Although no condition to engage in scrimmage.
position, with the exception of Bob, who has just returned from a
Iquarterback, is sewed up at pres- .tonsillectomy, is working out at
ent, the outstanding prospects have tackle. Another member just off
been weeded out and the picture the sick list, Dan Dworsky of Sioux
has cleared up considerably. Yet, Falls, South Dakota, is trying out
the return of a few players who fer fullback.
have recoveredfron injuries, and The boys shed their shoulder pads
the possibility ef others returning and jerseys for the signal drill at
in the fall still leaves the fight for th~e start of practice. After running
starting assignments wide open. through the various lineand pass
The only definite starter is, of plays, the Blue team took the offen-
course, Captain Joe Ponsetto, who sive in a scrimmage that ended the
will be back at his signal calling post. day's work. The second apd third
Harold Watts, who played center last string blue teams alternated with the
year, appears to have the inside track White squad in providing the defens-
in that department, while John Lin- ive opposition.

AMERICAN LEAGUE
TEAMS W L Pet.
Detroit ...........48 36 .571
Washington ......45 39 .536
New York ........44 40 .524
Chicago..........44 424.512
Boston...........4 42 .512
*St. Louis .........41 40 .506
*Cleveland ........40 43 .482
Philadelphia ......30 54 .357
NATIONAL LEAGUE
TEAMS W L Pct.
Chicago ..........55 32 .362
*St. Louis .........51 38 .573
Brooklyn .........50 39 .562
*Pittsburgh .......48 43 .527
*New York ........47 45 .511
Cincinnati ........40 44 .476
Boston..........41 48 .561
*Philadelphia......25 68 .269

GB
3
4
5
5
512
71/
18
GB
5
6
9
10%/
131/
15
33

NIGHT GAMES
AMERICAN LEAGUE
St. Louis......000001 000-1 9 0
Cleveland......011 000 01x-3 8 0
Potter and Mancuso.
Gromek and Hayes.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
New York . .000 000 000 00-0 3 0
Philadelphia 000 000 000 02-2 7 1
11 innings
Voiselle and Kluttz.
"udd and Seminick.
Pittsburgh .....000 000 000-0 3 0
St. Louis ......000 000 20x-2 3 0
Roe and Salkeld.
Donnelly and Rice.

*Does not include night games.

Borowy Going to Cubs

BUY MORE BONDS
Keep A-head of Your Hair"
Bob, our new porter, says, "I'll
give you the best shine in Ann
Arbor."
The Dascola Barbers
Between Mich. and State Theatres

Entries for the qualifying rounds
of the Trueblood Cup tournament
will be accepted today, Golf Coach
Bill Barclay announced yesterday,
as the last qualifying play will,
take place tomorrow.Undergrad-
uates in the University who are
not members of the varsity should
register at the University Golf
Course.

By The Associated Press
BLOOMFIELD, N. J., July, 27-
Hank Borowy, New York Yankee
pitcher who was sold to the Chicago
Cubs today, said he probably would
join the National League leaders
Sunday.
"It came as a great surprise to me,"
said the former Fordham ace. "First
thing I heard about it was after to-
day's game when Larry MacPhail
told me the news. He said Joe Mc-
Carthy knew all about the deal be-
fore he went back to Buffalo.
"I hate to leave the Yankees and

the American League where I have
spent all my big league career but
that's baseball. I'd like to think it
over for a little bit but I probably
will go to Chicago sometime tomor-
row.
In order for the Cubs to secure the
former Fordham University star, the
Yankees had to get waivers from all
American League clubs. The pur-
chase price was unannounced, but
obviously was many times the $7,500
waiver price.

COME TO

You

Always

Save at

MARSHALL'S and WITHAM'S

235 South State, Next to State Theatre

605 South Forest, Cor. S. University

DRUG SAVINGS

8 oz. Calamine Lotion.
16 oz. Alcohol 70%... .
100 Aspirins, 5 gr. .. .
75c Doans Pills......

.. 29c
.. 13c
. . . . . . 5c
.35c

50c Dr. Lyons ...........21c
50c Tek Tooth Brushes 2 for 51c_
$1.25 Nutrex ..............98c
1/2 gal. Mineral Oil (Macy's) 89c
LISTEN TO STATION WPAG
"The Trading Post of the Air"
12:30 to 12:45 P.M. Daily except Sunday

COSMETICS
TOI LETRI ES
REVLON
MAX FACTOR
YARDLEY
AYERS
BLANCHARD
25c Cuticura
Soap, 2 for 25c

COSMETIC SAVINGS
$1.00 Skol . ..... ..........79c
$1.00 Pacquins .......... .. .79c
$1.00 W ildroot .............79c
$1.00 Kreml Tonic ..........79c
$1.00 Countess Maritza
Leg-Film, Special ......59c
$1.38 Lady Esther Cream... .98c
50c Conti Shampoo .........39c
A NEW PUBLIC SERVICE
Starting Friday, July 27
at 12:30 P.M. over Radio Station WPAG
"THE VETERAN'S PROGRAM"

I

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State
Ministers: Dr. James Brett Kenna
Rev. Robert H. Jongeward
Mark W. Bills, Summer Director
Mary McCall Stubbins, Organist
9:30 A.M.: Student class, Wesley Foundation
Lounge.
10:40 A.M.: Church School for children - Nur-
sery through sixth grade.
10:40 A.M.: Worship Service.
Sermon : "Riches in Rags" by Dr. Kenna
6:00 P.M.: Wesleyan Guild. "For What Are
We Learning?"
By Prof. Wesley Maurer.
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
The Rev. A. Shrady Hill, Curate.
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by Mr. Hill.
11:00 A.M.: Nursery and Kindergarten, Tat-
lock Hall.
5:00 P.M.: Canterbury Club (students and
servicemen) meeting at the Student Center,
408 Lawrence St. Picnic supper. Speaker.
During the Week
Tuesday, 10:00 A.M.: Holy Communion, War
Shrine
Wednesday, 7:15 A.M.: Holy Communion (fol-
lower by breakfast at Student Center. Res-
ervations, tel. 5790.)
Friday, 4:00 - 6:00 P.M.: Open House, Student
Center.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H.Loucks, Minister and Student
Counselor
Ruth McMaster, Associate Student Counselor
ROGER WILLIAMS GUILD HOUSE
502 East Huron
Saturday, July 28-
1:00 P.M.: Guild members will leave the Guild
House for Pinebrook Farm.
7:10 P.M.: Choir rehearsal in the Church.
8:30 P.M.: Open House at the Guild House.
Sunday, July 29-
10:00 A.M.: Study class continues its study of
Mark.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship in the Church.
5:00 P.M.: Rev. Eugene Zendt will speak to the
Guild on "Love and Marriage."
6:00 P.M.: Cost supper.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Rev. Alfred Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 11:00: Service, with sermon by the
pastor, "Earnestly Contending for the Faith."
Sunday at 5:15: Supper meeting of Gamma
Delta, Lutheran Student Club. If the weather
is pleasant, the supper will be outdoors.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.

PRESCRI PTIQNS
Filled exactly as your Doctor orders at
MARSHALL'S and WITHAM'S

We stock

Parke - Lilly - U pjohn's - Lederle - Squibb -

Merck's - Pharmaceuticals and Chemicals

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