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August 04, 1945 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1945-08-04

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SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1945

THE MT!C:TTTf". A N D A TYX

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Intra- Squad

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SPORTS
NEWS + VIEWS + COMMENT
y BILL MULLENDORE, Daily Sports Editor
According to the won and lost records, the two best pitchers in baseball
this year are Dave (Boo) Ferriss of the Boston Red Sox and Harold New-
houser of the Detroit Tigers. Each has won 17 games, while Ferriss has
lost four and Newhouser six. The race to the 20-game mark, and to the
30 for that matter, between these two hurlers should be interesting to.
watch.
There is not much to choose between the two. Feri'iss, being a first-year
man, has gained the most publicity. Great things were taken for granted
from Newhouser, who hung up 29 triumphs last season.
But if a choice had to be made, the edge undoubtedly would rest
with the Tiger southpaw, simply because he has to work about twice
as hard to win a ball game as does Ferriss. The Red Sox have the
hardest-hitting outfit in the American League; Detroit is one of the
three weakest at the plate in all baseball. A Tiger pitcher has to be
good to win.
Four of Newhouser's triumphs have been extra-inning duels, and seven
have been one-run decisions. On at least four occasions he has won his
game with his own bat. On very few outings has he had more than a two-
run lead to work on. He has pitched in relief roles, with insufficient rest,
and out of turn. For more than a month he carried the major share
of the Tiger pitching burden on his own shoulders. That he has stood
up under it all is a great tribute, not only to his pitching skill but to his
physical stamina.
All this is not meant to deprecate Mr. Ferriss, who is as fine a pitching
prospect as the Majors have seen in some time. But Ferriss is a rookie,
and rookies have a bad habit of folding up after a good season or two.
His true claim to greatness cannot be judged for several years.
Meanwhile, the Tigers have another hurler on their staff who
certainly merits more notice than he has been getting. That man is
Al Benton, he of the broken ankle and the phenomenal earned-run
average. At last reports, Benton had won ten and lost two, while
giving up just 11 earned runs, an average of 0.89 per game. Five of
the games were shutouts. And that, friends, is pitching with a capital
"P.",
.' Of Benton's two defeats, one was a 1-0 shutout in which he gave
up just five hits and an unearned run. The other occurred in an abbre-
viated six-inning tilt in which the opposition bunched three scratch hits, a
walk, and an error to score three runs in the first inning before none were
out. Benton retired the next 18 men in order, but his mates could tally
only twice.
A few years ago, Benton was a Philadelphia Athletic castoff, a
seven-inning pitcher." Connie Mack had let him go, and Connie sup-
posedly never made a mistake. Benton spent his first years in Detroit
uniform as a relief pitcher, and did all right at it by dint of excellent
control and a good fast ball. Then lie was promoted to a starting assign-t
ment, and was making good in his new role, when the Navy claimed him.f
During his years as a sailor, Benton picked up a curve ball some- t
place, and that curve ball has transformed him from an ordinary pitch-.
er into a potentially great one. Where he used to rely on his speed in a
jam, he now makes use of his hook, one of the best in the business.
( And in a year when American League hitters aren't doing much t
against any kind of pitching, that good curve has been devastating. t
Benton won't lead the league in games won this year, mainly becauser
he was out for six weeks with a broken ankle. But he has a very goodt
chance to top all pitchers in the earned run average column. And, after
all, what can be a more accurate test of a hurler's worth than his ability
to keep the opposition from crossing the plate?

Played Toda
Practise Game Ufrs
Preview of '45 Season
Oosterbaan, Martineau, Munn, and Valpey
In Charge; Crisler Attends Coaches Meeting

STILL POPULAR-Bob Feller, Cleveland's former American League leading pitcher (now Chief Specialist
Feller, USN), autographs a baseball for one of his fell ow Sailors while others wait their turn to obtain the
coveted signature. Bob, who has been in the service for three years, is now pitching a pretty good brand of
baseball for the Great Lakes Naval Training Station nine. In a recent game, he twirled a no hitter against

By MARY LU HEATH
Michigan's gridders begin the
windup of their summer practice at
2:30 p. m. EWT (1:30 p. m. CWT)
today at the stadium as they engages
in the first of two intra-squad games
scheduled for the final week of the
current series of drills.
Half to Play
Although the length of today's
game will be determined by the
weather, at least half of the squad
members will get a chance to parti-
cipate in the contest, which will be
repeated in next Saturday's summer
practice finale. Both games are open
to the public.
In the absence of Head Coach H.
0. (Fritz) Crisler, the teams will be
handled by assistant coaches "Big-
gie" Munn, Bennie Oosterbaan, Earl
Martineau,and Art Valpey. Crisler
left Thursday to attend a two-day
meeting of Big Ten coaches and offi-
cials.
Probable Starters
Although the starting lineups are
still in doubt, a tentative roster of
the Blues, or first-stringers, shows,

either Ed McNeill or Don Hershberg-
er at left end, George Johnson or
Bob Callahan at left tackle, Dominic
Tomasi or Joe Soboleski at left guard,
Harry Watts and Anton Momsen at
center, Stu Wilkins or John Lintol
at right guard, Jim Rehberger, Gene
Hinton, or Al Wahl at right tackle,
and Ed Bahlow or Ed Brunsting at
right end.
The backfield combination will
probably consist of Capt. Joe Pon-
setto or Howard Yerges at quarter-
back, Walt Teninga or Pete Elliot at
left half, Warren Bentz or Hank
Fonde at right half, and Jim Foltz
or George Chiames at fullback.
JV's Represented
The White, or junior varsity squad,
will probably find John Carroll start-
ing at left end, Stan Kuick at left
tackle, Jack Smith at left guard. Bob
Swanson at center, Cecil Freihofer at
right guard, Bob Johnson at right
tackle, Ed Grenkoski at right end,
Howard Doty at quarter, Wesley
Mueller and Leonard Dovalovsky at
the halfbacks, and Richard Davis at
the fullback post.

the Ford All-Stars of Dearborn.
Two Eliminated
In Golf Tourney
Wolford and Weeman
Win Opening Matches
Although the Trueblood Cup golf
tourney is only in its third day, two
men have been eliminated from the
competition.
The matches played to date have
brought together^ Bob Wolford and
Alden Johnson, and Kirk Weeman
and Bob Stuckwick, with Wolford
and Weeman coming out on the vic-
torious end. Pete Elliot, a Navy train-
ee, and Hank Zimmerman, drew a
bye for the first round in this match
play contest.
The tournament, which is open
only to undergraduates, is played in
honor of Thomas C. Trueblood, the
first man ever to coach golf at Michi-
gan.
The purpose of the tournament is
to select the best undergraduate golf-
er on campus this summer. However,
the winner of this tourney will also
have a good chance of becoming a
member of the regular golf team.
With the qualifying round andI
two of the matches already played.
the scores are not too impressive.,
The men competing for the cup, and
the honor attached to winning it,
have been shooting in the low 80's
and the high 70%s.
August 28 is the day when the
winner of the contest will be an-
ncunced. With 16 men playing, eight
will be left on August 5. These men
will then play off, and by the 12th
of this month only four golfers will
be in the running. The week end-
ing August 19 will have seen two
more competitors eliminated; and
August 28 will be the big day for
one of the 14 men still in the tourna-
ment, as the victor will be announced
at that time.
Bridges' Goal,:
2.00 Victories

By Herbert Ruskin
That the first sport to be of-
ficially recognized by the Michigan
authorities was cricket. In 1865, the
Board of Regents gave $50 for the
care of a, cricket field. The next year
the amount was raised to $100. The
Pioneer Club, which consisted of
eight officers and 25 men, had been
formed in 1860. Previous to recog-
nition by the Regents, they had
played their games on State Street,
in Ann Arbor.
. . . That the most points a Wol-
verine grid squad has ever had
scored against it was 58. This game
occurred in 1891. and it was played
against Cornell. Michigan scored 12
points in this game. Later that same
season, the Maize and Blue again
met Cornell, losing this time by a
score of 10-0.
. . . That the football squad has
played 87 different teams since its
beginning in 1879. These games.
range from many one-game series#
to a 41-game series with the Buck-
eyes from Ohio State.
That this will be Michigan's
first meeting with Army. However.
Michigan has met Navy four times
and holds a record of two games won,
one lost ,and one tied.
M. S. C. Line
Coach Very IIl
Condition of Joe Holsinger, line
coach of Michigan State College's
football team, who has been critically
ill in University Hospital after a ma-
jor operation, was reported "slightly
improved" by hospital authorities
yesterday.
Holsinger is onetof Coach Charlie
Bachman's staff at Michigan State
and is known throughout the Mid-
West for his traditionally strong for-
ward walls. He has missed the major
portion of Spartan summer grid drills.
Michigan State will renew its foot-
ball series with Michigan Sept. 22,
here, after a two-year lapse.

Major League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

TEAMS
Chicago. .
St. Louis .
Brooklyn
New York
Pittsburgh
Cincinnati
Boston ...

w
.. 59
........56
54 ..54
.. .. . 50
.42
........43

L
33
41
40
47
49
54
70

Pet.
.641
.577
.574
.520
.515
.462
.443
.271

1
i
1
1:
3

Philadelphia......26

FRIDAY'S RESULTS
Brooklyn 5-3, Boston 1-5.
Chicago 11-9, Cincinnati 5-1.
St. Louis 5, Pittsburgh 1.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
TEAM W L Pet.

GB
5 t%
5%
11
[1111
[614
19
35
GB
412
5
7
9
0.2
23%*, 1

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

Detroit ..........53
Washington ......49
New York ........48
Boston ...........47
Cleveland ........45
Chicago.........45
St. Louis .........42
Philadelphia ......30

36 .596
414.544
41 .539
44 .516
45 .500
46 .495
46 .477
60 .333

1

SAT., AUG. 4, 1945
Eastern War Time
7:00-News.
7:05-Songs by Rudy Check
:.5-Sleepy Head Serenade
8:00-News.
8:15-1050 Club.
8:30-Breakfast Melodies.
8:45-Bouquet for Today.
8:55-Musical Interlude,
9:00-News.
9:05-Music Box.
9:30-Little Show.
9:45-Lean Back & Listen.
10:00-News.
10:05-David Rose & Orch.
10:15-What Do You Know.
10:30--Broadway Melodies.
10:40-Women Today.
10:45--Waltz Time.
11:00--News.

11:05-Kiddies Party.
11:30-Farm & Home Hour
12:00-News.
12:15-Jesse Crawford.
12:20-Merle Pitt.
12:25-College & Martial
Airs.
12:30-Trading Post.
12:45-Man on the Street.
1:00-News.
1:05-Salon Music.
1:10-Dick Gilbert.
1:15-U. of M.
1:30-Mitch Ayres.
1:45-Phil Hanna.
1:55-Today's Hit Tune.
2:00-News.
2:05-John Kirby.
2:15-Jerry Wald.
2:45--Fireside Quartet.
3:00--News.
3:05-Vincent Ross.

3:15-Bob Crosby.
3:30-Band Music.
3:45-Baseball Brevities.
3:55-Baseball (Det. at
Chi.)
6 :00--News.
6:15-Albert Wallace.
6:30-Telephone Quiz.
6:45-Flashes From Life.
6:55-Piano Interlude.
7:00-News.
7:15-Fireside Harmonies.
7:25--Popular Music.
7:30-Front Page Drama;
7:45-Evening Serenade.
8:00-News.
8:05-Dance Time.
8:15-Put & Take It.
8:30-Your American Mu-
sic.
9:00-News.
9:05--Woody Herman.

] FRIDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 5, Detroit 0.
New York 4, Philadelphia 1.
St. Louis 6, Cleveland 5.
Washington 7, Boston 3.

Illy

BACK TO THE TEPEE:
Gene Desautels Is Discharged
By Marines; Plays for Indians

t
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9

COME 1710d
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH :
120 South State
Ministers: Dr. James Brett Kenna
Rev. Robert H. Jongeward
Mark W. Bills, Summer Director
Mary McCall Stubbins, Organist
9.30 A.M.: Student class, Wesley Foundation
10:40 A.M.: Church School for children - Nur-
sery through sixth grade.
10:40 A.M.: Worship Service.
Sermon: "Dusty Highway," by Dr. Kenna
6:00 P.M.: Wesleyon Guild. "Religion and the
India Problem."

__ -____ -.A

Another name was added last week
to the ever-growing list of discharged
veterans Qf World War II, who have
come back to play ball for their for-
mer Major League owners, when
Gene Desautels received his honor-
able discharge from the Marine
Corps.
The 38-year-old ex-big leaguer has
left Parris Island, South Carolina,
and will join the Cleveland Indians
in time to be put in service against
the White Sox in the current series.

Desautels has been playing fairly
regularly while in service and is in
good enough condition to resume his
old catcher's position.
Gene was one of the mnainstays
of pre-war Red Sox ball clubs before
he was traded, in 1942, to the In-
dians. His reappearance will help
Manager Lou Boudreau considerably.
Desautels' return is further proof
of the fact that discharged veterans
are going to play a bigger and big-
ger part in Major League ball from
now on. Other pre-war stars who
have returned and are now helping
their respective teams in the pen-
nant races are Hank Greenberg and
Al Benton of the Detroit Tigers, and
Red Ruffing of the Yanks.

WASHINGTON, Aug. 3 --P)-- At
38, Tommy Bridges has one partic-
ular ambition, he wants to return to

the big leagues at least long enough
to win eight more games, bringing I get out I'd like to join the select
his grand total to 200. circle of 200-game winners," he said,
Before his induction into the Army Still -trim at about his normal
20 months ago, the graying Detroit weight of 160 pounds, this star of
righthander won 192 games for the three World Series, 1934, 1935 and
Detroit Tigers with whom he spent 1940 (four won, one lost), and two
14 consecutive seasons. All-Star games, gets in a little base-
"I haven't any idea how much ; ball as pitcher-outfielder'for the Of-
longer I'll be in the service, but when fice of Strategic Services.

Yl- ectiox 4 Modern Opmlika

3

NOW
TLOVE SET TO MUSIC
.. AND FUN
FOR ALL!
Jane POWELL
Ralph BELLAMY
Constance MOORE
Morton GOULD
ALSO
CARTOON
ODDITY
NEWS
SUNDAY
"VALLEY OF DECISION"

: .!

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CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

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LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Left in Women's League, 2nd
floor washroom, white gold wrist-
watch. Finder please call 2-2986 or
Un. Ex. 505. Reward.
LOST: Woman's Elgin wrist watch
between Nickels Arcade and Forest
Ave., Sat., the 28th. Reward.
Phone 22539.
WANTED
APARTMENT: Will sublet furnished
3-room apartment near campus
Aug. 4 thru Sept. 1. Call 7078.
WANTED: Student kitchen help,
dinner hour; meals or cash. Rate
.70 per hour. Call 6737, 1109 E.
Huron.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Single room at Wood
League House, one-half block from
Campus, 725 Haven.

-Np-

Where
Quality
and
Comfort

ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
The Rev. A. Shrady Hill, Curate,
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion
11:00 A.M.: Holy Communion and Sermon by I
Mr. Hill.
11:00 A.M.: Nursery and Kindergarten, Patlock
Hall
5:00 P.M.: Canterbury Club (students and ser-
vicemen) meet at the Student Center, 408
Lawrence St. to go to Mr. Weber's farm.
During the week:
Monday, "Transfiguration" 7:15 A.M. Holy Com-
munion
Tuesday, 10:00 A.M. Holy Communion. War
Shrine.
Wednesday, 7:15 A.M.: Holy Communion follow-
ed by breakfast at the Student Center. Res-
ervations phone 5790.
Friday, 4:00 - 6:00 P.M.: Open house at Student
Center.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
'512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student
Counselor
Ruth MgMaster, Associate Student Counselor
ROGER WILLIAMS GUILD HOUSE
502 East Huron
Saturday, August 4
8:30 P.M.:- Roger' Williams Guild Open House
Sunday, August 5
10:00 -AM.:: Bible Study. class in the Guild House
1:00 A.M.: (Morning Worship. Rev. C. H. Loucks
5:00- P.M.! Roger Williamsr Guild. Kiss Gail
.Absel wh'bas, recently returned from India
wtill speak to 'the _group.
6:Oq P.M. Cost Supper.
FIFKST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
Aug. 5:-, Love.
10:30 A.M.: Lesson sermon.
11:45 AXM.: Sunday School.
8:00 'P. M. Wednesday evening testimonial
meeting.
This church maintains a free Reading Room
at 706 - Wnverine Tdg. Washington at Piirth

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
W. P. Lemon, D.D., and James Van Pernis,
Ministers.
Frieda Op't Holt Vogan, Director of Music
E. Gertrude Campbell, Director of Religious
Education
10:45 A.M.: Church School Summer Session for
Beginner-Nursery, Primary, Junior and Inter-
mediate departments,
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Dr. Lemon's ser-
mon will be "The Reversal of Human Judg-
ment."
5:00 P.M.: Summer Vespers at which Dean J. B.
Edmonson of the School of Education will
speak on "Hopes and Fears Concerning Com-
pulsory Military Training in Peace Time."
Supper will be served.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
sponsored jointly by
Zion and Trinity Lutheran Churches
Zion Lutheran Church-
E. Washington St. at S. Fifth Ave.
9:00 A.M.: Service in the German language.
10:30 A.M.: English Worship Service.
Sermons by Rev. E. C. Stellhorn
Trinity Lutheran Church-
E. William St. at S. Fifth Ave.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service.
Sermon by Rev. Henry O. Yoder
Lutheran Student Association-
309 E. Washington St.
4:15 P.M.: Meet at the Parish Hall and leave
from there to join the Congregational and
Disciple Guild at Riverside Park for an out-
door meeting.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister: Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Director of Student Work: Rev. H. L. Pickerill
Assistant Director: Miss Bobbie Simonton
Choir Director: Leonard V. Meretta
Organist: Howard R. Chase
(Eastern War Time)
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Rev. .H. L. Pickerill
will give the sermon, his subject being,
"Creative Living.".
4:00 P.M.: The Congregational-Disciples Stu-
dent Guild will have a joint meeting with the
Lutheran Group at Riverside-Park,

'l

Meet'

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DELICIOUS ALLENEL DINNERS perk up appetites.
laded by sultry summer heat Enioy aood food and

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Miss Janet Wilson, Organist.
Mrs. Claude Winder, Church School Supt,
Monday evening: Unitarian Student and Gradu-
ate s groups will attend the -IRA lecture fea-
turing Mr. Robert Haydon and Prof. Martha
Colby, following Which refreshment and dis-
cussion will be had at the Unitarian Parson

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