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August 12, 1944 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1944-08-12

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DAY, AUGUl7ST 12, 14 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAE4

I '

A ircraft
By WHITNEY MARTIN
NEW YORK, Aug. 11-(P)---Every-
thing is being organized alphabetic-
ally these days, it seems. We have
the A, A. U., the C. I. 0., the A. F.
of L., the B. P. 0. E., the A. W. 0. L.
and whatnot, so it's only natural for
a new group to grab a handful of
letters and come up with a fancy
name.
The new organization is the A. A.
A. B. A., or briefly, the All American
Amateur Baseball Association, and
it was formed at a meeting here last
February with Glenn L. Martin, the

Execu tit
big bomber man, a leading instigat-
or. Mr. Martin, an amateur sports
enthusiast, also is probably the big-
gest baseball operator. He owns 23
uniformed teams, all amateur in the
strictest sense and made up of em-
ployes of his Middle River, Mo.,
plant.
Charley Swan, one of his execu-
tives, dropped in with Bill Derwin
of Waterbury, Conn., to tell us of
the plans of the A. A. A., etc.
"We don't want to conflict with
the National Amateur Baseball As-+
sociation, which has been in exist-
ence since 1913," he explained. "But1

Forms Amateur

Baseball Loop

we thought a purely Eastern associa-
tion would be better from our stand-
point. Amateur teams can't travel
far to tournaments because they are
amateur teams, andlast year in the
National Association tournament at
Youngstown, Ohio, only two Eastern
towns were represented.
"We'd like to work in harmony
with the National Association, with
the champion of our Eastern tourna-
ment, which will be held in Balti-
more Sept. 7-12, meeting the winner
of the National Association tourna-
ment in a world series. Maybe even-
tually a third association can be

formed on the West Coast and the
three winners meet in a sort of tri-
angular world series.
"So far we have 10 communities
with organized amateur baseball rep-
resented. They are Waterbury, Bal-
timore, Elmira, N. Y.; Zanesville,
Ohio; Butler, Pa.; Philadelphia, Mid-
dle River, Md.; Bux-Mont County,
Pa.; Washington, D. C. and Elkton,
Md., Atlantic City and Richmond
have applied for membership, and
we have had feelers from Schenec-
tady, Buffalo, Utica, Rochester and
Kingston, N. Y.; York and Wilkes-
Barre, Pa.; Springfield, Boston and

Cambridge, Mass.; Greenwich, Conn.;
Cumberland and Hagerstown, Md.,
Greenville, S. C., and Charlotte, N.
C."
Mr. Swan says the whole setup is
without taint of commercialism. No-
body makes nothin', in other words.
"After all," he says, "Mr. Martin is
not selling soap. He has nothing to
gain. He's in it purely because of
his interest in amateur sports, par-
ticularly outdoor sports."
The Association has compiled a
simple, compact set of by-laws, set-
ting forth clearly the amateur rules
and also containing one interesting

clause. Teams competing in the
tournament can bring their own um-
pire.
That would seem offhand to be
giving them a license to steal, but
Mr. Swan, who fairly drools his ad-
miration when he speaks of Mr. Mar-
tin, says the idea is to promote bet-
ter umpiring in member cities by
giving the umpires an incentive to do
their best so they might be selected.
"The whole idea," he explained,
"is to promote better purely ama-
teur baseball all the way through,
from playing fields to umpires. As I
said, we have no axe to grind."

Crisler's

Gridders

Complete

Summer

Practice

Michigan May
Remove Hockey
From Program

i

Lack of Competition
Is Given as Reason
Lack of competition may force
Michigan to droy hockey from its
athletic program for the time being,
Athletic Director H. 0. Crisler said
Thursday, adding that no definite de-
cision on the matter has been reach-
ed as yet.
In recent years, Coach Eddie
Lowrey's charges have experienc-
ed increasing difficulty in finding
suitable opposition. Last winter's
schedule was composed entirely of
independent amateur outfits, an
arrangement which Crisler term-
ed "not too satisfactory."
Minnesota and Illinois were the
only other Big Ten schools which
sponsored hockey, and when the
Illini dropped the game recently, it
left only the Gophers as possible
Conference opponents. In addition,
most of the smaller Northern Michi-
gan colleges w.which formerly had
hockey teams have discontinued them
for lack of manpower.
Hockey has never caught on very
well in the Mid-West as an inter-
collegiate sport, and transportation
difficulties make it impractical for
Michigan to play Eastern schools.
The chief reason for the lack of
hockey teams in this part of the
country is that most- schools do not
have indoor ice rinks, a necessary
piece of equipment.
If Michigan does decide to drop
hockey, the move will cut the
athletic program from 10 to nine
competitive sports. Hockey was
introduced here in 1921.

Coach Expresses Self as
'Satisfied' in Workouts
Westfall Definitely Will Not Play for Michigan;
Freshman Stars Face Induction into Army
By BILL MULLENDORE
Michigan's gridders wound up the first phase of their preparation for
the defense of the Western Conference football crown yesterday with
several questions definitely answered and a lot more still to be decided
when practice resumes in two weeks.
Coach H. O. Crisler expressed himself as on the whole satisfied with
the showing of his squad, hampered as it was by unusually hot weather
and a wealth of relatively inexperienced material. "I'd hate to play a
game tomorrow," he commented, "but we've come along pretty well. We
did as much as we expected to do, but there is still a lot of work to be done."
One of the more important developments of the past few days was
the definite announcement that former All-American fullback Bob Westfall
will not play for Michigan this fall, even though he will probably enter the
University. If he plays football at all, it will be with the Detroit Lions of
the National Professional football league.
Another relative certainty is the?

Wooded bridle paths that
make these warm days really
delightful. A horse to suit you
no matter what kind of rider
you are. We furnish a courtesy
car for your convenience . . .
GOLFSIDE STABLES.

*

HAMBLETONIAN WINNER-Yankee Maid, Kansas-owned filly, is shown here leading the field to the
finish line to take the second heat of the Hambleto nian at Goshen, N. Y. in 2:04 by four lengths, after
winning the first heat by five lengths in 2:05.
EVEN BEST OF 'EM LOSE:
Yankees Stop Browns' 10-Game Vietory
Streak While Winnino 6-1 at New York

NEW YORK, Aug. 11.-(IP)-The
New York Yankees ended the 10-
game winning streak of the league-
leading Browns today, by smashing
out a 6-1 victory over St. Louis before
8,253 paid admissions.
Veteran Atley Donald limited Luke
Sewell's men to eight scattered hits,
as he registered his 12th victory of
the year, and his third over the
Browns this season against two de-
feats. For his whole career, he now
shows a record of 12 wins and 3

Last Day!

FRANCIS LEDERER

"VOICE IN THE WIND"

E

TOMORROW!
Starts Sunday

ALWAYS COOL !

losses against the St. Louis club.
St. Louis .....000 100 000--1 8 1
New York ,. . .130 020 00x-6 13 11
Jakucki, Hollingsworth, Zoldak
and Turner; Donald and Hemsley.
Three Straight for Burms
CHICAGO, Aug. 11.- (P)- The
Brooklyn Dodgers made it threel
straight over the Chicago Cubs when
they defeated the Bruins 7-6 in 11
innings today.
A single by Luis Olmo with two
out scored Barney Koch, who had
singled and advanced to second on a,
sacrifice, with the winning run.
Brooklyn ..120 012 000 01-7 12 0
Chicago 200 120 001 00-6 11 1
Chapman, McLish, Webber &
Owen; Fleming, Erickson, Chip-
man & Williams, Kreitner.
White Sox Beat Boston ...
BOSTON, Aug. 11.-()-,The Chi-
cago White Sox defeated the Boston
Red Sox, 9-7, today when pitcher
Clem Housmann walked home the
winning run with the score tied at
7-all and two out in the ninth in-
ning.
George (Pinky) Woods, who re-
lieved Housmann, still with the bases
loaded, then walked the next man
and Chicago had its nine runs.
Chicago ......300 100 302-9 10 1
Boston.......023 100 100-7 12 2
Humphries, Ross & Castino,
Tresh; Terry, F. Barrett, Hous-
mann, Wood & Wagner.

Reds Outslug Braves .. .
CINCINNATI, Aug. 11."(A)-The
heat had the pitchers today and the
Boston Braves and Cincinnati Reds
put on a slugging match, with the
Reds taking it, 12 to 6.j
Frank McCormick of the Reds
turned in the big hit of the day, a
home run with two on in the fifth'
when the Reds scored five of their
runs.
Boston ......100 103 100- 6 11 3
Cincinnati . . .000 156 00x-12 17 2
Andrews, Hutchinson & Kluttz;
Heusser, Delacruz & Mueller.
Major League
Standings
i ~NATIONAL LEAGUE,

fact that the much-publicized Dick
Rifenburg probably won't be around
for the starting whistle of the open-
ing game Sept. 16. Rifenburg's sur-
prise announcement that he has en-
listed in the Merchant Marine and1
is waiting his call just about removes
him from the list of end candidates
after he had shown to great advan-
tage during the summer drills.
Uncle Sam may have some more
surprises in store for the Wolverines
before the schedule gets underway.
Gene Derricotte, a fine-looking fresh-
man prospect for the tailback post,
will take his pre-induction physical
for the Army Monday, and if he pas-
ses will undoubtedly enter the Army
very shortly. Others of the promis-
ing group of freshmen will soon be
facing the same thing.
The loss of Westfall still leaves
Crisler a bumper crop of potential
stars at fullback wtih Bob Wiese,
Ralph Chubb and Don Lund all
fighting for the berth. Wiese has
shown his customary bruising tac-
tics in practice while Chubb's line-
busting activities have (stamped
him as the most improved mem-
ber on the squad. Lund will not
report until drills resume, but his
worth has been proved in"two pre-
vious seasons.
This plentitude of talent may bring
about one or more lineup shifts as
the coaching staff tries to reinforce
the weak spots on team. As Chubb
operates best only at fullback, eith-
er Wiese or Lund, or both, may find
themselves with a new assignment.
Wiese has been named as a possible
end candidate to bolster the hole in
the ranks left by Rifenburg.
Although every position on the
starting eleven is still open, Crisler
indicated that he would name the
following lineup if the opener were
today: ends, Bruce Hilkene and
Art Renner (assuming that Rifen-
burg is not available); tacklers,
Clem Bauman and Tom Wright;
guards George Burg and Joe Oem-
ing; center John Lintol or Char-
les Wahl; quarterback Joe Pon-
setto; halfbacks Bob Nussbaumer
and Warren Bentz; and fullback
Wiese.
Browns' Stock Rises
ST. LOUIS, Aug. 11-(A)-With the
Browns firmly in first place in the
American League, stock in the club
sold above $5 par today for the firsty
time since it was issued in 1936.
Brokers reported the sale of 5001
{ shares at $5.25. The stock bought!
as low as $1.75 a share in the Browns'1
less prosperous days.

St. Louis
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
New York . .
Chicago ...
Boston ....
Brooklyn .
Philadelphia

.Detroit Whips
Senators, 1I-4
Victory Extends Tiger
Winning Streak to 8

i

W
74
....:56
. .. ..54
54
46
.....43
43
38

L Pct.
27 .733
45 .554
45 .545
54 .481
52 .469
59 .422
62 .410
60 .388
RESULTS

GB
18
19
25%
26
3.11/>
33/-
341/-

YESTERDAY'S

COLORADO
TROUT

Extra Added --
"HARE
FORCE"

WORLD
NEWS

Cincinnati 12, Boston 6.
Brooklyn 7, Chicago 6.
New York at Pittsburgh, night.
Philadelphia at St. Louis, night.
TODAY'S GAMES
Brooklyn at Chicago.
New York at Pittsburgh.
Boston at Cincinnati.
Philadelphia at St. Louis,. night.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

WASHINGTON, Aug. 11.- (R)-
The Detroit Tigers mopped up on
the Washington Senators again to-
night, 11 to 4, to register their eighth
successive victory and their 14th in
17 engagements with the Capitol
representatives.
A 16-hit Tiger offensive carried
Stub Overmire to his seventh tri-
umph and . extended Washington's
losing streak to 21 losses in its last
24 games. Six victories in the Detroit
streak have been scored on the cur-
rent road trip.
The Tigers started with a rush,
putting over three runs on four hits
and loose Senator play in the first
inning and finishing with five runs in
the ninth with Overmire himself
tripling home the last pair.
DETROIT . . .300 010 205--11 16 2
Washington .110 000 002- 4 12 3
Watrous Shoots
67 To Lead in
Canada Match
SCARBORO GOLF CLUB, SCAR-
BORO, ONT., Aug. 11--(P)-Al Wat-
rous of the Oakland Hills Club, De-
troit, scored a shattering sub-par 67
today to take a commanding lead in
the $7,500 Maple Leaf Invitation
Golf Tournament over the Scarboro
Club's layout.
Next came smooth-stroking Fred-
die Wood. of Quilchena Club, Van-
conver, who added a two-under-par
69 to his one under 70 of yesterday
for a 139 total of a lead of four
strokes over the next Canadian.
Leo Diegel of the Philmont Club,
Philadelphia, Joe Kirkwood, Sr., and
Joe Kirkwood, Jr., the other three
United States pros in the event, were
far off the pace.
Miss Germain
Enters Finals
CHICAGO, Aug. 11-(P)-Defend-
ing champion Dorothy Germain of
Philadelphia today defeated Mrs. H.
N. Sims of Evanston, Ill., the 1941
Minnesota state titlist, 4 and 3 and
will meet Phyllis Otto of Omaha,
Neb., tomorrow in a scheduled 36-
hole match for the women's western
amateur golf crown.
Miss Otto, runner-up in the 1942
western open, advanced through to-
day's semi-final round by routing
Georgia Tainter, Fargo, N. D., star,
7 and 6.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
LOST AND FOUND

PLAY GOLF
Plan a game over the week-
end on our well-kept course.
These links offer you the bess
and most convenient place to
play . . . MUNICIPAL GOLF
COURSE.
LEO PING'S
Open Daily, 11 A. M. to 8 P. M.
A favorite eating place of all
college students. Stop, in for
dinner, lunch and those in-be-
tween snacks.

/

ti J
,, /
i
'
.
..
%

i

I'

p

I

THE II1TERFRATERNITY COUNCIL
prejen Ii di
SUMMER H P
FRIDAY, AUGUST 25th

W
St. Louis .......64
Boston .........57
DETROIT ......54
New York .......54
Cleveland .......53
Chicago ........51
Philadelphia .... 47
Washington.....44
YESTERDAY'S

L Pct.
43 .598
49 .538
50 .519
50 .519
55 .491
55 .481
61 .435
61 .419
RESULTS

GB
61
81/
82
1112
121/
17 /
19

DETROIT at Washington, night.
Cleveland at Philadelphia, night.
New York 6, St. Louis 1.
Chicago 9, Boston 7.

i

i larr inn

Michigan

NOW
SHOWING

OFF ON A SPREE
Ride a bike around Ann Ar-
bor's beautiful suburbs. A bike
is the best way to enjoy these
hot summer days. Rent them
by the day or hour.
ys
CHINESE DELICACIES

RALPH WILSON'S BRND

I

in the

Leactcie

GLLL;OO,

I

1E

I

I I i

I

I

III1 ' I

LOST: Beige raincoat on campus, I

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