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July 08, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-07-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JUIY 8, 1942,

T.H E MICHIGAN DA ILY

I ____________________________________________ I
a

Modern Trends
In Education
Are Discussed
University High School
Teacher, Dr. II. Lui,
Lecture To Educators
"State and National Trends in Ed-
ucatioA," a series of lectures spon-
sored by the education school, swung
into its third week with talks by Fred
G. Walcott, acting head of the Uni-
versity High School English depart-
ment, and Dr. Bangnee A. Liu, of the
China Institute, in the University
High School 4uditorium.
Speaking on "China In American
Schools," Dr. Viu told his audience
yesterday that what started as the
China incident is now "this global
war ,,
The Chinese and Americans, who
are aiding each other in battle, he
continued, can do the same cultur-
ally after the war. He said that the
present study of the Far East in
American schools is inadequate to
bring this about.
Dr. Liu declared that'America must
choose between becoming the "mas-
ter of civilization" or again renoune-
ing leadership in world affairs. "My
conception of citizenship is being a
world citizen--a worthy member of
the human race. I want to see the
future world built on a foundation
of broad, far-sighted education which
will prepare our children fqr world
citizenship."
Walcott spoke Monday on "Popu-
lar Illusions Affecting the Teaching
of English." -
"Education faces undreamed-of
opportunities in the development of
both child welfare and the demo-
cratic way of life when it leans to
capitalize the possibilities for the
growth inherent in the interests of
children," he said.
Drawing on his experiences, Wal-
cott pointed out that .achievement
ltvels do not have to suffer while
gains in maturity and in socializa-
tion are being made.
Men's Club Meets
At Union Today
The Men's Education Club will
meet at 7:15 p.m. today in the Un-
ion, It was announced by Prof. Claude
Eggertsen, of the education school.
'Prof. A. D. Moore of the engineer-
ing college, will present a juggling
remonstration, and Col. William
Ganoe, ROTC head, will give a talk
etitled "Whither." Refreshments
will be served.
The recently elected members of
the 'club are: president, R. 0. Part-
ington, Grad.; vice-president, Charles
E. Forsythe, Grad.; secretary, Lacy
flaith, Grad, and treasurer, George
Luther, Grad.
"Keep A-Head of Your Hair"
Let us give you an individualistic-
custom-made hair style - blended
for you alone. Your welcomed.
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State and Mich. Theatre
r ectea-t2L
ENDING TODAY
74

The Rivals' To Ring Up Curtain
On Repertory Season Tonight

(Continued from Page 1)
Absolute, in this tale resplendent
with romantic triangles and 18th
century atmosphere. Opposite Ste-
phenson, in the role of the extrava-
gant yet simple Lydia Lanquish, is
Helen Rhodes, heroine of "Under the
Gaslight."I
Philip Swander, '44, entering cam-
pus dramatics in "Gaslight," will
portray Faulkland, personification of
perversity, who never loses an oppor-
tunity of making himself and others
miserable. Richard Stewart, '44, full-
voiced newcomer to the Repertory
stage, will enact the meddling, dluel-
ing Sir Lucius.
Also cast in the show are Eleanor
Hughes as Julia; Judy Fletcher, '43,
as L'ucy; Merle Webb, '42, as Thom-
as; Richard Strain, '42, as Fag, and
John Hathaway, as the Boy.
With the technical end of produc-
tion in the hands of guest instruc-
tors, picked from a field of theatrical
professionals, "The Rivals" and sub-
sequent plays 'of the season promise
to be the most successful in Reper-
tory history. The elaborate costumes
of the opener, "The Rivals," will be
created by a famed New York cos-
tumiere and author of numerous
books on the art of costuming, Lucy;
Barton. Sets will be done by Howard'
Bay, celebrated Eastern designer, re-
sponsible for the sets in "The Little
Foxes, "The Corn Is Green," "The
Moon Is Down" and " .. . One-Third

of a Nation . . ." He will be assisted
by his two Broadway assistants, Hor-
ace Armistead, scenic painter, and
William Kellam, scenic builder.
Single tickets for "The Rivals,"

Prof. Reeves
Honored Today
In Last Rites
(Continued from Page 1)
he has awarded for his outstanding
ability as a scholar in 1931, when he
was appointed W. W. Cook professor
of American institutions at the Uni-
versity.
Amherst College and Williams Col-
lege honored Dr. Reeves with de-
grees in 1926 and 1933. He was a
member of theAmerican Socieaty of
International Law, the American
Historical Association, the American
Political Science Association, the In-
ternational Law Association, the In-
stitute de Droit Internationale and
many other organizations.
He was a captain in the United
States air service during the first
World War and was later made a
major, judge advocate of the 20th.
division. He was a staff metiber of
the Army War College in Washing-
ton, D.C., until his discharge from
the armed service in 1918.
Author of several volumes on juris-
drudence and political science, Dr.
Reeves was also associate editor of
the American Journal on Interna-
tional Law.
During his long service with the
University of Michigan he developed
the political science department to
a place high in national esteem. He
was respected by colleagues and stu-
dents for his ability as a jurist and
a scholar of note.
Dr. Reeves is survived by his wi-
dow, Ellen G., of Ann Arbor; a broth-
er, William, of Gambier, O.; a son,
Arthur, of Birmingham; a daughter,
Mrs. Alexander K. Gage, of Grosse
Pointe, and two granddaughters,
Margaret Reeves and Ellen Gage.
He will be buried at Forest Hills
Cemetery.
Annapolis Accepts
Two From U of A
First of a dozen primary and alter-
nate appointees to enter the United
States Naval Academy at Annapolis
from the University were Nelson H.
Upthegrove of Ann Arbor and George
H. Gardner of New Bedford, Mass.
Upthegrove obtained his appoint-
ment through passing the Naval
ROTC examination which the Navy
allows 'only to qualified pstudents of
selected Honor Schools.
Gardner entered the Academy
through a congressional appoint-
ment.

New Engine
Will Improve
Sub-Chasers
WASHINGTON, July 7. -(P-
Foreshadowing an early start of a
mighty new phase of anti-submarine
warfare in American waters. the
Navy announced today the invention,
of a lightweight, high-speed Diesel
engine made especially for use in sub
chasers and already in mass produc-
tion.
The new power plant, along with
a new variable pitch propellor, was
understood to be ready for installa-
tion in quantities of small craft soon
to join the fight against the U-
boats and authorities declared that
these would be craft of superior per-
formance.
"This is the best engine any sub,
chaser ever had," one expert de-
clared.
Developed as the result of more
than 20 years' experimentation un-
dertaken after the last war, the new
engine has four banks of four cylin-
ders each, centered around a vertical
crankshaft. Because of its unusual
shape it has come to be known to the
Navy as "the pancake."
Built as a unit with the engine is
a new type of reversible propeller
which eliminates the need for com-

_a

On The

The American Red Cross hopes for
the early appointment of an Inter-
national Red Cross Committee dele-
gate in Manila to facilitate the open-
ing of avenues of relief there. The
announcement was concurrent with a
report that the Japanese had accept-
ed Red Cross delegates in Hongkong
and Shanghai.
Two thousands tons of food and
a large stock of medical supplies will
be distributed to Allied prisoners and
interned civilians in Hongkong. These
supplies were placed in warehouses
in Hongkong before the fall of the
city.
The Nutrition Pommittee of Wash-
tenaw County, with the help of the
CDVO. is making a survey to ascer-
tain how many graduates in home
economics or dietetics would be in-
terested in a refresher course in nu-
trition for volunteer instruct s and
speakers.
Miss Margaret McLaughlin and
Miss Bauck will give the course eith-
er the last week in July or the first
week of August. Anyone interested
should call 2-5546.
--NOTICE
All women registered in the Sum-
mer Term and Summer Session of
the School of Music are invited to a
picnic supper on the Island Friday
night. The group will meet at 5:15
p.m. in front of the music school.

CLARIBEL BAIRD
which runs through Saturday, or
season tickets for the five plays. and
the operetta, are on sale daily except
Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the
Mendelssohn Theatre box office.

plicated, heavy

reverse gears

Michigan Summaries

--s-

Cercle Francais.
Will Hold Second
Meeting Tomnorrow
The second summer meeting of the
Cercle Francais will be held at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow it the League.
Dr. George Kiss o1 the geography
department will talk on "L'Europe et
l'Avenir".$ He will discuss certain
phases of the European situation
with which he is familiar.
At the group's first meeting on
Thursday the following officers were
elected to the 'executive committee-
president, Mrs. Marie Louise Morris,
Grad.; vice president, Edwin D.
Snake, Grad.; secretary, Miss Cath-
erine Olthouse, Grad., and treasurer,
Miss Ethel Killham, Grad.
Two Michigan Alumni
Added To Casualty Lists
Lionel J. Tachna, '38BAd, ensign
in the USNR, was reported missing
after action in one of the recent Pa-
cific sea battles.
It was also announced that James
Hugh McKean, '16, author of "The
Land of the White Elephant" and
the former superintendent of the
Chieng Mai Leper Asylum in China
died May 16 after a harrowing flight
from the Japanese.

MI HIGAN
MJILITAIRY
gMEN.
With the news pouring in from
enlistment centers and training
camps throughout the nation con-
cerning the activities and promotions
of former Michigan students, comes
word from soldiers who commenced
their military training in the campus
unit of the ROTC.
With one accord, these letters from
former ROTC cadets note the fine
comparison with which their mili-
tary training which they received at
the University makes with officers
from other schools throughout the
country. Several officers who gradu-
ated from the University in the
spring are now in camps receiving
additional training.
At Fort Murphy. Fla., Second Lieut.
Theodore Borst, '42E, is serving at
the Air Raid Warning Center. 'Borst
was member of the Signal Corps of
the ROTC.
Second Lieut. William W. Fischer,
'42E, Ann Arbor, is in training in the
Signal Corps at Fort Monmouth, N. J.
Fischer is serving under Lt.-Col. Wal-
lington, who, as a captain in 1937,
served as the Signal Corps instructor
at the University.

King-Seeley AB
Metz, 3b ......... 4
Rossbach, lf, p .. 2
Waldo, D., lb .... 3
Zoll, 2b..........3
Jessop, c .........3
Waldo, B., ss .... 3
Berry, cf.........3
Briggs, rf ........ 3
Schupe, p ...... 1
Ledwige, lf .......1
Siler, ph-9th .... 1

H
2
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
0

R
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
1
2
7
0
4
1
2
0
1
0
0

A
3
0
0
3
0
2
1
0
1
0
0

E
0
0
0
0
'0
0
0
0
1
0
0

""11.

co

Totals.......27 5 0 1810 1

Michigan AB
Hliggins, 2b .......3
Mikulich. rf......2
Wikel, ss........3
Lund, cf......... 3
Chappius, c....... 3
Vernier, lb .......3
Anderson, 3b .... 3
Smith, 3b ........0
Brown, if ........,2
Trowbridge, if .... 0
Redinger, p .......3
Totals.......25
King-Seeiey ..... 0
Michigan ........3P

H
2
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
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I
1
1
1
0
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0
1
1
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0
10
7
0
0
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0
0

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7 5 21 5
00 000 0-0 5
10 000 x-5 7

1
1
1

Education Students Commence Studies
Of Adolescents At 'U' Fresh Air Camp

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Approximately sixty students from
the Bchool of Education workshops
were guests of the University Fresh
Air Camp Thursday evening as they
attended the first of a series of clin-
ical studies on individual adjustment
prQblems of adolescent boys.
Conducted by Dr. Fritz Redl of the
School of Education and Dr. Lester
Hqwitt of the sociology department,
the clinics form an integral part of
the unique educational setup at the
Patterson Lake camp.
In addition to the services provided
for approximately 250 boys each
summer, the camp serves as a labora-
tory for study, research and prac-
tical experience in the fields of men-
tal hygiene, guidance, group work
and sociology.
* * *
The 22nd annual camp opening
took place last Monday after a week

of intensive training for all the stu-
dent counselors, some 21 of them.
The entire staff spent the week pre-
paring cabins, launching boats, map-
ping recreation plans for the boys,
and holding informal discussions on
the camp counselor's responsibilities.
* * *
New to the Fresh Air Camp this
year is the large number of woman
counselors. Any doubts of their com-
petence rapidly vanished as they
took holld itl fine style.
* * *
Greatest recipients of the good
things of life, however, were the boys.
They swam, fished, played games,
treasure-hunted, ate, sang, ran and
slept to their hearts' delight. Edu-
cational opportunities were largely
disregarded in the opening week as
the boys adjusted themselves to, the
new conditions of group living.

I

I

HELP WANTED
ALL YEAR ROUND room job near
Law School. Call 7380 or 4800. 7c
MALE or FEMALE for soda fountain.
Evenings. Gratton Drug, State at
Packard. Phone 4344. Ile
WOMEN to take charge of small
apartment and 2 children for em-
ployed parent. Call 2-3998 after
7:30 p.m. 9
Registered Nurses Attention: Your
services are very much needed for
full time and part time duty. Come
in and talk it over with us. Com-
munity Nursing Bureau. Beatrice
A. Hoban, Registrar. 401 Thomp-
son, 6515. 9c
ROOM and BOARD
BOARD OFFERED by Kappa Sigma
fraternity. Good meals at $1.00
per day. Inquire at 806 Hill or
phone 4850. 7
FOR SALE
ENGLISH Boys' Bike, 3 speeds, new
tires, hand brakes. Excellent con-
dition. Manussa's Service Station,
S. Univ. 8

FOR RENT
LOVELY ROOM for graduate stu-
dent, campus secretary, or teach-
er. 422 E. Washington. 8c
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
MISCELLANEOUS
BABY WRENN NURSERY - Home
care for infants and small chil-
dren. Call 8531. 4*
*LADIES, have you had your feather
permanent as yet? They are so
cool, lovely and easy to manage.
Open Thursday and Friday eve-
nings ,for your convenience. Blue-
bird Hair Shoppe, 5 Nickels Ar-
cade. 12c
WANTED
BOARD and ROOM offered. To drive
and do odd jobs. Call 6018. 343
S. Fifth Ave.
WANTED TO RENT
TEACHER, wife and child desire
modern furnished apartment. Oc-
cupancy July 6 to August 21. Cdll
Williams, 4439 after 7:30 p.m. 5*

- 1

Ih
A su
yearf
sole-t
wide-
won'
pink
'' Short

I

I

MICHIGAN REPERTORY PLAYERS
Of The Department of Speech
in
Sheridan's Gay Comedy of. Manners

JOYCE
2 25
,i you'll love now and a
from now! Pretty cami-
ype top with embroid-
figure-loving back and
-bottomed skirt that
t ride or twist. Petal
or white rayon satin.
and medium lengths.

I

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