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August 15, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-08-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Veterans Hubbell, Warneke, Davis
Win Contests In National League.

Lecture Series
tor 1942-43
Is Announced,

B B ALE CHAMPION
From Associated Press summaries
Yesterday was old man's day in the
National League as three of the cir-
cuit's most venerable pitchers turned
in brilliant hurling performances.
Most heartening of all was the fine
performance of old meal ticket Carl
Hubbell of the New York Giants.
Definitely tagged as through this
year, he was to be kept around most-
ly as a relief hurler for his old pal
and roommate Mel Ott, the new
managr.
Cliff Melton, the lofty lefty, was
the club's No. 1 portsider and was
doing very well indeed until a sore
arm cost Ott his best pitcher.
Then Carl, whose amazing control
of the difficult screwball had kept
him in there pitching with a few wins
to his credit, promptly took over Mel-
ton's spot and although the fans hate
to see Melton out, it -sure looks good
to see the crooked arm of the old
Meal Ticket on the firing line again.
Yesterday he polished off, a nice
streak of seven wins with a four hit
victory over the Phils, 5-2.
Hubbell wasn't the only oldtimer
who really gave out. In Chicago on
his old stamping grounds, Lon War-
neke recently returned from St. Louis
did almost as well. He checked the
Pirates with seven hits. and coasted
home with a 7-1 win in his pocket.
The ever-popular Arkansas hurler
seems tq be doing the Cubs some of
the kind of good they need. Many
young Cardinal hurlers give Warneke
credit for helpful hints, and maybe
he can do the same for the Cubs'
promising, but seldom producing re-
cruits. Whether or not, the Cubs are
probably willing to pay a salary that
St. Louis wouldn't afford just to win
a few ball games.
Still a third veteran that every-
body has a good word for is Curt
Davis who last night chalked up his
12th win for the Dodgers. In the
second game of a doubleheader which
the Broks won, he bumped up
against Manuel Salvo, the Braves'
beanball duelist of last week, and
came out on the long end of a 10-0
triumph.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
REPLIES
THERE IS a reply in Box 8.
HELP WANTED
YObNG MAN with clothing selling
experience to work from noon to
six and all day Saturday. Perma-
nent position. Reply Box 15, Mich.
}Daily 33c
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Plain gold band ring. In-
scription, "Solid Gold." Important
heirloom significance. Generous
reward. Call 2-2852. 38x
FOUND--Topcoat in Univ. bldg.
Identify it and it's yours. Call Bill
Schoedinger, 2-3101. 39
BUY WAR BONDS
AND STAMPS HERE
Ends Tonite

Tigers 7, Chisox I
Chicago ......000 100 000-1
Detroit .......000 103 03x-7
Lee and' Dickey; White and
sons.
* * *

(Continued from Page 1)

4 2
9 0
Par-

been given special privileges, had
talked with Weygand and Petain, and
had been allowed to roam through
French possessions in Northern Afri-

Brooks Win Two
Boston .......000 000 000-0 7 0
Brooklyn.....410 100 40x-10 15 0
Salvo, Hutchings and Kluttz; Da-
vis and Owen.,
Boston .......000 000 102--3 8 1
Brooklyn .....022 011 10x-7 11 0
Earley, Sain and Masi; Wyatt and
Sullivan. , , ,
Chicago 7, Pirates 1
Pittsburgh ...000 001 000-1 7 3
Chicago ......220 000 21x-7 18 2
Klinger, Lanning, Wilkie and Lo-
pez; Warneke and Hernandez.
* *
Giants 5, Phils 2
Philadelphia ..010 010 000-2 4 0
New York ....101 000 12x-5 6/ 0
Johnson, Nahem and Bragpn;
Hubbell and Danning.
* * * *
Night Baseball
Cincinnati .... 000 000 000-0 2 2'
St. Louis .....000 120 01x-4 7 1
Derringer and Lakeman; M. Coop-
er and W. Cooper.
New York ....300 041 012-11 12 1
Philadelphia . .100 001 000-2 7 2
Gomez and Dickey; Marchildon, R.
Harris and Swift.
Major League Standinga
AMERICAN LEAGUE j

ca unmolested.
Fischer was for eighteen years the
chief European correspondent of The
Nation, traveling constantly from
one capital to another to catch de-
velopments in the international
scene. One of the greatest American
authorities on Soviet Russia, he lived
for many years in Moscow and spent
much time in Berlin in pre-Hitler
days.
Nov. 19, Mrs. Ruth Mitchell, sister
of the late General William (Billy)
Mitchell, who has experienced one of
the most fascinating stories of the
Ipresent war during her stay in Yugo-
slavia, will speak on "The Yugoslavs
Fight On". In April. 1941, she joined
the Chetniks, Bulgarian and Servian
guerrilla troops, and served as a dis-
patch rider with the Chetnik leader.
Louis Adamic, author of "My
America," will speak on "Tolerance
Is Not Enough" Nov. 30. Now serving
as Consultant to the Defense Com-
mission in Washington, he is an ex-
pert on new immigrant and related
matters. He is now engaged in writ-
ing a series of five books intended
to "end the psychological war" in
America.
Alexander P. de Seversky, author
of "Victory Through Air Power", and
one of the most determined critics of

Surprise State
Blackout Drills
Are Promised
Head Of Citizens' Defense
Corps Tells Of Alerts
Planned For Michigan
LANSING, Aug. 14.-(X )--South-
ern Michigan communities which
participated in this week's blackout
practice can expect orders at any
time to stage surprise blackouts on an
hour's notice, it was asserted today
by Capt. Donald S. Leonard, state
commander of the Citizens' Defense
Corps.
Occasional blackouts will be au-
thorized from time to time to keep
the public in practice, Leonard said,
"but we are not going to let them
continue to the point where they be-
come a public nuisance.''
The 41-county blackout Wednes-
day night proved, he said, that Mich-
, igan citizens are willing to cooperate
in air raid precautions and also
showed that a good job of blacking
out cities can be accomplished here.
Now, Leonard said, the job is to
improve'sthe speed of blackouts with
surprise alerts and to train local de-
fense corps.
He and Lieut. Col. Wen J. Cleary,
I state chief air raid warden, advised
local corps to emphasize "incident"
drills which call on medical, fire, po-
lice and repair squads to act as they
would in case of an actual emergen-
cy.
Such drills can be accomplished
without the disruption of civilian life
that a blackout requires, they pointed
out.
Cleary said Michigan communities
must enlist more air raid wardens,
particularly among housewives who
will be able to serve in residential
districts in case of daytime alarms.
"The community which bases its
air raid warden system on men who
will be downtown at places of bus-
iness or in 'factories and unable to
get home during a day alarm is due
for- a rude shock," Cleary said. "The
system in each block should be such
that there will be someone available'
for warden duty at all times."

Designer Creates Papier-Mache
Armor For 'H.M.S. Pinafore'
By BERYL SHOENFIELD 'gan working as costumiere for Thom-
Papier mache takes on the glint of as Wood Stevens World War I prop-
armor plate while wire. paper, feath- aganda show. This was an ideal ar-
ers, cardboard and wood in combine raugement. says Miss Barton. since
become elaborate Aztec headdresses producer and costumiere were so
under the talented fingers of Lucy much in accord artistically that no
Barton, guest instructor in costume sketch was ever necessary in, convey-
design and creator of the 1830 finery ing Steven's plan for a costume to
seen in current Repertory vehicle. her mind. Attending Carnegie with
"H. M. S. Pinafore." Miss Barton were three names famil-
The name Lucy Barton is usulially iar to campus drama-goers: Valen-
associated with Elihaethan period tine Windt, Director of Play Produc-
patterns, because of her extensive tion; Charles E. Meredith, guest in-
work on wardfobes of that time for structor and director of current sea-
pageants and theatrical productions, son plays "Thunder Rock" and "Mis-
and it is particularly iemembered in alliance;" and Carl Benton Reid,
connection with Chicago World stage and screen actor, frequently
Fair's Globe Theatre. in which she seen on the local stage.
did costuming for 15 Shakespearean Author of "Historic Costume for
plays, including "Othello,." "Midsum- the Stage" and "Period Patterns,"
mer Night's Dream." "Caesar," Miss Barton specializes in pageantry
"Taming of the Shrew" and "Mac- costuming, where a knowledge of
beth." history, anthropology and changing
New England-bred Miss Barton dress is essential, for "pageants are
has been prominent in tributary the- educational and there can be no ex-
atre circles since graduation from cuse for them if they are not accur-
Carnegie Tech, at which time she be- ate and therefore instructive." Even

1[

With but one more wveek left be-
fore SummerProm, Aug. 21, students
and townspeople are urged to buy
tickets now as the supply is limited
and once exhausted there will be no
more printed, Dick Rawdon, ticket
chairman, said yesterday.
Tickets may be purchased at the
League and Union desks throughout
the day and at several local stores as
well as from any member of the cen-
tral committee.
Althoughit was announced last
May by authoritative sources that
there would be no more big dances
for the duration, the sponsoring
campus organizations obtained per-
mission for this dance only because
Summer Prom is not a social affair
but rather a means to supply funds
for Russian War Relief. United China
Relief and the Bomber Scholarship.
Wenzel To Present
Violin Recital Here
In partial fulfillment of the re-
quirements for the degree of Master
of Music, Mr. Henry Wenzel, violin-
ist, will present a public recital at
8:30 p. m. today in the Assembly Hall
of the Rackham Building,
Mr. Wenzel, who will be accompan-
ied by Kathleen Rinck, pianist, re-
ceived his bachelor's degree from
Oberlin College in 1933 and since
then has been a member of the fac-
ulty of Central College, Fayette, Mo.,
and Yankton College in South Da-
kota. At the present time he is In-
structor of Violin and head of the
string and wind instruments depart-
ment at Mary Hardin-Baylor College.

Prom Tie
Fast As

W L Pit. G
New York.......74 37 .667
Boston .........60 50 .545 13
Cleveland .......61 53 .535 14:
St. Louis.......59 56 .513 17
Detroit.........57 61 .483 20
Chicago........49 59 .454 23
Washington .....46 61 .430 26
Philadelphia ....44 73 .376 33
Games Saturday
Chicago at Detroit
New York at Philadelphia (2)
Washington at Boston (2)
St, Louis at Cleveland (night)
* * *
NATIIONAL LEAGUE

GB
1/2
12
%1/

Rural Schools
Face Closure
Teacher Shortage In State
Termed 'Most Acute'
LANSING, Aug, 14.-QP)-Dr. Eu-
gene B. Elliott, Superintendent of
Public Instruction, said today the
war-caused shortage of teachers may
result in the voluntary closing of
about 1,000 one-room school houses
in rural areas of the state.
Reporting a survey showed Michi-
gan has 2,000 fewer teachers signed
up for the opening of schools next
month than it needs to maintain
present administrative policies, the
superintendent called for drastic re-
lieving action.
He said none of the thousand
schools he mentioned has more than
12 pupils, and that the children could
be transported to nearby schools in
school busses already in operation.
He pointed out, however, that the
schools could be closed only by vol-
untary action of the officials.
His survey, Elliott said, showed the
teacher shortage is most acute in
the smaller rural, village and cityj
schools. For the most part, he said,
large cities have maintained ade-
quate staffs, save in some specialized
fields such as the teaching of shop
work, agriculture, commercial stu-
dies, music, physical education and
the physical sciences including
mathematics.

ARTKINO presents
SFirst Soviet Drama of
Europe's Heroic Resistance
Io the Nazis
RA ZKHAM LECTURE HALL
TONIGHT, AUGUST 15, at 8:30 P.M.

in musical comedies, Miss Barton
contends, where there is "no historic
obligation," the common belief that
"anything old-fashioned goes" does
not apply.
When New Mexico brought its
"Entrada of Coronado" pageant to
Texas and Colorado in 1940, in cele-
bration of Coronado's exploration in-
to that region 400 years before, Miss
Barton was on hand to design the
500 costumes-each authentic in ev-
ery detail. Graphite was painted on
papier mache and burnished to sim-
ulate the armor of the Spanish con-
quistadores

- .,__

I.

Brooklyn
St. Louis..
New -york . .
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago.
Boston ....
Philadelphia

W L
78 33
S69 42
S60 53
.57 52
S50 56
. 52 64
.....47 68
....31"'76

.703
.622
.531
.523
.472
.448
.409
.290

GB

9
19
20
251/2
28 'A
33
45

JAY ALLEN

Games Saturday
Philadelphia at New York (2)
Boston at Brooklyn
Pittsburgh at Chicago (2)
Cincinnati at St. Louis

,

9

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DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

' I
f (Continued from Page 2)
Tuesday, August 18th. 4:05 p. m.
University High Auditorium.
Oriental Colonization in Latin
America, by Professor Robert B. Hall
of the University Geography Depart-
ment, Tuesday, August 18. 4:15 Rack-
ham Amphitheatre. Professor Hall
has just returned from an extensive
tour of Latin America where he has
been studying the Japanese and Chi-
nese colonization.
Maintaining Morale, by William
Clark Trow, Professor of Educational
Psychology Wednesday, August 19.,
4:05 p. m. University High Auditor-
ium.

this country's aircraft, will speak
here some time in December on "Vic-
tory Through Air Power".'
Margaret Bourke-White, famed
photographer who has recently re-
turned' from a journey around the
world that included an assignment
as radio commentator in Moscow,
will lecture on "Russian Women in
the War" Feb. 4.
Feb. 18 will bring Walter Duranty,
famous foreign correspondent for the
New' York Times and the North
American Newspaper Alliance, and
author of "I Write as I Please", for
a talk on "When East Meets West in
Battle."
Noted for his colorful anecdotes
and flashing wit, Duranty is recog-
nized as one of the foremost speak-
ers on the warand its implications
for Americans and for his profound
knowledge of the men and motives
back of today's conflict.
The series will be concluded March
12 when T. R. Ybarra speaks on the
subject "Latin America Tomorrow."
For many years Latin-American cor-
respondent of the New York Times,
Ybarra has been writing on interna-
tional affairs almost continuously
for two decades.I
The box office sale on tickets will
begin Oct. 5 in Hill Auditorium.

First Iron Warship
Consigned To Scrap
ERIE, Pa., Aug. 14.-(!P-Ameri-
ca's first iron-hulled warship, the
98-year-old Wolverine, was con-
signed today to the junkman to be
scrapped for making into steel.
After listening to considerable de-
bate, including an hour's plea by
James Purcell, president of the Ni-
agara Historical Society, to save the
vessel for its historic value, the city
council instructed its engineering de-
partment to take bids from scrap
dealers for the ship.
Originally the U.S.S. Michigan, the
Wolverine was turned over to the
city in 1927 but two years ago it was
ordered closed to visitors.
HORSES
Ride at
Golfside Stables
PRIVATE and
CLASS INSTRUCTION
Free Transportation
WOODED BRIDLE PATH
CT A2-3441
OUT GEDDES AVENUE

r

TICKETS 39c

Also SHORT SUBJECTS

R.

Proceeds to be used to buy medicines for the Russian Armies.
Ann Arbor Committee for Russian War Reliet

I,

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CHURCH

'II

-___ _. s.._._ _. _.-_
t.

DIRECTORY

I

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

BY REMOTE
CONTROL!
The Year's Surprise Thrill
SFINGERS
atthe.
INDW

Churches
First Church of Christ, SO
409 S. Division St.
Sunday morning service at
Subject: "Soul.""
Sunday School at 11:45.
Free public Reading Room
(ontinued on Page 4)

cientist,I

I

""""""""-

with

LEW
AYRES

LARRAINE
DAY

For a Complete Summer Prom-
We suggest
DINNER: HE ALLENEL
DINNER AT THE ALLENEL adds a festival note
to any occassion. The fine food and drink the
Allenel offers are unexcelled in Ann Arbor.
The atmosphere is one of refinement anl gayety.
All in all, we recommend the Allenel for the
start of an enjoyable evening. If you are plan-
ning a large party call us today obout informa-
tion regarding our facilities for private parties.
II~ I,

Ministers: William P. Lemon, D.D.,
Willard V. Lampe
Mark W. Bills, Director of Music
Franklin Mitchell, Organist
10:45 a.m. Church School Summer Session and
Nursery during the hour of Morning Worship.
10:45 g.m. Morning Worship. Sermon by the
Reverend Fred Cowin of the Christain
Church. Union service with the congregation
of the Christain Church.
6:15 p.m" Westminster Student Guild Social
Luncheon followed by talk at 7:15 by Mr.
Tien on "Christain Opportunity in China."
The speaker is a Chinese Christain who is
teaching in the Oriental Language Division
of the University.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Ministers: Charles W. Brashares
and Ralph Dunlop
Music: Maynard Klein, director
and John Dexter, organist.
9:30 a.m. Student Class on "Religious Counsel-
ing." Dr. E. W. Blakeman, leader.'
9:45 a.m. Church School for all departments
above primayy.
10:40 a.m. Church School for nurserybeginners,
and primary departments.
10:40 a.m. Worship service. Dr. E. D. Kohlstedt,
chairman of the Board of Home Missions
of the Methodist Church will preach. Dr.
Kohlstedt's subject will be, "A Functioning
Faith."
11.30 a.m. Junior activity period.
6:00 p.m. Supper and fellowship. 6:40 p.m.,
Rev. Ralph G. Dunlop will speak on the sub-
ject, "Are We The Lights?," followed by a
discussion period.
Wednesday:
4:00 to 5:30 p.m. Tea and open house for
students in student lounge.
7:30 p.m. Mid-week service.
Friday:
8:00 to 12:p.m. Informal student party.

10:00 a.m. Children's Departments of the Church
School.
10:15 a.m. Adult Classes of the Church School.
Student Class meets in the Guild House, 502
East Huron.
11:00 a.m. The Church at WTorship.
Rev. John Mason Wells of Hillsdale College
and former minister of this church will
preach.
Miss Delta Doran will sing.
7:00 p.m. The Roger Williams Guild meets in
the Guild House._. ..
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 South Division St,
Wednesday evening service at 7:30.
Sunday morning service at 10:30. ' -
Subject: "SOUL." M 9
Surday School at 11:45:
Free public Reading Room at 106 East Wash-
ington St., open every day except Sundays
and holidays from 11:30 a.m. until 5 p.m.,
Saturdays until R p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
G. H. Loucks, Minister
Mrs. Geil Orcutt, Associate
selor.

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Student Coon-

BASIL RATHBONE

Also
MARCH OF TIME
"MEN OF THE FLEET"
"PICTURE PEOPLE"
NEWS
-Starts' Sunday -

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 North Division at Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
The Rev. John G. Dahl, Curate
George Fax6n, Organist and Choirmaster
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
11:00 a.m. Kindergarten,: Church Office build-
ing.
11:00 a.m. Morning Prayer and Sermon by the
Rev. Mr. Dahl.
COLLEGE WORK PROGRAM
Sunday, 5:00 p.m. Student Picnic at the Saline
Valley Farms.

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