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August 14, 1942 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-08-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWE MTf'.HIrC- A N n A TT.,v

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Prof. Klein To Direct Sunmer
Session Chorus Here Sunday

. . . .. . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . .

PALMFR CHRISTIAN
is now a member of the faculty of
the Sophie Newcomb College and Tu-
lane University.
Professor Palmer Christian will be
the organist for the evening. The
solo parts. for the evening will be
sung by Arthur Hackett, tenor; Blair
McClosky, baritone; Delta Dean Do-
ran, mezzo-soprano, Margaret Mar-
tin, soprano, Mary Craigmiles, so-
prano; and Betty Mason, soprano.
Both the faculty and students of
the University and the people of Ann
Arbor are invited to attend.
Latin Relsation
Are Proimoted

Dance Theme
Is 'Bluebook
Blues'_Today
Poll Casts 'Kalamazoo'
As No. One Campus it
For Summer Prom
Th'e end of summer session is in
sight and the atmosphere for eight-
week students is somewhat clouded
by the inevitable arrival of final ex-
aminations. Hence the League, in
heartfelt sympathy, has christened
its Friday evening, 9 to midnight, all-
campus dance with the name of
"Bluebook Blues."
Everybody is invited but it is es-
pecially designed for providing a few
hours of relaxation for those who feel
benumbed with zero hour cramming.
The walls of the League ballroom
are to feature special decorations,
typical exam questions on one side
and their answers on the opposite
Doc Sprachlin will lead Gordon Har-
dy's Orchestra in a series of arrange-
ments calculated to cheer up any-
body who may have the vestige of a
troubling doubt about his academic
future.
The singing of the Harmony Quar-
tet and the swinging of the Dixieland
band-within-a-band will take all
minds, it is hoped, off any troubles
and Helen Rhoade's contralto voice
will show how pleasant some aspects
of a "mood indigo" can be. Blue-
bowed hostesses will be on hand to
extend-the welcome of the League.
Tomorrow evening's dance, since
it is the last to occur at the League
during the summer session, will be
the "Final Fling.''
* * *
Prom Hit Is 'Kalamazoo'
After two days of personal can-
vassing on the part of central com-
mittee members, "Kalamazoo" col-
lected the most votes to become num-
ber one on the Summer Prom Hit
Parade of five tunes, which will be
featured by Hal McIntyre and his
orchestra at the Summer Prom, Aug.
21.
"Stage Door Canteen" slid into
second place while "Jingle Jangle
Jingle" took a comfortable third and
"Silver Wings" and "Sleepy Lagoon"
placed fourth and fifth.
The all-campus popular tune poll
showed a sharp contrast to the re-
sults of a similar poll presented
weekly by a radio program, placing
national favorites anywhere but at
the top with many not even ap-
proaching the top ten.
Student taste lowered the national
number one hit "Jingle Jangle Jin-
gle" to third place and brought out
"Stage Door Canteen" which has not
figured so far in the radio's Hit
Parade.
Proving Michigan a progressive
and alert campus, "Kalamazoo," the
tune that's on the tips of everyone's
tongue," climbed undisturbed to the
top of the jaz ladder as number one
and becomes automatically the tune
that will receive the most McIntyre
devotion Aug. 21. The radio's Hit
Parade has not featured it yet.
Tickets for Summer Prom, the only
big project attempted by campus or-
ganizations this summer, are now on
sale at the League and Union and
various local stores.

Clark Gable Eitrs Army As iiuk Private
~ 4
ii
1

Cur tis States
Change Needed
In Educat ion
A progressively-minded teacher in
every classroom is the way to have
pi gress in education. Dr. Francis D.
Curtis, of the education school,
s* ted in yesterday's education series
lc ture at University High School.
$ leelared that progressive teach-
ir consists of being willing to make
chnges in procedures, and that in
this regard the state of mind is most
irn }ortant. These changes, Dr. Cur-
td: pointed out, gather momentum
and carry a constructive spirit into
the classroom which makes teaching
mere than a matter of routine.
Progressive teachers of every age,
he said, have become famous through
this desire to study and modify their
procedures. He stated that the pres-
ent progressive movement has con-
tributed largely in the field of test-
ing, and the adaptation of physical
activity to the classroom and in the
intangibles of teaching.
Dr. Curtis cautioned, however, that
progressive education does not mean
that all which has been developed in
the past must be discarded. He point-
ed out that people who think pro-
gress comes only by revolution are
no more correct than those who hold
that progress is always of an evolu-
tionary nature. Super-conservatives,
he suggested, might be considered as
the anchors of education, and super-
progressives as the dynamos. He said
both serve a purpose but neither is
desirable alone.
I -~ -_____ -
BUY WAR BONDS AND
STAMPS HERE
Shows tQoiiy 1 -3-5-7-9 p m.

Hail Will Give
Talk TIesday
'U' ProfeSso ol '')Diu;S
Oriental Settlements
Prof. Robert B. Ha 1 of the geogra-
phy department, recentlv returned
from an extensive LiI Ihrough
South America. will lecture on "Ori-
ental Settlements in Latin Amwrica'
at 4:15 p. m. Tuesay in ithe amphi-
theatre of the Rackham Buiding.
Journeying about through1 the
Latin American republics: Prof. Hall
studied Japanese colonies in particu-
lar as well as Chinese and Philippine.
11Prof. Hall is peculiarly cuipped for
making the trip, having previously
led several research parties in Japan
and having studied t here.
The trip was made available by a
grant from the Rockefeller I'ound±-
tion.
Before leaving for iis year -long
travels, Prof. Hall was Chairmn of
the Division of Social Sciences of the
University. He also has been Director
of the Institute of Oriental Studies
and Chairman of the Program of
Oriental Civilization.
Now S-howin
Y Now Showing

Clark Gable, idol of thousands of feminine movie-goers, is
sworn in as a buck private in the Army by Col. Malcolm r. Andruss
in Los Angeles. After three months bAsic training at Miami, Fla.,
Gable said be hopes to enroll in an off icer'- training school.

Schools Are Ir ed o Teaci
'eemperanee In Al T ings'
LANSING. Aug. 13.- (P)-- A bulbe- the urogr am would encounter diffi-

South
Aide

American Society
Social Activities

Established for the purpose of pro-
Is viding social activities and promoting
better understanding, the Latin-
American Society is composed of
-___- ninety students here from countries
darned, in Central and South America.
2c The Society, which was organized
this spring, has already held several#
picnics and carries on a Latin-Amer-
ican music hour at the International
Center. Among their plans for the
future are the formation of teams
ANTED. for competitive sports and the publi-
y Check- cation of a regular bulletin. They also
31c hope to make a collection of Latin-
American books for the library at the
in ex- International Center.
raternity The number of students on campus
elephone at the present time from their coun-
32c tries is especially large because of the'
. selling war end also because of the Good
sellng tNeighbor Policy, according to the
noonPermao Society's president, Dr. Mattos Pi-
5, Mich menta. Dr. Pimenta stated that the
33c understanding which these visitors
get of this country is as important
as the scientific knowledge that they
-- take back to their native lands.
lost at Directors of the group include Ju-
30. Re- dith Jimenez, treasurer, Edward
2-4509. Franzetti, Secretary, Enrique Her-
36 rarte, interboard representative, and
ng. In- Emilio Angel, social chairman.
iportant JULY ACCIDENTS INCREASE
fenerous J
38x LANSING, Aug. 13.-OP)-For the
second consecutive month, the State
. bldg. Department of Labor and Industry
Call Bill reported today, compensable acci-
39 dents in Michigan during July in-
creased, this time from 2,579 in June
to 2,793 last month.
fall gar- The department said 171 cases in-
ed now. volved permanent disabilities, and 31
Graves, fatalities, an increase of 10 deaths
37 over June.

tin urging the schools of Michigan to'
teach their pupils "temperance in all
things" was completed bV the De-
partment of Public Instruction to-
day.
It outlines and recommends to
school superintendents a program for
gauging the temperance teachings to
the ability of the child to absorb
them.
"Temperance education," the bul-
letin cautions. "cannot stop with the
schools. If such education is to be
successful, it must represent the co-
operative effort of the home, school
and community."
Elliott said the goal was worth-"
while, although he recognized that

cult es whiere parents were intemper-
ate and cemnmunities lacked the
proper facilities for cooperation.
The bullet in stresses physical ef-
feces of over-indulgence, and de-
clared that the conception .of tem-
perate living must embrace eating,
working and recreation, as well as
drinking. On the latter subject, it
says, there is no evidence that mod-
erate usc of alcoholic beverages af-
fects the life span, but it points to
evils of immoderate use.
t mentions a. dozen classes, in-
cluding science, history, home nurs-
ing, home making and athletics as
ideal for driving home' lessons in
temprrate living.

Now Playing!

I

F

A RT K i N Q presents
F First Soviet Drama of
Europe's Heroic Resistance
to the Nazis
SR ACK HAM LECTURE KA LL,
Thurs., Fri., Sat., Aug. 13, 14, 15, 8:15 P.M.

r

[

I

VAN HEF LIN
MWIARSHA
HUNT- BOWMAN
Extra
humba Rhythms
Cartoon, "Pigeon Patrol"
Sports News
Sunday
"MAGNIFICENT DOPE"

TICKETS 39c

Also SHORT SUBJECTS

I

Proceeds to be used to buy medicines for the Russian Armies.
Ann Arbor Committee for Russian War Relief

Added
MARCH of TIME
Novelty News
Sunday
'BEYOND THE
BLUE HORIZON"

I

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iI

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11

A PRE-VIEW OF FALL

Cut-Rate
365
Days a Year

ARS HAaLL
235 South State ... Next to State Theatre

'S

Cut-Rate
365
Days a Year

FLATTERING

WOOL

SUITS

Correct anywhere -at college
or in town - suits are again
the rage this fall. You can be
sure that the smartly dressed
co-ed will have one of these new
charmers in her college ward-
robe. They come in Pine Leaf
Green, Brown, Black, and Scar-
let. Sizes 10-20.
$18.95and up
Also separate Camel's Hair
Jackets and Wool Skirts

DRUGS

- COSMETICS

,r

Attcntion!

MAX FACTOR... REVLON
COTY... YARDLEY ... LELONG
LENTHERIC ... MATCHABELLI
RAYMOND .. . RUBENST EIN

TOBACCOS
MARSHALL'S OFFERS
THESE SERVICES:
War Stamps
s Postage Stamps
* We will cash your checks

.4

Free! Class of '46
An Identification Case that will hold your
student cards! Just the right size for the
cards issued to identify yourself for all stu-
dent activities, etc.
Just drop us a line and let us reserve one
for you. Write to -

and other favorites obtaminabe at
MAA H A L L'

Marshall's Fountain Deluxe
'Marshall's Rich-Test Malteds"
Finest in town

Don't forget the accessories that add that
ddash of "IT" to your outfit. Sweaters p.00-
$6.95, Blouses $1.98-$3.50, Anklets at 30c

MEN!

Your favorite Pipe and Pipe To-

Ma rshall's

bacco and accessories can be obtained at

SODAS - SUNDAES - SANDWICHES

235 South Mate

Next to State Theatre

A A r'C e IAI IC

il

II

11 V6.---t .-,.L1\L1 LU J .-ttG A .rKL- I

AK' H AI

L I IIl-' IIII~l1lI l w

_____ I

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