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July 24, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-07-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"FhRDAY, JTULY 24, 1942

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

, .. _ __
_..
T

ideal Values'
Are Termed
Peace Aims
~Profs. Agree Concerning
Coals Of Present War
At Informal Roundtable
Three members of the faculty
agreed last night that the replace-
ment of materialistic values with
ideal Values by means of continued
peace, full employment and an in-
creased standard of living were the
desired ends of this war.
1Prof. W. B. Willcox, Prof. H. M.
Dorr and Mr. H. M. Somers expressed
this opinion before a Post-War Coun-
cil audience in an informal round-
table discussion of "The Individual
and the State."
Prof. Dorr said that there is a po-
litical revolution in progress among
peoples of the world to have the gov-
ernment do things that ought to be
done but can't be done individually.
The success or failure of this revolu-
tion all depends on public intelli-
gence in regard to their government.
here is a definite pull toward cen-
tralization in our liberal American
democracy, Prof. Willcox said, and
ourindividual rights are being modi-
fled. Our whole concept of inalien-
able rights will eventually no longer
;exist and we will think of one's
rights only in relative terms.
Mr. Somers said that after the
war we won't be willing to revert to
the old conditions because people
have the idea that it is possible for
everyone to have a job and will de-
mand that the government provide
them with one.
WAR BONDS AND STAMPS
I ON SALE HERE- _

MAJOR LEAGUE RESULTS:
First-Year Managers Sewell,
Ott Compile Splendid Records

Admiral Leahy Assumes New Duties

By HALE CHAMPION
From Associated Press Summaries
Mel Ott has always been. a popular,
albeit silent ball player for the New
York Giants.
Now spending his first year as a
manager Ott has retained his popu-
larity while losing part of his reti-
cence-a happy comoiiation for both
Ott and New York sports writers who
were so long forced to deal with the
big businessman of Coogan's Bluff,
Bill Terry.
Old dependable of the Polo
Grounds for a decade, Ott did
everything demanded of a ball play-
er, and in the bargain was careful
not to do things not liked in a ball
player. He hit home runs, covered
the outer garden without much grace
but with plenty of skill and hidden
speed, and played intelligent, heads
up ball at all times. Off the field,
he thoroughly behaved himself.
Rewarded this year with a man-
agerial post, Ott has concentrated
on something he knows best-power.
With lusty hitters like Johnny Mize;
Babe Barna, Willard Marshall-and
of all people Mel Ott-under his
tutelage he has brought the under-
ratedbGiants into a firm first divi-
sion. berth. It's fourth now, but the
Giants are still going strong and
may give the weak-hitting Reds
some worrisome moments in their
battle for third place. Yesterday it
was the home run parade again for
the Giants as they whipped Pitts-
burgh 6-4 in typical Coogan's Bluff
style._
Another first year manager whose
team is really hitting on all cylinders
is Luke Sewell of the St. Louis
Browns. Of much the same type as
Ott, Sewell has only one strong vari-
ation. His hitters look out for them-
selves--especially Chet Laabs-but
his pitchers work wonders for the
gray-haired ex-catcher.
The Browns won their 13th con-
test in 15 starts yesterday as ,they
lambasted Philadelphia, 9-6, while
Mr. Sewell sat happily in the dugout
gloating over his strengthened fourth
place lead over Detroit's slumping
Tigers.
Senators 5, Tigers 3
Washington . .000 003 011-5 7 0
Detroit . , .....010 000 020-3 10 1
Carrasquel and Evans; Newhouser,
Wilson (9) and Teb1etts.

(9) and Conroy; Dietrich, Haynes
(7) and Turner.
* * *
Browns 9, A's 6
Philadelphia .. .000 050 001-6 10 0
St. Louis ......004 101 30x-9 13 0
Christopher and Swift; Ferrens,
Appleton (5) and Sewell, Ferrell (6).
Is * n
Indians 3, Yanks 2

New York . .011 000 000 00-2
Cleveland . .000 000 002 01-3

8 4
11 0

Bonham, Breuer ( 9), Murphy (10)
and Hemsley; Dean, Heving (10) and
Hegan.
* * *
Pittsburgh .. .031 000 000-4 6 1
New York.....201 030 00x-6 10 0
Sewell and Lopez; Koslo, McGee
(3) and Danning.
* * *
Night Baseball
Cf4 T...qn i nn o C

I<

Wt. LOiUIS......200 010 000-3 0
Philadelphia . .002 020 00x-4 9 1
Gumbert, Dickson (5), L. Moore
(8), White (8) and ,O'Dea; Melton
and Livingstone.
41ajor League Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Admiral William D. Leahy (above), recently ambassador to Vichy,
France, took up a pen at his office in the State Department at Washing-
ton, D.C., to execute one of the first tasks of his new job-Chief of Staff
to President Roosevelt as Commander-in-Chief of U.S. Armed Forces.

W L
New York .......63 29
Boston .........51 39
Cleveland.......52 42
St. Louis ........49 45
Detroit........48 49
Chicago.........38 52
Philadelphia .1...38 61
Washington .....36 58

Pet.
.685
.567
.553
.521.
.495
.422
.384
.383

GB
11
12
15
172
24
28 '2
28

SIDE-SHOW

s

Feature at
1:00 - 3:04
5:20
7:36 - 9:52 P.M.

Games Friday
New York at Detroit
Boston at St. Louis (2) (Twilgt)
Philadelphia at Chicago
Washington at Cleveland
* *m*T

ETATErrlli

NATIONAL LEAGUE

--Today

and Saturday

W L
Brooklyn........64 27
St. Louis ........56 33
New York .......48 43
Cincinnati......47 43
Chicago ........45 49
Pittsburgh ......41 47
Boston .........38 57
Philadelphia . ... 25 65

Pct.
.703
.629
.527
.522
.479
.466
.400
.278

GB
7
16
161/2
2012
21112
28
38 %1

* * *

Boston 5, Chisox 4
Boston, .......100 200 200-5
Chicago....001 030 000-4
Hughson, Brown (5), Judd (9),'

9 2
14 0
Terry

Coming Sunday
RED ELEANOR
SKELTON POWELL
TOMMY DORSEY
"SHIP AHOY"

I

I

BUY STAMPS AND BONDS
Today!! Yet, let us defend your hair
against dandruff too!!
- AIR-COOLED -,
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State and Mich. Theatre

i

a

Games Friday
Cincinnati at New York
Pittsburgh at Brooklyn (twi-
light)
Chicago at Philadelphia (night)
St. Louis at Boston
Union To Present
Clark McClellan
At Dance Tonight
Clark McClellan and his thirteen-
piece Rhythm Club Orchestra re-
turn to the Union Ballroom tonight
to accompany the secend in a series
of summer term informal dances
from 9 to midnight.
Music easy to listed and dance to
will be emphasized throughout the
evening, but there will be a generous
ration of swing to keep the hepcats
happy. Requests for numbers in any
speed are encouraged. The band
will feature this week McClellan's
new arrangement of "Lazy River."
Small Sherlie Sherie; pretty ex-
ponent of the' hypothesis that good
things come in little packages, will
sing throughout the evening. McClel-
lan will demonstrate his skill on the
vibraharp.
Tickets are on sale at the Union.
Get a date as well as a ticket for
the Vnion says, "No Stags, please,"
and means it.

Crow Is Thief.. .
BERGENFIELD, N. J., July 23-(/P)
-Stationer Morris Siwoff sat up
nights trying to think of a way to
trap the invisible petty thief who
snitched the dimes from his store-
front newsstand, but spurned the
pennies.
Then one morning as Siwoff
watched, Gypsy, pet crow of 16-year-
old Bobby Gilies, zoomed out of the
sky, snatched up one of the shiny
coins, and scrammed.
Now Bobby is trying to wean.Gypsy
away from his life of crime.
Coin Shortage .. .
TALLAHASSEE, Fla., July 23-(/P)
-Florida's capital is on the verge of
a small coin shortage because so
many residents have pennies, nickles
and dimes stored away in piggy
banks
One bank today urged in an ad-
vertisement that the small coins be
turned in for bills. The ad said:
"So many pennies, nickles and
dimes are being stored in piggy
banks, fruit jars and old tea pots
that banks are finding it difficult
to furnish merchants, restaurants
and theatres with small change."
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Married couple to act as
cook and porter for fraternity. In-
terested parties call 2-1680 after
7:00 p.m.
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Tan gabardine jacket in vi-
cinity of South Ferry Field Thurs-
day. Reward. Finder call 2-2565.
GREEN PARKER PEN lost on or
near campus Wednesday afternoon.
Pen initialed J.P.H. Reward. Call
2-5561
LAUNDERING

i I

I

LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox
Careful work at low price.

pi
er cct ion in. Modern GoolIn
NOW SHOWING!

I

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