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July 17, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-07-17

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'FlhiIYAY, JULY 17, 1942

T1HE.. MICHIGAN DAILY-.

MAJOR LEAGUE RESULTS:

Russian Machine Gunners 3 last Foe On Southern Front

Browns Continue Rapid Climb
With 5-1 Win Over Philadelphia

Popular Cheesecake' Musicals
In Bad Taste, Meredith Says

By HALE CHAMPION
From Associated Press Summaries
Just when it seems that pennant
races have become polite affairs in
which each team accepts its own
destiny, a spark sets some second
division team on fire. That's the way
it's always been and that's the way
baseball will always be.
Right now Chet Laabs is the spark
and the St. Louis Browns are the
boys with the fiery tinge. The De-
troit castoff slammed his third home
run in two days and his 15th of the
season yesterday as he led Luke Sew-
ell's rejuvenated Browns to a 5-1
victory over the Athletics.
Laabs has now driven in eight runs
in two games, thus furnishing the
power for a club which has swept six
games in a row, and has now risen
within whispering distance of the
first division. If they finally get there
and stay Luke Sewell will have done
what no other manager in the whole
recent unsuccessful string of St. Louis
strategists has been able to accom-
plish.
This drive of the Browns may be
only a flash in the pan, but backed
by recent refinancing, the club looks
to be in the soundest shape of the
last decade. If any man can make
it stick, Luke Sewell can.
"Browns Whip A's
St. Louis 000 021 002 5 8 0
Philadelphia 000 100 000 1 7 0
Hollingworth and Ferrell; L. Har-
ris, B, Harris 9 and Wagner, Swift 9.
* *
Chisox Beat Boston Again
Chicago 002 010 000 3 .6 1
Boston 000 000 200, 2 6 1
Ross, Haynes 9 and Turner; H.
Newsome, Brown 7, Dobson 9 and
Conroy.
Yanks Wallop Indians
Cleveland 002 110 020 5 7 2
New York 330 000 10x 8 11 1
Harder, Milnar 2 and Hegan, Den-
ning 3, Bonham and Rosar.
* * *

Schmitz, Warneke 9 and McCullough.
Brooklyn 000 000 200 2 9 0
Chicago 060 010 000 1 7 1
Allen, Casey 7 and Sullivan, Owen
7; Fleming, Olsen 9 and Hernandez,
McCullough 6.
Night Garnes
AMERICAN
WASHINGTON, July 16. -UP)-
Virgil Trucks, Johnny G'orsica and
Dizzy Trout restricted Washington
to five singles tonight but with the
aid of six Detroit errors turned those
five hits into six runs for a 6 to 5 vic-
tory in 10 innings.
The setback--their fifth straight--
dropped the Tigers into a fourth-
place tie with the St. Louis Browns.
George Case's 10th inning single
with the bases loaded scored Bobby
Estalella from third with the win-
ning run. The blow, a sharp single
to left, came with two out.
The Tiger infield performed a neat
job of scuttling itself. Pinky Higgins
committed three of the six errors
and the final misplay, by Trout, led
to Washington's winning run.
Detroit .......... 010 100 021 0--5
Washington......010 031 000 1-6
S '* * *
NATIONAL
New York ......000 210 000-3 9 0
At Pittsburgh .. 000 000 001-1 7 1
Hubbell and Danning; Butcher
and Lopez.

By BERYL SHOENFIELD
Cheesecake musicals have com-
pletely replaced the serious drama
on wartime Broadway's stage, and
to Charles H. Meredith, guest direc-
tor of the Department of Speech's
current Repertory play, this is "high-
ly regrettable."
Meredith applied his theory that
despite the times a really good non-
comedy is always appropriate, when
he selected Robert Ardrey's story of
World War II' viewpoints, "Thunder
Rock," as second offering of the 14th
annual Repertory Players.
"Straight parts require more act-
ing competency than burlesqued or
comedy roles, since it is much more
difficult to remain poised and na-
tural without benefit of character
make-up or lines."
Hollywood success on the silent
screen is attributed by "Thunder
Rock's modest, soft-spoken director
to his 6 foot 3 inch stature, which
made him a "natural" for lead roles.
From then on, acting engagements
were plentiful, including several sea-
sons with the Washington Square
Players-now the Theatre Guild-as
fellow member with Katherine Cor-
nell and Roland Young.
Three years of European study in
dramatic presentation methods de-
veloped Meredith's directing talent,
and when Irving Pichel-the "voice"
of "How Green Is My Valley"--,of-
fered him the directorship of Cali-
fornia's famed Santa Barbara Play-

Russian infantrymen and machine gunners batt le the foe on asector of the Southern Front, according
to Moscow caption. In center, a nurse aids a wound ed Russian soldier. Marshal Timoshenko's troops were
maintaining a stubborn defense against the German s, in their drive for the Caucasus oil fields.

The Cracker Barrel
By Mike Ban
Daily Sports Editor

Fire College
Leonard E..

Hears
Himler

Lecture On Panic'
Firemen attending the fourteenth
annual Michigan Fire College'yester-
day heard Leonard E. Himler of the
University Health Service describe
the psychology of panic as a mani-
festation of complete emotional de-
moralization.
Emphasizing that men dealing with
panic must make allowance for var-
ious degrees of panic, Dr. Himler de-
clared that the greatest chance for
prevention of serious trouble caused
by panic lies in efficient and prompt
corrective organization.
Capt. Raymond W. Worley of the
Detroit Fire Department also con-
tinued instruction in various special
fire-fighting methods.

Brooks, Cubs Split
Brooklyn 000 000 000
Chicago 001 112 11x
Davis, Kimball 7 and

0 8 2
7 14 1
Owen;

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Cliff Wise Back ...
MICHIGAN'S athletic outlook for
1942-43 season was greatly
strengthened yesterday when big
Cliff Wise, sensational sophomore
baseball and football star, announced
that he will return to school this fall.
Cliff dropped out of school last
summer to work in a defense fac-
tory in Jackson, but since then
has saved enough money to permit
himself to come back to college.
The only catch to the whole picture
is whether Wise can enroll in the
Army Reserve Corps while attend-
ing the University.
The curly-haired athlete was Tom
Harmon's understudy two years ago
and was considered by some to be
the logical successor to the Hoosier
Hammer. Cliff was an excellent kick-
er and the best passer on the 1940
squad.
In the baseball world Wise had
also established a fine reputation.
Starting the 1941 season he was
nothing but a green hurler who
had a lot of stuff and little control.
But by the time the Wolverines had
taken the Big Ten crown he was
one of the most feared pitchers in
the Conference. Right before he
left school Coach Ray Fisher said,
"if that boy would stay another
season or two he would probably
become one of the best pitchers I
have ever coached."
Wise, who is now married, expects
to be a proud papa some time next
fall. He told your columnist that he
would like to score a few touchdowns
just so he could brag to the kid
when it grew older.
1

BOB INGALLS has given up his
one-man campaign to enlist in
the nation's armed forces. The
All-Conference center, who has
poor vision, will probably sign with
the Green Bay Packers, profession
al football team, later in the week.
He would be an unusually safe in-
vestment, considering the fact he
is 4F in the draft.
THE Michigan competitive athletic
front is almost always composed
of men, but this summer a nineteen-
year-old freshman coed from Mus-
kegon is doing more than her share
of publicity-getting for alma mater.
Buxom Sally Sessions is the girl
and the publicity is largely achieved
through Miss Sessions' extraordi -
nary ability to hit a golf ball in the
proper direction at the proper time.
She has just reached the semi-
finals of the Michigan State Wom-'
en's Tournament and the scores
she shot in so doing were enough
to make some of Coach Ray Court-
right's links hopefuls look to their
laurels.
Miss Sessions is not a one-sport
wonder either. Two years ago she
won the state women's novice tennis
title.
More luck to the girl. But let's
hope things don't get so bad that
Fritz Crisler has to use her, at left
half.
CRACKER BARREL: Students en-
rolled in the PEM program have the
priviledge of being trained by one
of the midwest's best tennis players.
Chief Petty Officer George J. Jen-
nings won the public parks singles
title four times in a row and the
doubles five times. He was also a
star in basketball and an excellent
handball player.

M ichg Ninea
To Encounter
N avyRecrutits
The Wolverine nine will pit its
strength against the formidable Na-
val Recruiting Station from Detroit
at 6:30 p.m. today at Ferry Field.
The boys from Detroit are sailing
along with a ten-game winning
streak and should prove to be the
most powerful opponent Michigan
has faced this summer.
Dale Jones, who used to fling for
the Philadelphia Phillies, will prob-
ably be on the mound for the Re-
cruiting Station. Ray Fisher will
start Dick Bodycombe, the boy who
pitched a no-hitter against Blue
Front last week.
When asked what he thought of
Michigan'c chances Fisher said, "The!
pitching this year has been very
good and if we win it will probably
be by the hurling."
So far the Wolverines have been
very weak with the stick. They have
only averaged about four hits a game,
but they have been able to get them
at the right time. The fielding has
not been too well either, but it will
undoubtedly improve.
Michigan's nine will be gunning
for its fourth victory in five starts
in today's game. Let's get a crowd
out there to cheer the boys on to
victory.
Redd The Daily iassi f ieds!

FOR SALE
CORONA Portable Typewriter. Latest
model. Call Mr. Louis at, 6706.
18
LOST and FOUND
MONEY LOST on campus Sunday.
Approximately $50. Reward. Find-
er please call Thor Reykdal, 2-1044.
14
EASTMAN KODAK, size 620, in
black leather case. Lost near
Nickel's Arcade. Reward. Call
Catherine Mosher, 4121, Ext. 2138.
18c
LADY'S navy blue patent leather
fitted purse. Containing identifica-
tion, currency and travelers checks.
Lost on Cedar Bend Drive or Clo-
verleaf Dairy on Broadway. Re-
ward. Return to Mrs. Harryman,
West ,Quadrangle.
RETURN coach ticket Detroit to
New York. Good until August 29.
$11.50. Telephone 5881. 16
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
HELP WANTED
IS THERE any mother who would
like to increase the family income
by caring for two small children
at her home during week-days?
If so please call 2-3998 after 7:30
p.m. 9
SHOWS DAILY at
1-3-5-7-9 PM
Today and Saturday-
a Veronica Lake
Robert Preston
in ParoouE"'s
"THIS GUN
g : FOR HIRE'

FOR RENT

DOUBLE ROOM with adjoining
lavatory. Also single room. Ideal
location for teachers, students or,
campus secretaries. Garage avail-
able. 422 E. Washington. 19c
MAN or WOMAN to work in cafe-
teria 6:30 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. and
12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Also man
to do janitor work in kitchen, 5:30
p.m. to 12:00 midnight. Apply
Personnel Office, University Hos-
'pital. 20c
MISCELLANEOUS
TEACHER of shorthand or type-
writing or bookkeeping to ex-
change services for instruction in
bookkeeping, dictation, typewrit-
ing, dictaphone or calculator.
Hamilton Business College, Wil-
liam at State. Phone 7831 or 4627.
14c

_ _

I

BROOKLYN ...
IT'S SHANGRI-LA.-.
with a "Greenpernt" accent!
P'

I

"r. CLt i j

n

Yes, neighbor, you ...
e ; quiet, self-effacing y004
are a living part and parcel
of the biggest, toughest,
bloodiest war in all the
hard pages of history.
You can't escape it ,You
can't hide out on the moon!
For here is a war EVERY-
BODY is in. The man
behind the plow. The kid
in knee pants. The oldster with the cane;
The housewife with the, market basket.
The white-collar worker. The blue-collar
worker. The girl in the schoolroom.
We're ALL in it-lock, stock, body, and
soul.
If America loses, you lose. If America
goes down (and it can), you go down, too:
And every decent thing goes down with
you . . . that home, that hearth, that
patch of ground, that blessed freedom.
The only way to save these things is to
win the war!
And the only way to win is to out-build,
Qut-gun, out-plane, and out-fight the
enemy-to make him sick at the sound of

LAIRD ALAN
S*CREGAR LADD
Obedcad by FRANK TUTTU

;R

Extra
ROBERT BENCHLEY
"Keeping In Shape"

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