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July 17, 1942 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1942-07-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

TNE MICHIGAN 'DA-11.V

.IMMA'V TTTr _ 144 16Ao

%., .&A V, 11 f1lV1 y

r a lvi%- x. JULY 17, IH-Z

a

t

Redl Declares
U.S. Education
Is Inadequate
Youths Should Have More
Psychological Training,
Says Wayne Professor
Condemning the education plan
of group psychology for producing
snobs, Prof. Fritz Redl, of Wayne
University, told of the greater nec-
essity of wisely using group tech-
niques during war time at the Uni-
versity High School auditorium yes-
terday.
Prof. Redl explained that the ado-
lescent during a war needed more
psychological aid than his younger
or draft-age brothers. "Life is highly
dramatized and there is an important
part for everyone except the adoles-
cent. Teachers must recognise this
and plan programs involving the
natlonal situation," he said.
Schools Have Failed
"The schools have failed because
the teachers work with a group try-
ing to reach the individual. The
group often times does not fit the
needs of the individual. The child
from the slums is out of place in both
his home group and the one at
school," Prof. Redl commented.
The need for psychological facili-
ties during a war are increased, but
the facilities themselves are de-
creased, therefore schools should util-
ize and exploit present facilities," he
said. Schools have previously failed
by emphasizing intellectual growth'
even if the result was a snob, a social
failure, was his comment.
Youth'Needs Security
He described the youth as needing
security as provided by the group,
but, also needing the variety and
stimulation that groups can add. He
said the twofold purpose of the group
was to curb the impulse of youth
while stmulating the controls of
youth thereby producing an interest-
ing individual.
Prof. Redl told o the many inade-
quacies of adults when dealing with
adolescents. "They attempt to lec-
ture rather than advise, especially
when they themselves do not under-
stand the problem."
High School Band
To Broadcast Two
Radio Programs
The High School Clinic Band will
present the first of two radio pro-
grams at 3:15 p.m. today over station
WJR. The second program will beI
broadcast next Friday at the same1
time.,
Prof. William D. Revelli will con-
duct the Clinic Band, and Cleo FoxI
of Kalamazoo and Mac Carr of River
Rouge will act as guest conductors.
George Irwin will announce the pro-
gram.I
The band will play "Varsity" as at
theme, and the broadcast will in-
clude the Prelude from "Fugue in(
G Minor" by Bach, "Three NegroI
Dances" by Florence Price and "Cas-
tillia," a borero by Holmes.i

II

-1

WAA Sponsors
First Summer
HostelGroup
Two modes of transportation -
walking and bicycling - will con-
serve tires, besides providing the
means of getting to the Saline Valley
farms by the Hostel group tomorrow.
The first organized hostel trip of
the summer, sponsored by W.A.A.,
will leave from the W.A.B. at 1 p.m.
All students are invited.
Located three miles south of Saline
on the Saline highway twelve miles
from Ann Arbor, the farms provide
places for picnics and swimming. Run
on a cooperative basis, the Farms
can be explored by the students. Food
will be purchased there.
Passes for the whole group have
been arranged for a fee of 25 cents.
Individual passes entitle the holders
to use any of the national hostels.
Michigan is located in the Great
Lakes region with neighboring hos-
tels at Chelsea, Detroit and Man-
chester.
More familiar in the East, hostel-
ing is comparatively new in the mid-
west. The movement is gaining im-
petus because of its cheap and
healthful qualities, and more hostels
are being established. This inexpen-
sive way of touring was first popular
in Europe and then spread to the
Americas. There are now centers in
Canada, Mexico, Central and South
America.
W.A.A. is sponsoring this activity
to encourage more students to enjoy
the out-of-dors. Miss Marie Hartwig
of the Women's Phy. Ed. dept, said
the University group would probably
meet other groups and that the main
reason for the hostel movement is to
train youth in independence and
self-discipline.
Dan Saulson,. '44, will read the
tout. The coed group will return to
Ann Arbor Sunday morning.
Education Meet
StartsMonday
Third Annual Conference
Planned For Teachers
The School of Education wil lpre-
sent its Thirteenth Annual Summer
Education Conference planned for
teachers and school executives Mon-
day through Friday in University
High School. The conference direc-
tor will be Dr. J. B. Edmonson, Dean
of the School of Education.
The conference program consists
of a series of lectures on educational
problems supplemented by round-
table conferences on guidance, read-
ing, war problems and related topics.
A special conference on Instructional
Problems of the Elementary School
will be conducted throughout the
week by Dr. Katherine B. Greene
for elementary school teachers and
parents of children from five to thir-
teen years old.
Thursday, the School of Education
Guidance Workshop and Curriculum
Workshop will present a separate
guidance conference for educators
interested in guidance problems.

Soldier Watches Shell Burst In Egypt

i

7=:7m=

Reporter Sees
Darkened City
From Tower
Continued from Page t)
for a fast-moving Axis bomber. Ap-
parently an air raid warden was on
the job, for the glow was suddenly
snuffed off a minute after it was
first observed.
In the middle of the blackout a
freight train rolled through the
Michigan Central Railroad station
with no lights.
Barricades on the edge of town
stopped all cars. Five hundred and
sixty-five auxiliary police and 255
wardens saw duty in the township,
Police Chief Mortenson informed
The Daily last night.
Observers from the air saw "few
lights" and said the war plants
"stood out like a sore thumb." The
Willow Run bomber plant could be
seen in Ypsilanti, "lighted up like a
big Roman candle."
After fifteen minutes of a death-
like silence, Ann Arbor slowly came
to life. First, the dorms shot up with
lights from every window. Some ob-
servers from the Carillon Tower
weren't sure but they thought the
first building to light up was the
West Quad.
On Liberty Street, the huge mar-
quee of the Michigan Theatre next
flashed into brilliant light, splashing
grotesque color on thin walking dolls
which suddenly took on the form of
living people. Toy automobiles turn-
ed on headlights and soon State
Street was humming with normal
activity again.
Downtown Ann Arbor was a little
slow in lighting up but ten minutes
after tkhe whistles had sounded the
all-clear signal nobody would have
known that the city had just passed
its first blackout test successfully.

'Beachcomber's Ball' Is Theme
Of Tonight's Dance At League

"Adrift in the Tropics" will be all
those who attend the Beachcombers'
Ball in the League ballroom this eve-
ning from 9 p.m. to midnight. As
might be guessed from the title this
will be a highly informal affair to
which the guests may add still more
color by coming in their most shift-
less-looking, comfortable old clothes.
The Beachcombers-for-a-night and
their belles will dance to Gordon
Hardy's Orchestra fronted by Doc
Spracklin. Tonight the orchestra
will feature for the first time the
vocalizing of a brand new Harmony
Quartet: Doc Spracklin, Bob Rob-
erts, Bill Henline and Charlie Good-
ell. The trial appearance of the
quartet was received with such en-
thusiasm last week that it has pre-
pared several songs for tonight and
evenings to come.
Also featured will be the Dixie-
land "band within a band," which
will add a still warmer touch to the
tropic setting by tearing into a jam
session for the delight of all swing
enthusiasts. The Dixielanders in-

elude Don Whitehead on the drums,
Frosh Deedier, bass, Lou Hurd, pi-
ano, Toon Snyder, sax, Bill Herline,
trombone and Charlie Goodell, trum-
pet.
Everybody on campus, dated or
dateless, is invited to be present at
the Beachcombers' Ball. The spirit
of informal gaiety will be promoted
when everybody will be given an op-
portunity to join in the one-two-
three kick of the twisting conga
chain.
Stag are urged to confine their
cutting in to the staff of coed host-
esses, who can be identified by their
crepe paper hair hows. Tonight's
hostess contingent includes: Alice
Howard, Edna Russell, Elizabeth
Hawley, Helen Westie, Harriet Ram-
say, Josephine Clancy, Jane Scholes.
Margaret Krull. Mary Lou Knapp,
Merry Hefferman and Kay Allaire.
Hostesses are requested to meet in
the undergraduate offices at 8:45.
Tomorrow evening's dance will be
themeless.

t

An Australian soldier, almost hidden in a foxhole (foreground),
peers out toward a shellburst near El Alamein, Egypt. This is a British
official picture radioed from Cairo to New York.

Prof. Hill Urges Development
Of South American Products

A dv er tis ed
1A~r-

By RAY DIXON '
"With American development of
non-competitive products in Latin
America lies the opportunity for
greater Pan-American cooperation,"
Prof. Lawrence F. Hill of the history
department at Ohio State University
said yesterday.
"It is quite possible for the United
States to'aid in the development of.
a great many tropical products that
would not be competitive," Prof. Hill
stated. "Tropical fruits, coconuts and
iron ore exist in vast quantities in
South America and there is a great
possibility for development with cap-
ital and ingenuity," he said.
Prof. Hill spoke on "Economics and
the Future of Pan-Americanism" be-
fore a University lecture audience.,
"The United States made two mis-'
takes in the attempt to bring into ex-
istence more amicable relations with
South America," he declared. The
program was well conceived, but was
handicapped by economic and politi-
cal handling of protectorates (such
as Santo Domingo) which the United
States established in South America.
This economical and political pro-
tection of the U.S. aroused bitter
resentment, especially in Argentina
and Chili," Prof. Hill said.
The second error in establishing
U.S.-Latin American relations "was
the erection of high tariff walls by
the United States between itself and
the South American countries." Since
President Hoover's administration
the U.S. has been trying to rectify
this "enormously unfortunate" poli-
cy, he said.
"Brazil has practically every na-
tural resource in the world, including
23 percent of the iron ore, and al-
most unlimited coal and water power
to develop them," Prof. Hill stated.
"The rubber rplant was originally
taken from Brazil by Dutch and

British capitalists and adapted to the
East Indies, where they gained a vir-
tual monopoly. There is no reason
why South America (to which the
plants are indigenous) cannot pro-
duce rubber with a little scientific
experimentation," he declared.
"One of the reasons that Argen-
tina and Chile have been lukewarm
to Pan-American relations with the
U.S. is that economical arrangements
haven't been pleasant," he continued.
"Both these countries produce goods
that we have a surplus of and selfish
groups in this country have been
opposed to trade relations with them.
There is no good reason why the U.S.
shouldn't accept some of their goods,
such as flax, or why a three-cornered
arrangement to sell wheat to Latin
American thousands who do not eat
wheat bread could not be worked
out," he stated.
'Blackout' City Seen
From Police Car
(Continued from Page 1)
his car. We took his license number
because he was smoking.
At 10:44 we were at Main and
William again and with the first
notes of the all-clear an over-anxious
storekeeper flashed on his neon sign.
It suddenly went off, but when the
all-clear was unmistakable it flashed
on. Main Street suddenly became a
flare of light which hurt our eyes.
We could see a chef throwing ham-
burgers onto a hot grill in Hillbilly
and then we knew it was all over.
Arid when all the lights came on, like
a sputtering Christmas tree string,
we saw hundreds of people step out
of doorways-Ann Arbor had come
back to life again.

}#

July
SUMMER
SHEERS,
CREPES,

Sale

I
S
C
N
B
C
C
P
N
B
c
C
s
c
p
c
b
n
d
-

Thursday's Results
New York 3, Pittsburgh 1
Cincinnati 7, Boston 6
Brooklyn 0-2, Chicago 1-2
Friday's Games
New York at Pittsburgh
Broklyn at Chicago
Philadelphia at St.Louis
Only games scheduled
AMERICAN LEAGUE

W
Brooklyn .......59
t. Louis ........50
Cincinnati ......46
New York .......43
Chicago ........42
Pittsburgh ......38
Boston ........37
Philadelphia .....2

L
24
30
39
42
46
43
53
60

Pct.
.711
.625
.541
.506
.477
.469
.411
.268

GB
7 f2
14
17
191/2
20
251/2
361/
GB
71/2
9/2
13%/2
131/2
20
231/2
241/2

V
650

Originally $4.95 and 1.,95

w
rew York.......57
Boston .......49
'leveland.......49
Detroit.........45
t. Louis.......43
'hicago........36
?hiladelphia ....36
Mashington .....32

L
28
35
39
45
43
47
56
54

Pet.
.671
.583
.557
.500
.500
.434
.391
.372

C;O N N IE S H OES
SPECS! SANDALS! PUMPS!
ALL-WHITES! WHITES with
COLOR! All heel heights
and sizes included!

s I
,.

4

Hundred Draftees Leave

J~ico on 4 -

More than 100
lassified under
oard No. 1, left
horning for the
lutionstation in

Ann Arbor men,
Selective Service
by bus early this
Federal draft in-
Detroit.

Major League Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

t'

A1('tAV1 CtOn~tA if 111 -rnI VU

I J

PAIRS

. al . r.r

I

1/2 Price

PRINTS
Misses' and Women's Sizes

Lightweight

i
i

QUdi
9,0,

Prh

pilt
icej /

w

Working on a production line -
Sunfunning - Bicycling - Picni
ing - Catching a few hours of pla
Hop into these sturdy, comfortab
clothes - they're cool, made f
free and easy action ...ttracti,

as they are practical. At down-to-
earth practical prices, too!

}, f .:

c-
y.
le
or
i e

WOOL COflT

4

S

$1995

Formerly to $29.95

Sizes 10-18

The National
er Cullotte Dr
Striped Chami
$7.95.

Golf-
ress of
5ray at

SHORTS ... from $2.00
Cotton Dresses . . from $4.00
Special Groups at $5.95 and $7.00
One Special Group of
Slack Suits at $2.49
SLACKS . .. of Fall kinds and
colors . . . from $3.00
SLACK SUITS. ... from $4.00
OVERALLS and PLAY SUITS
... from $3.00
SHORTS at $2.00
SHIRTS from $1.50 up.

Better Dresses,
including Eisenberg Originals,

CULOTTES with
the comfort of a
Slack, the look of a

II 'LII' I

I

i

I ww;61

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