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June 26, 1940 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1940-06-26

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T, 3TNI 26,I1940,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY,

PACE THREE

S a

Flight Training
Ground Classes
OpenSessions
Four Positions Are Open
In Elementary Course;
Flying To Start Friday
With ground school work in full
swing, 56 students enrolled in the
University's division of the Civil
Aeronautics Flight Training pro-
gram will begin dual instruction in
the air Friday.
Advance or secondary courses of-
fered by the CAA will also be given
here this summer. The five best
qualified students of last semester's
primary course will be selected for
this special training.f
A full quota of 60 students has
been allotted the University and
several openings are still to be filled
in the primary training course. Ap-
plicants must be able to pass a strict
physical examination must have
completed two years of college work.
Further registration will be taken
by Prof. William W. Gilbert, direct-
or of the program, in Room 2047,
E. Engineering Building.
The training program here in-
cludes two hours of preliminary work
in the Link trainer, a ground course
in the fundamentals of aviation and
fonI 35 to 50 hours of flight training.
Graduates of the course will receive
a private operator's license, and
there is no fee attached to the course.
MEAD THE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS!

Grand Illusion' To Be Offered
By Art Cinema League Here

Famous French Movie
Is Second In Series
To Be Presented Here
Second of the four films to be
shown by the Art Cinema League
this summer will be "Grand Illusion,"
the French movie picked by the Na-
tional Board of Review of Motion
Pictures as the best film of 1939 to
be produced in any country.
"Grand Illusion" will be shown
here at 8:30 p.m. Sunday, July 14, in
the amphitheatre of the Rackham
School. Admission will be by ticket
only.
Art Cinema League memberships,
admitting the holder to each of the
four summer programs, are being
sold this week only at $1 each in.
the Union, the League and Wahr's
book store. No tickets will be sold
for individual performances during
the summer. Summer Session stu-
dents are urged to procure their
memberships before the supply is
exhausted.
Documentary Files Listed
The other three programs will be
the American documentary film, fea-
turing "The River," "The City," "The
Plough That Broke the Plains," and
"New Schools for Old," to be shown
this Sunday; the Russian film; "T/e
Childhood of Maxim Gorky"; and
"Kameradschaft," an example of the
German film. Selected short sub-
jects will be included.
"Grand Illusion" is directed by the
celebrated Jean Renoir and stars the
famous French actors, Eric von Stro-
heim, Jean Gabin, Pierre Fresnay
and Dita Parlo. A war story with
no battle scenes, the movie is baser
on Director Renoir's. own experiences
in World War prison camps.
Plays Important Role
Dita Parlo, a refugee from Ger-
many's Third Reich, plays one of
the most moving parts, that of a
widowed German mother who gives
shelter to two French soldiers who
have escaped prison camp. Fresnay
nd von Stroheim, as French and
German aristocrats respectively, por-
tray the passing during the war of
the old European hierarchy of the
classes, each serving in the army of

1

'fT) PARLO - - - - Feature Actor
his country. Gabin is cast as a man
of the. people, whose escape from
prison camp is bought at the price
of Fresnay's life and who finds love
when Sheltered by Miss Parlo.
The film has met with great suc-
cess on previous showings in this
country. It ran for 16 weeks in New
York and enjoyed similar runs in
other large cities. While the dialogue
is in French, German' and English,
sub-titles in English are included.
Miss Ellis To Lead
Classes In Dancing
The two classes in modern dance
given during the Summer Session will
this year be under the direction of
Helen Ellis, of the women's physical
education department.
Miss Ellis is eminently qualified for
this type of work, having studied the
dance and having been a member
of a well-known professional dance
troupe. She is a graduate of New
York University and attended the
Bennington School of Dance for. a
time. Later she worked with the
celebrated Martha Graham, who has
appeared in Ann Arbor several times,
and was a member of the Hanya
Holme troupe.

'Weddings
Engagements
The marriage of two University
students took place at 7 p.m. Mon-
day, June 24, in the rectory of St.
Thomas church in Ann Arbor. The
bride was Marian A. McAmbley,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence
F, McAmbley, of Rochester, N.Y., i
and the bridegroom was John J. I
Carroll, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leo A.
Carroll, of Middletown, N.Y.
Mr. Carroll is accessions assistant
in the order department of the Uni-
versity Library, and Mrs. Carroll was
formerly employed in the library's
catalogue department.
Williams- Staebler Rites
The wedding of Helen Marquidt
Williams and Arthur Eugene Staeb-
ler, '38, was performed by The Rev.
Paul Wuerfel, who is the grandfather
of the bridegroom, at noon yesterday
at the Staebler home.
Mrs. Staebler, who is the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Williams, of
Columbus, O., was graduated from
the University of Ohio in 1938. She
received her masters degree here and
is working at present on her doctor
of philosophy degree, as is Mr. Staeb-
ler.
Only the immediate families of the
couple were present at the simple
ceremony. The pair left yesterday for
a trip through Northern Michigan
and will resume their studies at the
University in the fall.
Ayres, Kossack Wed
Elizabeth P. Ayres, '38, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Ayres, was
Imarried at 4:30 p.m. Monday, June
24, to Dr. Carl Frederick Kossack,
of Eugene, Ore., son of Mr. and Mrs.
Walter Kossack of Los Angeles. The
ceremony was performed in the chap-
el of the Michigan League by Dr.
Leonard Parr.
The bridesmaids were Margaret H.
Ayres, '40, and Helen J. Ayres, both
sisters of the bride. Assisting Or.
Kossack were Edgar Bagley as best
man, and Theodore Gibson, Jr., '41,
and Franklin C. Basler, '41BAd,
ushers.
Earl Stevens Will Play
At Tea Dance In League
First of the Summer Session tea
dances will be from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
today in the Main Ballroom of the
League.
Earl Stevens and his orchestra
will play for these dances, and stu-
dents and faculty may come with or
without partners. There will be hos-
tesses at the dance. Mary Ellen
Wheeler, '41Ed, said the tea dances
were being continued because of
their great popularity last summer.
No admission will be charged.

Sports Facilities Open To Women

Sports facilities open to the woman ical education department, has an-
Summer Session student cover a nounced.
wide range of ground, from swim- Other facilities open for use are the
ming in the men's Union Pool twice putting green and the practice golf
weelyto bay glf oure (hre lcourse at Palmer Field, Couzens HBall
weekly, to a baby golf course (three and the Observatory had best look
holes, no less) at Palmer Field. to their windows. Hours for golfing
From 11 a.m. to noon, and from on the course, as well as those for
8:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesdays and the archery practice range will be
Thursdays, the Union Pool will be announced soon, Dr. Bell said. The
open to women for recreational 12 clay and four cement tennis courts
swimming sessions. And if Ann at Palmer Field will be open daily
and Sunday.
Arbor weather follows its usual Tuesday and Thursday evenings,
course, there will be treading room ttsdwy of Tuly 8sents
I only.starting the week of July 8, students

Ul.
All the Summer Session sports
will be under the direction of the
W.A.A. coaching staff, and instruc-
tors will be available for any casual
players wishing leessons, Dr. Mar-
garet Bell, head of the women's phys-

may play games and receive instruc-
tion in badminton at Waterman
Gymnasium-another men's building
ruthlessly invaded.
At the Women's Athletic Building
there are two lounges; rest rooms,

locker rooms which contain 60
showers and as many dressing rooms,
and kitchen facilities. Rainy days
will see the students scurrying to
the indoor golf cages and archery
range in the basement of the build-
ing.
The terrace, adjoining the lounge,
will be of summer lounge use to the
student who has designs on a coat of
tan acquired the lazy way.
The small pool in Barbour Gym-
nasium will be the headquarters for
beginning swimmers, and the correc-
tive room on the main floor will be
devotedbtotbody conditioning classes
-the better to remove spare tires,
m'dear.
Equipment may be rented at the
Woman's Athletic Building for golf,
archery, tennis and volley ball.

_ _ _ _

A MARVELOUS SAVING
ON SHOES YOU'VE BEEN
WANTING TO BUY!

ALL OF OUR REGULAR
$~SUMMER SHOES
Nationally Advertised
Nationally Famous Brands

MICH IGAN,
NOW -
SPENCER
"Edison
the Man"

Trade names you'll recognize on
sight! Gorgeous shoes you need
for the rest of the summer.
KID! MARACAIN! ELASTI-
CIZED LEATHERS! LINEN!
All heel heights! All sizes in-
cluded!

$394

Matinees
2 - 3:50
255

Nights
7:00 - 9:00
35c

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Thursday
MAXWELL ANDERSON'S PULITZER
PRIZE WINNING COMEDY
"Saturday's
Children"
John Garfield

Just 100 Pairs PLAY SHOES-$2 and $3 values
CAPESKIN MOCCASINS! WEDGES! WHITE with COLOR! COM-
BINATION COLORS. All sizes included! 9
Entire Stock of SPECTATORS - Regular $5 3 I
Brown 'n White - Blue 'n White - Black 'n White36
COLLEGIATE SHOE SHOP

(Continued from Page 2)
Salary Range: $150-190, July 12.
Worker Analyst I, Salary Range:
$150-190, July 12.
Complete announcements on file
at the University Bureau of Appoint-

Ming
i.i

ments and Occupational Information,
201 Mason Hall. Office hours: 9-12
and 2-4.
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information
Mail for Students, Faculty, and
temporary residents at the Univer-
sity: All students and new members
of the faculty should call at the U.S.
Post Office and make out pink card,
"Order to Change Addreses," Form
22, if they have ot already done so.
This applies also to temporary resi-
dents in Ann Arbor who may be doing
reference or research work on the
Campus.
Unidentifiable mail is held in Room
1 University Hall. If you are expect-
ing mail which you have not received,
please call at Room 1, . University
Hall, and make inquiry.
Athropology 183 (Recording and
analysis of a living language), which
is listed as meeting MW, will hence-
forth meet WF at the same hour.

. .

1111

i ___

I

The Daily, Calls

For

Tryouts ....

The Michigan Daily presents a real
opportunity for summer session stud-

I

I

ents to

orain

practical

experience

in

many phases of newspaper advertising
work. All Those interested should re-
port at the Student Publications Build-

ing on Maynard Street.

IIR

I IHII

II I I I

111 I

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