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June 27, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1939-06-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, J

Hall Slayer Is
Prison Parolee
Of Short Time
Convict Confesses Murder
Of Detroit Oil Promoter
To GrandRapids Police
LANSING, Mich., June 26-(A)-
Investigators of the mysterious hitch-
.aiker's killing of George G. Hall, De-
,roit oil promoter, slain by a bullet
while riding in his automobile last
Thuisday, announced tonight a 32-
year-old paroled convict had con-
fessed the shooting.
State Police Captain Ira A. Mar-
mon, co-director of the inquiry into
the fantastic story, said that Daniel
M. Ient, scaifaced former Michigan
State Prison inmate, admitted shoot-
ing the 50-year-old business man-
less than four months after being
granted a parole.
Officers seized Kent in Grand
Rapids, Mich., today and the con-
fession, Captain Marmon said, fol-
lowed a few hours after Hall's com-
panion on his fatal ride, blonde Ruby
Doty, 32, had sobbed out her tale of
the killing at a coroner's inquest.
The hitch-hiker, whom Hall took
into his car near Grand Rapids,
shot him through the left lung, after
his benefactor had died andhehad
disposed of the body in a roadside
ditch, the killer made love to Miss
Doty, she said, and released her hours
later on promise of a "date."
Chief of Detectives Albert Scheiern
of Grand Rapids said Kent asserted
"I killed him to get his money."
The robber-killer got. $10 from
Hall's body, adding to his meager
plunder the dead man's watch and
ring.
"I never saw Hall or the woman
who was with him before," Scheiern
said the ex-convict told him.
hKent's record dates back to boy-
hood days when he stole chickens
and was generally delinquent. Sen-
tenced to prison in 1934 for automo-
bile theft, he escaped in a. guard's '
car in 1935 while serving the two
and half to five-year term but was
captured, in Chicago and returned.
Given an additibnal one and a half'
to four years for the escape, Kent was
paroled last March. 7.
Capt. Laurence Lyon, of State'
Police, disclosed that he had found
a perfect finger print of the middle
finger of the left hand on a door
handle of the car in which the slay-
ing occurred and that the print was
that of Kent.
Captain Marmon said that Kent
would be taken to St. Johns from
Lansing tomorrow morning for ar-
raignment on a mureder charge be-
fore Justice William J. Black and
that if Kent waived examination he
would be arraigned immediately be-
fore Circuit Judge Kelly S. Searl. ;
The tip that led to Kent's arrest+
was provided by a Lansing woman.,

Horace H. Rackhamr School For Graduate Studies

Japs Continue
To Blockade
Negotiations May Settle
Concession Dispute
(Continued from Page 1)
the blockade and made a series of
further demands upon the British;
In contrast to the rumors of at-
tempts at a settlement, there was
current a report that local Japanese
military authorities were preparing
for an even more strict blockade.
This report, also unconfirmable,
said that stricter measures would be
enforced next Friday if the British
had not by then complied with a'
demand presented by Mayor Wen last
Saturday for "cfloser cooperation," of
foreigners with the Chinese section
of Tientsin, over which the Japanese
military rules.
British military authorities have
taken sharp exception to action of
the Japanese soldiery late Monday
afternoon in holding up a British
military truck seeking to enter the
concession with foodstuffs from Chi-
nese areas for the British garrison in
the concession.
The Japanese held the British
vehicle for one hour while officers of
the two forces argued. The Japanese
insisted the British were "not su1f-
ficiently identified," while the Bri-
tish recalled the Japanese military
declaration when the blockade be-
gan that the personnel of the vxi-
ous foreign garrisons and their niain-
tenance would not be interferred
with.
Chinese members of the British
and French Concession, municipal
police whose families live in Japanese
controlled areas received another
threat against their own lives and
those of their families.

Most recent and most sumptuous of University buildings, the Rackham Building not only houses the Gradu-
ate School, but also serves as a social center and auditoriumn for University Lectures-

Thirteen Years Of Struggle End'
In Joy As Soloman Wins Ph.D.

By STAN M. SWINTON
Thirteen years ago a Negro porter
in a downtown Detroit hotel decided
he wanted a college degree. This'
month he was awarded a Ph.D. in
political science by the University.
And therein lies a story.
When Thomas Ralph Soloman
made that decision to go on with the
college work he had dropped after
two years at Talladega College. a
Negro institution run by the Ameri-
can Missionary Association at Talla-
dega, Ala., he knew that there was
a terrible economic struggle ahead.
But Soloman felt the reward was
worth the sacrifice and when he
passed in front of the crowded stands
at Ferry Field this month to receive
his degree and knew that a teach-
ing position at a Negro college in -the
South awaited him, he was convinced
he had taken the right path.
The struggle started in 1926. He
began to take classes at Wayne Uni-
versity in Detroit, working four hours
in the early afternoon as a substitute
postal clerk and from 11 p.m. to 6
a.m. in a Detroit creamery. He had
a wife to support-it was to marry
that he abandoned his college course
in the South-and there were chil-
dren coming. But Soloman managed
to keep up his college work.
In 1929, however, he won his de-
gree from Wayne and, to make things
complete, he was awarded a full-time
postal clerkship at $1,700 a year. But

he decided not to stop there and so
four more years of 1.tle sleep and
much work followed until, in 1933,
Wayne awarded him a Masters de-
gree. What now? he asked himself.
The decision was a difficult one
but his overwhelming urge to com-
plete his education drove him on.
Working five days a week in the
Roosevelt Park Annex of the Detroit
Postoffice, he decided to move to Ann
Arbor. Tuesday and Thursday he
would spend in the classroom here.
The other five days he commuted to
Detroit. By that time his familythad
grown. Today, at 34, he has three
boys ranging from 10 to 13 in age.
Six more years of work were capped
with success and a 209-page thesis
on "The Negro In Detroit Elections,"
a dramatic plea for racial equality
in politics, won him his Ph.D. The
struggle was ended.

japs Warn Foreigners
SHANGHAI, June 27.-(Tuesday)
-(')-Japanese naval officials ad-
vised foreign consuls today that Ja-
panese were launching offensives
against the ports of Foochow and
Wenchow and requested all foreign
ships to withdraw from them.
The request was directed both at
commercial vessels and men of war.1
The announced offensives were in
line with Japan's drive to close all
coastal gateways

,. : -

t,

III

==

MICHIGAN
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CHICAGO SUNDAY TRIBUNE
Same as Delivered to Homes in Chicago

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