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July 03, 1937 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1937-07-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, JULY 3, 1937

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

PAGE THREE

NEWS
Of The DAY

Chinese Course
Offered Here
For First Time
Dr. George Kennedy Leads
Class Of 20 In Modern
Chinese Reading

Roosevelt And Bride Pose W ith Parents After

Marriage

Over Half Of Students Found
Vietims Of Allergic Disease
Case histories covering 19,000 pa- however, that a cure is a slow process
tients in the last five years indicate and that continued injections over a
that more than 50 per cent of all stu- number of years can result only in
comparative immunity. Files are
dents in the University are in need of filled with numerous letters from stu-
treatment for allergic diseases, Dr. dents who were suffering badly from

(By The Associated Press)
Authorities Check Aliens
For Riot Investigation
IRONWOOD, Mich., July 2.-(U)-
Law enforcement officers yatrolled
highways in this lumberjack strike
area today as authorities began a
check to identify aliens among the
52 men arrested after a riot at Mar-
enisco last Wednesday.
No further disturbance was report-
ed and arraignment of the men was
deferred pending the investigation.
Police said that 33 of the men,
seized as 300 strikers fought state
police and sheriff's deputies, were
aliens. The battle started as five
logging trucks attempted to drive
through pickets.

d
P.

(Continued from Page 1)

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f

Major Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

New York .....
Chicago......
Detroit ........
Boston ........
Cleveland.....
Washington
St. Louis .....
Athletics.....

W. L.
. 40 22
37 27
S35 28
. 32 26
. 30 29
. 29 33
. 21 39
20 40

Pct.
.645
.578
.556
.552
.548
.468
.354
.333

graph of its own. Because the ideo-
graphs contain no correlation between'
sound and form or between form
and concept the student of Chinese
must master three independent pro-
cesses in learning the Chinese word,
Dr. Kennedy said. "He must memor-
ize and be able to recognize as a unit
the sign that represents the work. Toj
this sign he must attach in quite ar-
bitrary fashion a monosyllabic sound.
Lastly he must link with the sign or
the sound or both, the mental concept
for which all this is merely a convey-
ance."
"The learning of ideographs is thus
the fundamental problem, Dr. Ken-
nedy continued, "in the study of
gwritten Chinese.1
rCommenting on the number of ideo-j
2 graphs necessary to an excellent com-I
g mand of the language Dr. Kennedy
g said that mastery of 4,000 might be
0 reckoned as a highly educated vo-
3 cabulary in China (There is a total of
about 40,000 ideographs in the lan-
guage-The New Oxford Dictionary
of English is composed of more than
400,000 words), but it is commonly
thought that 2,500 signs will suffice
for a comfortable reading of the
newspapers and a more or less ade-
quate job can be done on 1,000 ideo-
graphs. As an adequate working vo-
cabulary for beginning students of
the language, Dr. Kennedy suggested
L. a properly selected list of 1,200 ideo-
5 graphs which might be expected to
5 cover more than 90 per cent of ordi-
5 nary text material.

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cigarettes.

discover the material responsible and
to prescribe a regimen for relief.
Similar treatment would cost in the
neighborhood of $100 elsewhere.
Diagnosis is made by a series of
scratch tests which, determine the,
sensitivity of the individual to more
than 180 different substances. When
a secondary examination is required
90 more tests are administered.
Relief has been brought to many
thousands of students during the five
years that the clinic has been in op-
eration. Dr. Jimenez emphasized

Buenaventura Jimenez, head of the
sensitization clinic at the Health Serv-
ice, stated yesterday.-
Diseases such as hay fever, asthma
and some cases of eczema, indigestion,I
sinus and sick headaches, can be re-
lieved by the free treatment available1
at the clinic, continued Dr. Jimenez.I
Such disease, may be caused by the
irritating effects of anything fromi
cats and feather pillows to beer and1

The clinic attempts to 1,

hayfever and asthma and were en-
abled to continue in school after
treatment.
Special diets are prepared for pa-
tients who show positive tests, and
they are warned away from certain
kinds of clothing, pillows and face
powder.
Experiments show that sensitivity
is, on the whole, an individual mat-
ter. Different foods affect different
people in different ways, he said.
"Some substances seem to affect al-
most everyone who is at all allergic,
however. Whole wheat brand, given
to 500 students sensitive to other
tests, received a positive reaction from
85 per cent of them. Only about 15
per cent were affected by white bread.
"Apparently there is a definite .se-
quence which these diseases follow
from the mild to the more virulent
type," Dr. Jimenez said, "100 per
cent improvement can be had in the
former, but we can only relieve the
more serious ones.

After the ceremony at Little Christ Church, near Wilmington, Del., which united Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr.,
and Ethel DuPont in marriage, th2 ridE and groom posed with their parents at Owl's Nest, the DuPont estate.
Left to right: Mrs. Eleanor Rose velt, President Roose vei4. Ethel DuPont Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, Jr.,
Mrs. Eugene DuPont and Eugene Dupont.

FOUR DAYS ONLY!
STARTING

GAMES TODAY
Chicago at St. Louis -
New York at Washington
Philadelphia at Boston
Detroit at Cleveland
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Washington 8,aNew York 3.
Boston 8, Philadelphia 4
St. Louis 4, Chicago 2.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)

Chicago ....
Newv York . .
St. Louis ...
Pittsburgh
Brooklyn
Boston .....
Cincinnati
Phillies.

W.
40
. . .....40
35
.... . .35
28
27
24
24

L.
24
25
27
28
34
37
38
40

Pct.
.625
.615~
.565
.556C
.452
.442
.3 87
.375

G
2
2
7
5

GAMES TODAY
Boston at New York
Brooklyn at Philadelphia
Pittsburgh at Chicago
St. Louis at Cincinnati
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 8, Pittsburgh 7
New York 6, Boston 2
Brooklyn 2, Philadelphia 0.
Woman Stays In Bed
Without Food 2 Days
Police revealed yesterday they were
called to 732 Packard Street Thurs-
day to rescue a 76-year-old Ann Ar-
bor woman, Mrs. Frances E. Ban-
croft, who had been in bed without
food or medical care since Tuesday
when she was taken ill.
The rescue resulted when a neigh-
bor, Mrs. Gale E. Mullison, 727 Pack-
ard Street, called police, and stated
that she had not seen her neighbor
for two days.
NEA CHOOSES NEW YORK
DETROIT, July 2.-(IP)-New York
City was selected today by the Na-
tional Education Association for its
1938 convention.

County Board
Sets Property
At 70 Millions
The Washtenaw County board of
supervisors ended its June meeting
Thursday by the adoption of a com-
mittee report which set the county's
equalized property valuation at $70,-
847,911. An earlier report which set
the valuation at $77,635,519 was re-
jected by a vote of 19 to 10.
The committee had sought to raise
the valuation with the end in view of
gaining more state aid for the county
schools which is given in proportion
to the county valuation. The plan
was opposed, however, by some rural
supervisors, and was defeated.
It was estimated that the $77,635,-
519 valuation would have resulted in
increased state school aid amounting
to something between $4,000 and $40,-
000.
The accepted figure represents an
increase of $990,155 over last year's
total which was $69,857,756. The new
valuation represents also $60,332,970
for real estate and $10,514,941 for
personal property. These figures rep-
resent respective increases of $528,-j
615 and $461,540 over last year's.

o'clock, in Hill Auditorium. The gen-
eral public is cordially invited to at-
tend without admission charge.
School of Education, Changes of
Elections: No course may be elected
for credit after Saturday, July 10; no
course may be dropped without pen-
alty after Saturday, July 24. Any
change of elections of students en-
rolled in this school must be reported
at the Regsitrar's Office, Room 4,
University Hall.
Membership in class does not cease
nor begin until all changes have been
'thus officially registered. Arrange-
ments made with instructors are not
official changes.
Summer Session Chorus: Next re-
hearsal will be Tuesday evening, 7 to
8 o'clock, in Morris Hall. Anyone
interested in singing is welcome.
Prof. David Mattern.
Political Science 151 will meet in
2014 A.H. the remainder of the Sum-
mer Session.
Political Science 185 will meet in
2014 A.H. the remainder of the Sum-
mer Session.
H. J. Heneman.
German Table: Students of Ger-
man and others interested in prac-
tice of oral German are invited to
take part in a German table organ-
ized by the Department of German,
meeting in the Lantern Shpp, 703 E.
University Ave. (opposite University
High School). Meals at various price
levels are served between 12 and 2
p.m., and 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. Further
information may be obtained at the
office of the German Department,
204 U.H.
Phi Delta Kappa professional edu-
cation fraternity will hold its first
luncheon meeting of the current sum-
mer session on Tuesday, July 6 at
12:15 p.m. in the Michigan Union.
Members and their guests are invited
and urged to attend.

livered until those entitled to them are enrolled in the Summer Session
call at The Daily offices. If you are not are requested to call at tse office as
receiving your Michigan Daily, please soon as possible to leave schedules
present your University Treasurer's and addresses. This applies to stu-
receipt for the Summer Session at dents who were in residence during
Daily offices on Maynard St., to- 1936-37 as well as those who have
gether with your full name and ad- been here durig previous years.
dress.
The area in which The Michigan Meader Negates
Daily is delivered by carrier service
comprises all streets between Main War Propheeies
St., east to the city limits. In case
Syou are living outside of this zone, (Continued from Page 11
either west of Main St., or outside __________
of Ann Arbor, please call at the Daily ble than an Eastern war.
offices and give an address within the Dangerous for future peace, said
above zone at which your copy can Professor Meader, are the loud pro-
be delivered. In case this absolutely testations on the part of both sides
cannot be arranged, a mailing charge tending to build up excitement be-
must be paid at the Daily offices be-1 tween the two countries. Bluffs on
fore your Daily will be delivered, lboth sides make peaceful settlement
The Michigan Daily, .Circula- i itrpnVP1mv rfi',t

a
.j
l
>
.
,)

1#'s a rate
the devil m.
4 EDWARD
0ETTE DA

tch
ade!
HUMPHREY BOGART

"A THRILL
FOR THELMA"

NEWS OF
THE DAY

WAYNE MORRIS - JANE BRYAN * Harry Carey:- William Haade
Songs by M. K. Jerome and Jack Scholl . Directed by MICHAEL CUJRTIZ * A Warner Bros. Hit
EXTRA

tion DeptJ, . C. Hall.
University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information:
Registration of all Summer Session
students will be held at 4:10 p.m. on
Wednesday, July 7, in Room 208 Ma-
son Hall, across the hall from the of-
fice of the Bureau. It is requested
that all students wishing to register
this summer attend this meeting with
Dr. Purdom. This is for new regis-
trants only.
Students who have been previously
registered with the Bureau and who
I-'

i Vl lUli l.llV lj UCL11 c1.7 121ViC C.t2111G U1 . I'

w

Now you can sit

OUT

-OF-DOORS

on summer evenings -

TODAY - SATURDAY
"HER
H USBAND'S
SECRETARY"
Jean Muir

SPORTS ENTRY BLANK
Intramural Sports Department
All men students are eligible for competition in the following
sports. Check on the list below the sports in which you wish to
participate.
No Entry Fee Is Required
The Intramural Sports Department will make drawings and sched-
ules, furnish equipment needed for team sports, and provide officials
for the contests where necessary. Notification of opponent and time
of play will be mailed to each participant.

Beverly
Warren

Roberts
F. itII1

u

Also
Color Brevity

I

Circulation Notice: Due to the fact
that several students made out their
registration cards improperly, sev-
eral subscriptions cannot be de-

Nights
35c
Matinees
25c

Cartoon
Pictorial
Novelty
News

the

ELECTRACIDE

I

Softball
Swimming
Golf
Tennis Singles
Tennis Doubles
Handball Singles
Handball Doubles
{

( ) Archery
( ) Horseshoe Singles
( ) Horseshoe Doubles

)
)

(
(
(
(

)
)
)
)

(
Squash
Table Tennis
Badminton
Codeball
Sigma Delta Psi

)

(
(
(
(
(
(
(
(

)
)
)
)
)
)
)
)

_ _
i i

I

Please indicate partner's name in space below doubles entries.
Name .................... Address.................... Phone.....
Mail or bring this blank to R. W. Webster, director of program
and Supervisor of Intramural Sports, Intramural Sports Bldg., Ferry
Field. All entries close at 5 p.m., Thursday, July 8.

I.

Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
FINAL PERFORMANCE
TONIGHT at 8:30

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SUNDAY DINNER
Choice of One:
Cream of Chicken a la Reine
Jellied Consomme or Essence of Clam en Cup
Iced Pineapple Juice
Branch Celery Mixed Olives Sweet Pickles
Fresh Jumbo Shrimp a la Newburg, en Pattie Shell $1.10
Breast of Chicken, Mushrooms, Virginia, Under Bell $1.10
Grilled English Lamb Chops, Pineapple Glace $1.10
Roast Prime Ribs of Choice Beef, au Jus $1.10
Cold Baked Imported Ham, Hearts of Lettuce Salad $1.10
UNION SPECIAL STEAK DINNER $1.35
Tenderloin or Porterhouse with French Fried Potatoes to order.
New Potatoes Rissole or Escalloped Potatoes
New Green Beans au Beurre or Fresh Spinach in Butter
-, F "w":::::::::::::II

keeps your garden, porch, or
veranda free from annoying
If you are unable to sit on the porch at night or step into
the yard without being driven frantic by mosquitoes, you
will find the Electracide a boon. Electracide is a light trap
that attracts and destroys mosquitoes, moths gnats, beetles,
fish flies and other insect pests. You simply plug it into any
convenience outlet, like a portable lamp. It costs only 1/4c
an hour for electricity. Electracide also destroys many
insects which are damaging to shrubs, flowers and fruit
trees . . . the codling moth, bud moth and fruit tree leaf
roller. Experiments in apple orchards have shown that, with
this protection, trees produce greater yields of clean fruit
each year. See the Electracide on display at department

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