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July 12, 1934 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1934-07-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JULY 12, 1934

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Oflcial Publication of the Summer Session

It is time for a new set-up in the system of pa-
roles and pardons, not only in the government of
Michigan, but in many other states, and in local
qgovernment units as well.

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Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.-- -
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
$z5ociated Gelottiahte $9
4= 7933 NATIONAL - ~tvA 1934=
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republition ofall news dispatches credited to it
or not otherwise credited in this paper and the local
news publishedsherein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches are reserved."
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
subscription during summer by carrier, $1.25; by mail,
$:0, During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mal, $4.25.-
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Aran Arbor, 'iciga. Phone:2-214.
presentative: College Publications Representatives,
In., 4 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylston Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
s EDITORIAL STAFF
-Phone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ................E. JEROME PETTIT
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR .....BRACKLEY SHAW
WOMEN'S EDITOR.............ELEANOR JOHNSON
ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Charles A. Baird, Clinton B. Con-
ger, Paul J. Elliott, Thomas E.. Groehn, Thomas H.
Kleene, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch.
RE1EPORTERS: Barbara Bates, C. H.-Bukema, Donald R.
Bird, Ralph Danhoil, Frances English, Elsie Pierce, Vir-
ginia Scott, Bernard H. Fried.
BUSINESS STAFF
Office Hours: 9-12, 1-5 Phone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER ".-. BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
AST BU INESS MANAGER....W. GRAFTON SHARP
QCCULATION MANAGER ........CLINTON B. CONGER
Twelve Years - A New
Life Expectancy. .
UNDER FIRE of a stinging accu-
sation by Judge Herman Dehnke
of Harrisville that a life sentence now amounts
to from 12 to 15 years in prison in this state, W. A.
Debo, parole commissioner, has made public the
records of the Department of Pardons and Paroles.
These records show that thirty criminals given life
sentences have been released since the new ad-
ministration took office in Lansing January 1,
1933, and that these thirty men had served on an
average a little more than ten years each on their
life terms.
One man, who was sentenced to life on charge
of robbery armed, was released in February of this
year after serving only four years and one month.
This was Thomas Chelenko of Saginaw, and in July
he was returned to Marquette prison with a new
life sentence, again for robbery armed. One other
paroled lifer was also returned, after less than
a year at liberty.
Such figures more than bear out Circuit Judge
Dehnke's charges that the life sentence is value-
les in Michigan as a supreme punishment. He
made this assertion when he sentenced John A.
Woods, Tawas farmer who killed four people in a
fit of rage, to a life term and an additional 40 to 50
years, explaining that all too frequently a life sen-
tence works out to a term of from 12 to 15 years.
Debo took exception to this and considered it a
reflection on the Department of Pardons, and on
his administration of that department. It is, how-
ever, not only Debo but the entire parole and par-
don systen of the state which is at fault in per-
mitting such a condition to exist. Records show
that Debo's term is not the first in which it has
.been found desirable to pass such sentences.
In 1929 and 1930 Grand Rapids was victimized
by a wave of armed robberies, and finally three
young men were caught to whom most of the
blame of 'the crimes could be brought home. Judge
Leonard A. Verdier, in passing sentence passed up
regular life sentences in favor.of long terms of 60,
7, ard 80 years, in an effort to stay the state's ten-
fiency to let the public support its criminals di-
rectly rather than indirectly by turning them
loose after only short portions of their sentences
have been served.
In August, 1931, Judge George W. Sample sen-
tenced the Ypsilanti torch murderers to a total of
four life terms each, not to be served concurrently.
As far back as the time of the Loeb-Leopold
case, the cry against lax pardon laws was heard.
While a nation burned with anger because the
judge refused to give the kidnaping slayers cap-
ital punishment, it was computed that under the

laws of Illinois, a life sentence would be reduced to
a minimum of years quite similar to Judge
pehnke's estimates.'
When a condition exisuskwherein judges must
'resort to trick sentences to keep a dangerous man
6n prison for the rest of life, instead of sentencing
him to the actual term of life imprisonment they
wish him to undergo. it is evident that something
,must be altered in either the organization or the
administration of the system of pardons and pa-
roles.
That the administration is at fault is the
)claim of many, and the higher number of paroles
and pardons would seem to indicate that the ac-
cusers are correct. The entire blame, however, can-
pot be centered upon them when the system per-
mits such an executive reversal of a judge's decree.
It is tantamount to placing the entire power of the
judicial system in the hands of the administrative
body of the government, the very evil against
which separation of powers ins aimed. True, the sys-

Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be con-
strued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors
are asked to be brief, confining themselves to less,
than 500 words if possible.
MORE ON SUMMER OBSERVER
To the Editor:
The editors of the Michigan Daily would do well
to consider what A Pedagogue had to say in Cam-
pus Opinion a few days ago. For that Summer Ob-
server who too often mars the general appearance
of the editorial page is indeed awful. "It" evidently
is trying to be entertaining with essays which are
always written on stupid subjects and always writ-
ten very badly.
The average reader of The Daily is, I believe,
a person of average intelligence - if not I doubt
if he could stay long at this institution. And he as
an average reader is not always capable of deciding
on what and to what the Summer Observer is
writing. It certainly isn't humor to point out pe-
culiarities of dress, nor does it take any particularly
observant eye to notice such oddities.
If picking to pieces and ridiculing people is the
Observer's objective, he or she would do well to
confine' his or her efforts to observing around this
campus during the regular session. Indeed the
wealth of material that a bunch of youngsters
present every day during the winter months for a
person of the Obesrver's stamp would furnish
him or her with enough material for Casual Es-
says to last through even the dead summer
session.
If they (the Essays) are written to be enter-
taining they certainly have a long way to go before
they will ever become that. First they must be
intelligently written about an intelligent subject -
not about the appearance a woman makes as she
carries her tray to a table in the League Grill
room.
Really, editors, if you continue to print such
stuff, and that is all it is is stuff, many of your
readers are going to think that the Summer-Daily-
on-the-doorstep-free-of-charge-every-morning is
not a God-bestowed gift but rather the work of
puppy-like nincompoops.
-The Observer's Observer.
Casual Essays
By THE SUMMER OBSERVER

Tit is not until the smashing climax in which
Cagney hurls his rival off a steamship after a
battle royal that Bette's eyes are opened to the per-
fidity of her luxury-loving boss. Alice White as a
dumb cutie, together with Allen Jenkins, her lover
and right hand man to Cagney, have been placed
in supporting roles.
Others li the cast are Arthur Hohl, Phillip Reed,
Hobart Cavanaugh, Mayo Methot, Ralfe Harolde,
Philip Faversham and Nora Lane. It's a Warner
Brother's picture.
AT THE MICHIGAN
"PRIVATE SCANDAL"
Starting at the Michigan today is "Private Scan-
dal," with an all-star cast which includes Phillips
Holmes, Mary Brian, Zasu Pitts, Ned Sparks and
Lew Cody.
The, story, based upon the original by Bruce
Manning and Vera Caspary, tells of a real estate
broker (Lew Cody), threatened with ruin unless
he can raise funds to cover stock market losses.
Unable to borrow, he decides to kill himself so
that his insurance may cover the missing funds.
But, since his policies bar suicide, he must make
it look like murder. He reveals his plan to Phillips
Holmes, his daughter's fiance, and begs him to
remove the gun after his death.
When Holmes is unable to stop Cody from his
contemplated act, he comes to the office, finds
the body, and removes the gun.
The discovery of the body sends the office into
a turmoil. Each must lie to protect himself - and
the lies drive the sad-faced detective (Ned Sparks)
to distraction.
It's a Paramount Picture, directed by Ralph
Murphy.
The Theaetre

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLE'
Publicaton in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of
Unitcraity. Copy received at the Summer Seson office until 3:30;
Sat Urd a y.

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The date of the Excursion to Put-
in-Bay, Lake Erie. has been changed
from Saturday, July 21, to Wednes-
day, July 18.
Men's Education Club Golf Match:
Th? next golf match between the
teams of the Club will be held Friday,
July 13. 1:30 p.m., because of the
Club's picnic today, which was the
original date ,:et for golf.
Men's Education Club baseball'
game today, 4:00 p.m., Ferry Field.
U. S. Civil Service Commission an-
nounces the following examination:
Junior Legal Assistant (Labor Law),
Bureau of Labor Statistics, $2,000.
Announcement is on file at the of-
fiee, 201 Mason Hall.
Students in the College of Engi-
neering: Saturday, July 14, will be
the final day for dropping a course in
the Summer Session without record.
Courses may be dropped only with the
permission of the classifier after econ-
ference with the instructor in the
course.
Michigan Repertory Players: "Both
Your Houses," Maxwell Anderson's
Pulitzer prize satire on Congress is
being presented this week at the Lydia
Mendelssohn theatre.
Season Ticket Patrons - Michigan
Repertory Players: Please make your
reservations for "Both Your Houses"
as early as possible. The advance
sale for this show is very heavy and
your co-operation will assist the Play-
ers in supplying good seats.
Social Directors, Sorority Chaper-
ons, League Househeads, Undergradu-
ate Women: Any undergraduate
woman expecting to be out of her
residence over-night during the week
(Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, or
Thursday - unless she has no classes
on Friday) must register her planin
the office of the Dean of Women be-
fore :00 p.m., of that day.
Byri Fox Bacher,
Acting Dean of Women
Dance Club will meet for the first
time next Friday at 2 o'clock for work
rime for later meetings will be dis-
cussed.
Summer School Glee Club: Rehear-
sal tonight at 7 o'clock in Morris Hall
Women Students: There will be a
picnic swim Friday evening. Party
will leave Barbour Gymnasium at 5
o'clock. A charge of 35 cents will be
made to cover food and transporta-
tion. Make reservation by Friday
noon in Room 15, Barbour Gymna-
sium.

lMany

Committee on Orientatio
Room 107, Mason Hall.
Conference on Worshii
Michigan League Saturday
o'clock to 12:15 and 2:00
conference will be held u
ship and the Conservation
Professor Norman B. Richa
Frederick B. Fisher, Prof.
Courtis and Rev. Henry T.
others will speak. Open t
School students without fe
Stalker Hall: Friday at9
ternational Party and Da
cored by the Internationa
For;lm. Admission 35 cen
:on or 50 cents per couple
come.
This group of hostesses
Friday, July 13. Please repw
ly at 8:45 on the second f
Michigan League. A diffe
will work next week.
Jean Seeley
Maxine Maynard
Margaret Kimball
Jane Fletcher
Charlotte Whitman
Betty Aigler
Mary Morrison
Phyllis Brum
Kay Russell
Dot Moore
Frances Thornton
Margaret Siewers
Wilma Clisbe
Mary Ellen Hall
Barbara Nelson
Elva Pascoe
Margaret Burke
Sue Calcutt
Marie Heid
Margaret Robb
Lucille Benz
Charlotte Johnson
Jean Keppel
Greta Wessborg
Marian Wiggin
Marian Hymes
Men who are acting as
the Friday night dance p
promptly at 8:45 on thes
of the Michigan League.
Richard Edmundson
Bob Calver
Chuck Baird
John Streit
Peko Bursley
Joe Roper
Bill Langden
George Burke
Paul Kissinger
Bob Hewitt
Bob Fox
Bob Babcock
Chuck Niessen
John Pyster
John French

ANN ARBOR BEER JOINTS-
Beer imbibers and thrill seekers of a mild caliber
have become acquainted with Ann Arbor's beer
parlors. West of Division St. they're located
thicker than gas stations and drug stores - wide-
open cafes where a customer may partake of beer
and ale to his heart's content.
There's one place, not far across the border,
where on the ceiling is seen a small iron bell, string
attached. When a new keg is tapped, ring goes the
bell, out flows the beer, in comes the dimes. The
ringing is a merry sign of business, then: but a
warning near twelve when patrons know that
"after the sound of the gong" there is just five
minutes more in which to order beer.
Thirsty patrons sometimes order five apiece,
,then sit complacently looking into the amber
,liquid as the bell tolls restriction.
A strong head waiter looks over the thirsty as
they enter. In comes a man whose youth must
have been in the gay nineties. He wanders among
,the crowd, head very erect. He sits at a table
for two, twirls his large, black cigar, smooths his
long moustache, and waits. If his hair were blacker,
he might be taken for "the Man on the Flying
Trapeze.' 'Maybe he is, grown grey with flying! He
pats back his thin hair, and orders beer. Solemnly
he looks at three women.
They too sit very erect. No man graces their
table. On their bosoms blazons the golden star of
P.E.O.
The women stare-blankly as a "youth" passes
with his lady-love. The man merits their stare,
for his sly, lean blonde face is encased in a pointed
beard. The thing seems to pull his face down, else
why does his head fall forward, and his neck seem
of insufficient support?
He lifts a glass of beer to his beard. "Here's
to hair on your chest!" says a man at an adjoin-
ing table to his party. The bearded one puts down
his beer unquaffecd.
Waiter, waiter. A high chair! For there has en-
tered a baby, young enough to want such a seat.
Four people sit round and imbibe. The young one
sits, and giggles. "Papa drinking his soup," and the
,aby gurgles some more.
r-1
Screen Reflections
AT THE MAJESTIC
"JIMMY THE GENT"
Mr. James (treat-'em-rough-and-make-'em-
like-it) Cagney comes to town today, folks, in his
latest show - a little number entitled "Jimmy the
Gent." It's showing at the Majestic Theatre.
Being one of Jimmy's own personal fans (we've
been that way since the time he first started
reating women the way he does) we're looking
forward to seeing his most recent effort. And then,
the idea of his combining with Bette Davis in-
trigues us. Bette the nice little girl - Mr. Arliss'
favorite protege. Can she "take it?" We'll see.
The picture, we are told, concerns a couple of
heir chasers (Cagney and Alan Dinehart) who
are rivals in both business and love. Their efforts

"BOTH YOUR HOUSES"
In Review
By BRACKLEY SHAW
It is a real pleasure to be able to give this Mich-
igan Repertory Players' show unqualified approval.
The opening performance of Maxwell Anderson's
"Both Your Houses" last night ranks well with
anything Play Production has done in a long
time.
Taking "Elizabeth the Queen"' and "Once in a
Lifetime," probably the two best efforts of the
campus dramatic classes during the past year, as
a standard of excellence it is fair to say that this
play can challenge either of them.
The play itself is a remarkable satire on the
log-rolling, pork-barrel politics which go to make
for a government "omnibus" appropriation bill.
;fore savage than "Of Thee I Sing," it is a fitting
successor as winner of the Pulitzer Prize for drama
The story is that of a young Nevada school-teacher
who, on being elected to the United States House
pf Representatives, was assigned to' the appropria-
ions committee and finds himself in the midst of
a bunch of graft-hungry politicians whose motto
is "government is a business of graft and corrup-
tion with a by-product of order." Being a young
man with high ideals he refuses to pass the pie
and accept his slice and instead sets out to defeat
an important bill by crowding it with huge and
useless appropriations. He is defeated, of course,
by the old-line politicians who know the ropes
but not until he has fully aroused their realistic -
almost naturalistic - ideas of how the government
should be run.
It would be useless to attempt to single out
members of the cast for criticism. They were all
good. Special mention should go, nevertheless,
to Claribell Baird who as Bus, the distinguished
secretary infected with a new enthusiasm the
young congressman. Frederic Crandall as Solomon
Fitzmaurice, the cynical and oratorical congress-
man who used to have a conscience and a guar-
dian angel but had long since fought them both
off, was also particularly satisfactory.
The remainder of the cast was adequate and
more. The direction was excellent. Having many
many short, humorous lines, the play might have
been stupid at a slower pace but, due to Mr.
Windt's direction, it moved throughout at top
speed.
It's a good show.
Washington
Off The Record
*06 -,eA
THERE IS ONE DRAWBACK to attending diplo-
matic dinners for some of the women guests.
It is traditional that women do not smoke at such
affairs.
THE CAPITOL'S "dandies" have been put to
shame by George Boncesco, Rumanian coun-
selor.
Boncesco went into complicated negotiations and
emerged with a handsome summer suit of silk.
First he sent to Japan for silk samples. He
mailed Ilis choice back, and finally the silk, itself,
arrived.
Then Boncesco -mailed the material to the West
Indies, where he found a specially talented tailor
on a recent trip.
Eventually the suit arrived, and Boncesco
stepped out.
BUDGET DIRECTOR LEWIS DOUGLAS of Ari-
zona has a famous story which raises the hair
of his listeners.
It starts, "When the sun sets, the desert around
Phoenix turns to gold. The moon rises like a golden
saucer and the stars sparkle like diamonds in the
sky."
The little idyll goes on until the audience is
lulled into a dreamy and wistful hush.
"As the moon rises," continues Douglas, "the
birds cease chirping. Then is heard the Piute maid-

11:30tab
on Week, At Fi
"Both Your He
: At the summer plays to
y from 10 Repertory Player
o'clock, a Mendelssohn The
ipon Wor- well-filled house.
of Values. In the "first n
rdeon, Dr. many well-know
Stuart A. nected with the
Lewis and Session. Dean A
o Summer women during th
e charge. Prof. and Mrs.I
Joseph Bursley,
9 p.m.: In- E. N. Durfee w
ince spon- opening.
al Student Others seen w
tis pcr per-
>sAll wel- H. A. Kenyon, P
Willow, Prof. an
ders, Mr. and n
will work Prof. and Mrs..
rt prompt- Miss Elliot Bell
loor of the Francis Compto
rent group the players.
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COLGA'
officials atD
lease report
second foor
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Full S
nal Siamese
the back-
North Car-
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s from town
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$1.00
50c A
25c C
25c F
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IL
LY
LAST YE
e 6300 COULD NO9
MAND for tl
tation of Du
year the pa(
beautiful ar
END with all bat
ATINEES see it to apr
White sets of
liant tones
"Flower Bas
cool in appea
able in Flesh
rks ques Fleurs,;
ques Fleurs,]
Bois Dorman
a limited tim
ror 33c
CAI
N.

fri
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5c
nex
23 x 44
Toi
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Seven Ou
c Peechee
teS
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19
$2.00
ibro
Sets
ncluding
AMBRO
AMBROS
DOUETTI
FUNNEL
79c

ampus
Ies Seen
rest Night
iuses," fourth of the
be presented by the
rs, opened in Lydia
eatre last night to a
ight" audience were
n personages con-
University Summer
lice Lloyd, dean of
e regular school year,
W. H. Hobbs, Dean
and Prof. and Mrs.
ere present at the
tere Prof. and Mrs.
rot. and Mrs. H. H.
d Mrs. Henry A. San-
Mrs. Louis M. Eich,
John Barker Waite,
and Mr. and Mrs.
in, guest director of
Eddie Bob
2*HTON & WOODRUFF
and TheirMusic
ing mry night exce; t Non.
misioln 40c at MI1hgan's
Beautiful Summ m~ilroom

1
1

A Committee has been appointed-
to make a thorough study of Orienta- P. T. Barnum's origir
tion Week and report the result of this twins married sisters in
study. Members of the faculty are woods of Wilkes, county,
invited to send criticisms and sug- olina, and many of their
gestions on this general subject to, live in that section now.

1, I

to

All Types of
Taught daily. Private
lessons only. Terrace
Garden Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695

SWIM at
N EWPORT 51
TRUNKS PERMISS.
Portage Lake 14 mile

MAPS
19c,
19C
wels
nce
hoe
er
"
sIa
SIA
IA
Es
)UBIGANT
THE DE-
ial presen-
wder. This
even more
harmonize
You must
t. Antique
ly the bril-
Houbigant
efreshingly
.gain avail-
im in Quel-
te in Quel-
n Ideal and
5 Value for
0.
NS'

,

Maxwell Anderson's Pulitzer Prize Play
TONIGHT - FRIDAY - SATURDA
at 8:30
Lydia ME NDELSSOHN Theatre

Single Admissions 75c, 50c and 35c
RESERVATIONS NOW!

Phon

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ATTEND MICHIGANAT
COOL MATINEES....M G * * * 'COOL M'
THE SUICIDE MURDER MYSTERY-
Nobody would talk but the victim - and he couldn'
rIVATE SCANDAL
Phillips Holmes - Mary Brian - Zasu Pitts -,Ned Spa
Selected Short Subjects

EAR HC
T MEET
heir spec
sting Po)
xkage is
nid will
hrooms.
preciate i
f striking
of the
sket." R
arance. A
and Crea
and Whi
Le Parfun
nt. A $1.6
Le at $1.04
LKl
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. . . . . . . . . . . . MAJESTIC . . . . ....
SENSATIONAL NEW LOW PRICES
Matinees: All Seats 25c -- Evenings: Balcony 25c, Main Fl
He Socks 'Em With Culture!
"JIMMY THE. GEN T

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