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July 19, 1935 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-07-19

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THE MICHIGAN DALILY ~-

$500,000 For
Securing Army
Business Shown
House Military Committee
Is Given Information By
Chairman McSwain
WASHINGTON, July 18. - M) -
An assertion that Joseph Silverman,
Jr., dealer in army surpluses, had
spent $500,000 over 15 years to pro-
mote his business with the war de-
partment was handed the House Mil-
itary Committee today by Chairman
McSwain.
The hearing renewed the commit-
tee's investigation, ordered by the
House a year ago,,into War depart-
ment business and procurement prac-
tices.
"We had a power lobby that creat-
ed a furore in Washington by spend-
ing $300,000," McSwain asserted.
"And here we have you, a single
firm, spending nearly $500,000 around
Washington."
Silverman said he had residences
in Washington and Bradley Beach,
N. J.
The chairman said money had been
spent for gambling, flowers and whis-
key for army officers and the like.
"Do I have to get your permission
to do that?" Silverman asked.
McSwain drew from Silverman tes-
timony that companies in which he
is interested with his brothers had
attempted to sell army uniforms,
tents, overcoats andasignal flags to
the Ethiopian government.
Catholic Church
Feud Renewed
By Nazi Party
American Editor Seized
On Charge Of Opposing
Hitler Regime
BERLIN, July 18. - (A') - Gen.
Herrmann Wilhelm Goering, Ger-
many's Secret Police chief, came
back today from conferring with
Reichsfuehrer Adolf Hitler in the Ba-
varian mountains to fire another
broadsde in Nazism's newest drive
againstthe Catholic Church.
He issued an order to criminal
prosecution authorities to enforce
strictly decrees against "political
Catholicism," asserting this sort of
Catholicis'm "must be overcome by
positive National Socialism."
A few hours later Secret Police
seized M. C. Harbeck, American editor
of the German edition of the maga-
zine, Golden Age, published in Berne,
Switzerland, by the International
Bible Students Society, alleging
among other things that the Berne
edition of the journal continuously
attacked the Nazi regime.
Harbeck, who was allowed to com-
municate -with the American Con-
sulate General, also was accused of
attempting to remove money from
attached properties of the Interna-
tional Bible Students Society's sealed
printingplant at Magdeburg, and of
maintaining connections with the
Watch Tower Bible and Tract So-
ciety, banned by the Nazis.
Anti-Jewish demonstrations, ac-
companied by intermittent violence,
of Monday and Tuesday were over-
shadowed by the increasing bitterness
of the now open conflict between
church and state.
Anti-Semitic propaganda contin-
ued, however, in the shape of ad-
vertisements of the rabid anti-Jewish
jour'nal Stuermer, while the newspa-
per Judenkenner, its rival in bitter

diatribes against Hebrews, openly
urged the death penalty for Jews.
guilty of intimacy with Aryan women.
BOX SCORE

Ethiopians Prepare For Emperor's Call To Arms

-Associated Press Photo.
While Ethiopian warriors awaited orders of Emperor Haile Selassie at Addis Ababa for general mobili-
zation of the African kingdom's fighting forces in preparation for the threatened war with Italy, extensive
drilling was undtartaken eagerly by all classes of people. The accompanying pictures show some of the
preparations, top, left to right: Machine gun trench maneuvers, infantry rifle practice, porters carrying..
ammunition. Below, an Ethiopian pilot (left), and barefoot infantrymen on the march.

Bitterly Opposed To Change In Customs

Zebulon Pike
Himself Would
Love This Golf
Peak Named For Him Will
Watch Golfers Playing
In Western Amateur
COLORADO SPRINGS, July 18. -
UP) - Some of the nation's best golf-
ers who play for fun will level their
sights July 16-21 on the red mountain
that Zebulon Montgomery Pike tried
to climb in 1806 and couldn't.
Pike's Peak towers high above the
diverting Broadmoor course, scene of
the 36th annual Western amateur
championship, and on the first hole a
straight tee shot makes a beeline for
Colorado's most famous mountain.
But it is not likely many of the
contestants will have much time or
attention, until the last putt drops, to
give to the surrounding scenery, in-
viting though it is.
The Broadmoor layout unfolds a
knotty problem for the best of sharp-
shooters. It is somewhat shorter than
most championship courses, measur-
ing 6,445 yards from the back tees,
but peril lurks in its rolling, wavy
terrain for the golf ball inclined to
stray. Par is 70 - 35 each way.
While the fairways are generous
enough on most holes, they have de-
ceptive slopes which are apt to make
a ball "kick" into rough of sufficient-
ly perverse nature to test the most
serene competitor.
Traps and trees dot the course
where they are most likely to get in
the way of the campaigner who loses
control of a shot. Once on the green,
the player still has some close figuring
to do, as nearly all of the carpets
have a puzzling roll and many are
terraced.
Wilfred Reid, professional at
Broadmoor and an oldtimer with
much experience both in this country
and England, calls the greens the
toughest tests for putting he has ever
encountered.
Lawson Little, British and Ameri-
can amateur champion who won the
Broadmoor invitation event here two
years ago and was runner-up to Gus
Moreland in the 1933 Trans-Missis-
sippi, also played here, told friends
that if he could putt well on this
mountain-fringed course he could
putt well anywhere.
Little intended to enter the Western
but a tour he is taking with his fath-
er will keep him from bidding for
the title Zell Eaton won at Oklahoma
City last year. Eaton has moved
from Oklahoma City to Los Angeles
but will defend his laurels.
Glenna Collett Vare
Wins Uphill Battle
EASTERN POINT, Conn., July 18.
- (P) - Staging an uphill battle over
the last nine holes, Mrs. Glenna Col-
lett Vare, of Philadelphia, today de-
feated Miss Helen Waterhouse, of
Providence, R. I., by a margin of
1 up to enter the final round of the
Griswold Cup golf tournament.
In the other semi-final match, MiAs
Jean Bauer, of Providence, the de-
fending champion, defeated Miss Vir-
ginia Bascom of Worcester, Mass., 4
and 3.

Temporary Mayor

Jailed in Berlin Riot

-Associated Press Photo.
E. W. Wczd (above) of New
York, midshipman on the U. S.
battleship Wyoming, was arrested
when he figured in a fist fight dur-
ing the anti-Jewish riots in Berlin
and was fined 50 marksi-about
$20 - after spending a night in jail.

-Associated Press Photo.
D. Spence Lewis (above), city
finance commissioner of Sioux City,
Ia., became acting mayor after a
temporary court order suspended
Mayor W. D. Hayes on the recom-
mendation of the Woodbury county
grand jury.
150 ATTEND TEA
Approximately 150 members of the
faculty and students attended the
Summer Session tea which was held
from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday
in the garden of the Michigan League.
This tea marks the second in a
series of regular teas sponsored by
the Summer Session every Wednes-
day.
AUTOMOBILE COMPASS
Have you ever taken
the wrong road and
.traveled many miles
',before discovering
your mistake? This
Snew Airplane Type
Compass constantly
tells the direction of
-. travel. Base 13's" dia.
ONLY $1.95 postpaid.
HALLER'S JEWELRY STORE
State at Liberty

--Associated Press Photo.
Ethiopia holds to its centuries-old customs, as indicated by the scene at left showing an open-air "barber
shop" in Addis Ababa. But its citizens, proud to the point of haughtiness, scorn Italy's talk of "culture." Fierce
courage is theirs, and soldiers like the one at right prom ise deadly opposition to invasion.
* *
Ethiopians Cling To Old Traditions,
Scorning I Duce 's Talk O Culture'

Detr
White cf .........
Coehrane c ......
Gehringer 2b .....
Greenberg lb .....
Goslin lf .........
Rogell ss .........
Fox rf ..........
Owen 3b .........
Rowe p .........

iroft
AB
.4
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..4
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0
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Totals......36
Boston
AB
Melillo 2b........4
Cooke cf ..........4
Johnson If ........4
Cronin ss... ..4
Miller, rf .........3
R. Ferrell c ........3
Werber 3b.......3
Dahlgren lb ......3
W. Ferrel p.......2

8 8 27 9

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LONDON, July 18. - (R') - Mus-
solini's heralded "cultural" campaign
against Ethiopia wakes only scorn in
that ancient black empire.
Archaic customs and an atmos-
phere of medieval times may exist
there, but intelligence, fierce courage
and pride amounting to haughtiness
mark the distinction between the sub-
jects of Emperor Haile Selassie and
the rest of Africa's teeming millions.
If "culture" means the frenzy for
modern conveniences, then Abyssinia
is far off the mark. Hardworking
and frugal, the Ethiopian is happy
as long as he is left alone. An ankle-
length shirt is his wardrobe, and in
his thatched hut he dines on bread
dipped in a great family bowl of
"dripping" left over from the last
feast day when a sheep was killed. He
washes it down with home-brewed
beer.
Salt For Money
Coins minted in 1780 are circulated
in Addis Ababa, but barter is the pre-
valent means of exchange. In some
provinces, salt is the only "currency."
The family exchequer is a foot-long
bar of salt, and from it enough is
chipped off daily to supply the house-
hold needs.
Feudal barons still rule the marches
from their fortified castles, going
forth from time to time to mete out
rough justice. The law is simple.
When an offense is committed, it is
left to the injured party to.seize the
culprit and bring him to justice.
Every town has its Tyburn, wlhere
malefactors swing in chains. Debtors
go about chained to their creditors,
clanking from door to door begging
help from their friends, to avoid pris-
on.
Thieves are conspicuous by a mis-
sing hand.
Western methods -=notably in the
field of military training and war
equipment - are slowly taking hold,
but centuries-old traditions and cus-
toms have a powerful grip.
The Emperor Entertains
When the emperor gives a state
+,_ _ - ei'lnh n in ha

Reduced

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monotony of the surrounding land-
scape broken only by gaunt eucalyp-
tus trees. It was built 50 years ago
by the emperor Menelik, who chose
the site for its 8,000-foot altitude.
If Italy invades Ethiopia, her sol-
diers will face not only the ravages of

water-famine and fever on the plains,
the night and day ambushes in the
mountains, but also the unrelenting
and terrifying thrusts by "squalls" of
cavalary - the wild swooping charges
of black centaurs who know death but
not defeat.

BRADLEY
BRADLEY

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THAT'S THE
BOY FRIEN1D
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HALTERS
TRUNKS

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'atermelon Cut' Will
Be Given At League
The Southern Club will sponsor



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