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July 19, 1935 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1935-07-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY "FRIDAY, JLY 19,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Official Publication of the Summer Session

a more rational viewpoint than those of the ex-
treme left wing, will criticize administration efforts
as simply state capitalism, a collusion between
government and industry.
Between and about these positions will be sta-
tioned the many minority opinions, as Father
Coughlin and Senator Long, with fusions of sup-
port inevitable, all revolving about the same fun-
damental issue.

T E

i, -- i

"I

11

SCREEN

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
University. Copy received at the office of the Summer Session, Room 1213
A.H. until 3:30; 11:30 a.m. Saturday.

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

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AT THE MICHIGAN
Double Fdature
"CHARLIE CHAN IN EGYPT"

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1' .-

A Washington
BYSTANDER

- m -" " s '
Publia'led every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
aeliber of the Western Conference Editorial Association
ad the Big Ten News Service.
MEMBER
ASsodated 6gliegiat lrss
-s194 ~ e~~rX~iwzi19 35-
A ONlVASCOSIN
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
fo republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the PostdOffice at Ann Arbor. Michigan, as
Bepond elass matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Thrd Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
. during regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
.50.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicao, Ill.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR.................JOHN C. HEALEY
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR ..ROBERT S. RUWITCH
&ATOCIATE EDITORS: Thomas E. Groehn, Thomas H.
eene, William Reed, Guy M. Whpple, Jr.
ASISTANT EDITORS: Robert Cummins, Joseph Mattes,
"lsie Pierce, Charlotte Rueger.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINES MANAGER............ RUSSELL READ
ASSISTANT BUS. MGR......... BERNARD ROSENTHAL
Crculation Mnager............... . Clinton B. Conger
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: Charles E. Brush, Frederick E.
M~age.
More Race
i1gotryv *.*s
T HE GERMAN FASCIST govern-
ment's medievalism is nowhere
more apparent than in the fields of sociology
and ethnology.
This government's witch-on-a-broomstick type
of thought is exposed most clearly by recent dis-
patches from Berlin, which state that "certain
prominent Jew-baiters" are demanding that no
Jew in the Reich be allowed to:
(1) Rent apartments to Aryans.
(2) Engage Aryan domestic help.
(3) Attend Aryans as physicians or accept Ar-
yans as clients.
On first reading it appears that the Aryans,
nrt the Jews, would be most likely to suffer from
such an arrangement, but with typical Nazi illog-
icality Julius Streicher of the government forces
ignores the value of the Jew or member of any
other race in contemporary society.
The sheer stupidity of the "pure Aryan" myth
is still, apparently, not visible to the Nazi "sci-
entists." Dr. Arthur Guett, whose job it is to
sterilize those who are against the government,
pronounces solemnly:
"The mixture of races causes the swelling of
congenitally unsound elements."
One of the "races" which is not supposed to mix
with the Aryan "race" seems to be the Catholic
"race," for the government's sterilization program
is directed vehemently against Catholics, among
others, and thedPope himself has seen fit to ask
Herr Hitler to desist.
Americans, who know full well how this country
has been strengthened by the influx to our shores
of all nationalities, "races," and beliefs, will not
easily forgive the German socio-economic system
for its crimes against humanity.
The country which is willing to serve as a
"melting pot" will prove superior in the end to
that which wishes "purity" of its dominant myth-
ical "race."
Sir Josiah Raises
A Fundamental Issue.. .
S IR JOSIAH STAMP, the eminent
British economist, is a competent
observer and a qualified commentator and for
that reason his observations upon a recent tour of
America are especially important. Partiqularly
of interest are his conclusions. He says:
I left America with the impression that a
country so rich in resources, so active in
thought, so experimental, so irrepressible, so
undaunted by disaster, cannot but rise super-
ior to any wounds inflicted upon itself by a
mistaken or overhasty treatment of its ail-
ments. America is "coming through"-not

perhaps quite as planned, but by sheer force
of its own momentum, and the richness of its
gifts.
Gratifying as these conclusions must be to
Americans at first reading, Sir Josiah has also
touched upon what will inevitably be the funda-
mental issue of the 1936 political campaign. That
issue will supersede all issues of states' rights, pres-
ervation of the constitution and other questions
of the day, for they flow out of it directly -
whether administration regulatory efforts have ac-
tually hastened or retarded recovery and whether
those efforts have been too extensive or not suf-
ficiently extensive.
To the old school Republicans, characterized
by Ogden Mills, the answer will of course be
that governmental interference has retarded na-
tural recovery, and they will cite Sir Josiah as
attesting to the natural recuperative powers of
America without artificial stimulus. That school
will be the representatives of the old conserva-
tism of laissez faire and rugged individualism,
and however it may have been loudly discredited
,,it hl hrc - ts inev~itable lage bp odyof supporters.

By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON - If Senator Borah's declara-
tion for political independence of the su-
preme court represents an actual apprehension
that the G.O.P. might draft its '36 standard bearer
from the court on a save-the-constitution plat-
form, one very practical aspect of such strategy
might serve to reassure him.
A supreme court vacancy thus created would be
filled by President Roosevelt's appointment. Fur-
thermore a Senate overwhelmingly Democratic
and showing also an almost 50-50 conservative-
liberal split on the minority side, would pass upon
the suitability of the appointee, including perhaps
the question of his political philosophy.
From that point of view, the "talk" of finding
a presidential candidate among the court mem-
bership Borah so greatly deplores bids fair to re-
main just talk. It springs, he says, from "the fer-
tile brains of political strategists" who have read
certain recent court opinions as coinciding with
their ideas of party advantage.
S * * * *
MENTIONED NO NAMES
THERE are three recent opinions to which this
might have reference although the senator
mentioned no names. He merely said that the
names of two members of the court had been
mentioned in connection with presidential nom-
ination possibilities. Of the three opinions, two
were by Chief Justice Hughes and the other by
Justice Roberts.
In the rail pension case these two justices were
in head-on collision. Roberts voiced the five-man
controlling view that the act was unconstitutional;
Hughes the four-man dissent. But for his subse-
quent authorship of the unanimous finding against
constitutionality of NRA, Mr. Hughes' name hard-
ly could have been mentioned for political con-
sideration on a save-the-constitution issue idea.
RISKING THE SUBSTANCE
IN ANY EVENT, it is obvious that President
Roosevelt does not yet regard it as impossible
that the present membership of the court will sus-
tain the constitutionality of some legislative ap-
proach to the social reform objectives of the New
Deal. His letter to Representative Hill, urging
passage of the Guffey coal bill in the face of even
"reasonable" doubts of its constitutionality illus-
trates his position. Except for the implications
of the NRA case, none would be likely to say that
the further tests of constitutionality of New Deal
measures would be settled except by narrow mar-
gin divisions among the justices. The five-four
division has been the rule; the unanimous NRA
finding is the exception.'
That being the case, invading the bench for a
save-the-constitution presidential candidate would
look a good deal like risking the substance for the
shadow. It could mean the setting up of a definite
liberal majority on the court against which a save-
the-constitution president, even, would be all but
powerless until vacancies came among the court
liberals. That is likely to prove more of a deter-
rent to party strategists to whom Senator Borah
refers than his own highly academic argument.
BOOKS
By JOHN SELBY
"THE ANCIENT WORLD,"
by T. R. Glover; (Macmillan).
PERHAPS T. R. GLOVER, who is "public orator
to the University of Cambridge," would be in-
censed to know that his delightful "The Ancient
World" suggests this subtitle to the writer: "Gos-
siping Through Old Greece and Rome." Perhaps
he takes his book seriously, in the bad sense of the
term.
Or perhaps he is the sort of man his writing
would indicate, the sort who understands that,
after all, history is mostly gossip, and that the
informal approach to it is always better than the
boiled shirt approach.
Glover's ancient world is ancient Greece and
Rome, really. He sideswipes the other ancient
civilizations, but makes no broad appraisal of
them (unlike Dr. Will Durant, whose colossal "The
Story of Civilization" will be mentioned in this

column tomorrow). But the two men are alike
in their appreciation of ancient times as merely the
dooryard of today.
"The Ancient World" begins with a set of for-
mulae which (the author believes) determine the
course of civilization and history. One will do
for an example -"ranges, rivers and roads." When
he has sufficiently prepared the base, he begins
consideration of Greece with a great deal about
the Homeric epics, some of the most ingratiating
pages ever written on old Greece, incidentally.
The same indirect (yet pertinent) approach
serves through the book. It is a method which
leads an author into digression; Glover is forever
dropping from ancient Greece into Canada or
England. He admits no incongruity in thus min-
gling epochs and epics. Indeed, he points out that
speaking of Greek or Roman or French history is
really only a convenience. The Mediterranean is
one sea and the history of all it touches is one
history.-
"The Ancient World" is, in short, unconven-

ArFox picture with Warner Oland, Pat Pat-
terson, Thomas Beck. Rita Cansino. and Stepin
Fetchit. Also a Paramount newsreel.
Omitting a welcome number of his Chinese
proverbs, but becoming irritatingly profuse in his
subservient "Thank you's," Warner Oland finds
the murderer here no more quickly than probably
most of the audience.
Hollywood's attempts to conceal some from the
suspicion of the audience while on the other hand
broadly and falsely hinting that a young inno-
cent is the murderer, makes it easy to narrow
the field down to two. When one of these is
murdered, it's all over.
Spookery comes in mostly during the sporadic
excursions of archeologists and Chan into the
tombs of the Egyptian queen, which is guarded
by the Goddess of Vengeance. The murderer often
lurks here, and his villainy in these eerie sur-
roundings provides the only real thrills.
Stepin Fetchit is in Egypt to demonstrate the
Negro's reaction to mummies and goddesses of
vengeance, which he does amusingly. The others
in the cast are either pleasant or evil, as occasion
demands.

* * * *

VOL. XVI No. 22s
FRIDAY, JULY 19, 1935t
Professer Charles L. Jamison, Pro-t
fessor of Business Policy, will give a
lecture on "Salaries and Services" to-
day, Friday, at 5 p.m., in the Audi-F
torium of the Natural Science Build-
ing.
University High School Demon-
stiaticn Assembly: The second dem-
onstration assembly of the University
High School Summer Session will bet
presented this morning at ten o'clock
in the University High School audi-
torium. The program will be givenf
by pupils in the English classes. Itt
will consist of three parts: Drama-j
tization of contemporary poems, an
old-style Friday afternoon program,;
and a playlet exemplifying the uses of
grammar. All summer session stu-
dents who are interested are cor-
dially invited to attend the assembly.
Women Students: The department
of Physical Education for women
will hold a picnic swim today, leaving
Barbour Gymnasium at 5:30. Women
students wishing to attend are asked
to register in Room 15 Barbour Gym-
nasium, by this noon. A small fee
will be charged.
Southern Club: A watermelon cut-
ting for members of the Southern
Club will be held in the garden of the
Michigan League at 7:00 o'clock this
evening.
, , rried Students: All married stu-
dents and their families are invited
to a picnic and pot-luck supper to be
held at the Island this afternoon,
Activities to consist of baseball
and* other games will begin at
5:00. Bring your own dishes, sand-
wiches and drink and one dish to
contribute to the supper. This pic-
nic is under the auspices of the Mich-
igan Dames.
.Biologloal Chemistry 120 will meet
in the West Amphitheater, West
Medical Building, July 19, at 7 a.m.
Excursion No. 7, General Motors
Proving Ground: Those who have
signified their intention of going to
the Proving Ground and have not

/'

** "ORCHIDS TO YOU"
A Fox picture, with Jean Muir. Charles Butter-
worth, John Boles, Harvey Stephens, Ruthelma
Stephens, and Arthur Lake.
Pale, pious, but well-liked Jean Muir gives a
good demonstration in "Orchids To You" of how a
modern young business woman "handles situa-
tions" in the "right" way, while managing to snag
a husband herself in the end.
Camelia Rand (Jean Muir), owner of a flower
shop, meets a pleasant young lawyer (John Boles)
when he tries to evict her. She finds out, in her
position of florist, a lot of things about his wife
that he doesn't know. The story is rather dull
in several spots. -R.A.C.

P

r- I PrAmolim-mmmmim" . 11- 1

1

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11

The SOAP BOX

Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked
to be brief, the editor reserving theright to condense
all letters of over 300 words and to accept or reject
letters upon the criteria of general editorial importance
and interest to the campus.
Well, We Could Build A New Camp
To the Soap Box:
After three weeks of badly blistered heels I wish
to complain to the complaint department, or grieve
to the grievance committee. It may be that down
south we walk a little less, but just as a matter of
convenience for all, couldn't the campus buildings
be a little more closely agglutinated, and the side-
walks be made a little less resistant to pressure?
Think of the decreased foot-power one could un-
dergo in four years with existing conditions. It
almost defies calculation.
-Mary Louise Hooper.

secured their bus tickets are requested
to do so before Saturday morning.
Tickets are available in the office of
the Summer Session, Room 1213 An-
gell Hall. Busses leave from in front
of Angell Hall at 8:30 a.m. instead of
8:00 a.m.
Graduate School: Students enrolled
in the Graduate School will not be
permitted to drop courses after Sat-
urday, July 20. A course is not of-
ficially dropped until it is reported in
the office of the Graduate School,
1014 Angell Hall.
Students who have changed their
elections since submitting election
cards should call this week at the of-
fice of the Graduate School, 1014 An-
gell Hall. This involves the dropping
and adding of courses, the substitu-
tion of one course for another, as well
as the change of instructors.
C. S. Yoakum, Dean.
All Summer School Students who
have attended or graduated from
Wittenberg College are invited to an
All Wittenberg Picnic Sunday after-
noon at 4:00. Cars will leave Trinity
Church, Corner of E. William and S.
Fifth Avenue at 4:00. If further in-
formation is desired call 23680, Rev.
Henry Yoder.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments () Occupational Information
has received notice of the following
U. S. Civil Service Examinations:
Principal Statistician and Sr. Sta-
tistician (Div. of Vital Statistics) -
$4,600 to $5,600.
Assistant to Senior Statistician (Bu-
reau of the Census) $2,600 to $4,600.
Agent, Antinarcotic Act - $2,600.
Jr. Poultry Aid to Sr. Poultry Aid -
$1,400 to $2,000.
Notices are on file in 201 Mason
Hall.
Teacher's Certificates Candidates:
All students in the School of Educa-
tion, Literary College, College of En-
gineering, and Graduate School whc
expect to receive a Teacher's Certifi-
cate at the end of the Summer Ses
sion and who have not filled out an
application blank for this purpos
must do so immediately. The ap
plication blanks are available in th
office of the Recorder of the Schoo
of Education, 1437 University Ele
mentary School. Theattention o:
students in the Literary College i
called to the fact that this applica
ion is in addition to the applicatio
made to the Committee on the Teach
er's Certificate of that College.
Bob Ellsworth Wins
50-Yard Free Styl
Bob Ellsworth continued to set th
pace in Intramural swimming compe
tition yesterday as he won the 50
yard free style event, besting Kello
in :30.2. George Frid was third an
W. Buchanan fourth.
Ellsworth's victory kept him in th
lead in total point scoring, with 39C
Kellog, with 330 is trailing.
The 50-yard backstroke event wi:
be helra 5:15 p.m.Mondayin th
Intramural pool. Four of the te
events have been completed, the 25
yard free style, 25-yard backstrok
25-yard breaststroke and 50-yard fre
style.
Bridge Party Held
By Michigan Dame
Fifty women attended the regula
Wednesday afternoon bridge part
given by the Michigan Dames at 2:3
p.m. Tuesday in the Michigan Leagu
League.
Seven prizes were awarded to th
two tables of auction and ten table
of contract bridge. Mrs. Harold wo
the first prize for contract bridg
while Mrs. Fordell won the first priz
in auction bridge.
Other prizes were won by Mrs. Bee

man, Mrs. Morrison, Mrs. T. G. Hob
by, Mrs. Voorheis, and Mrs. Bighan
Mrs. Haynes was in charge of th
party.

F

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IF

As Others See It

LOST: Engraved gold wedding ring
in the Kalamazoo Room of Wom-
en's League. Please return to Mrs.
W. E. Roth. Apt. 5, 209 S State
(Above Chubb's Restaurant). 35
LOST: Gold Theta Sigma Phi soror-
ity pin between Betsy Barbour, and
Library. Please return to Betsy
Barbour office.
FOR SALE
AN T I Q U E JEWELRY, bracelets,
brooches. Earrings, Etc. Reason-
able. 8050. 2020 Devonshire Rd.
5x
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRA D U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.
AIRMAN OFF FOR NORWAY
MONTREAL, July 18. -(P) -
Thor Solberg, Norwegian-American
flier, landed at St. Hubret Airport
near here late today in his plane, the
Lief Erickson,.completing the first leg
of his attempted flight from New York
to Bergen, Norway.

LOST AND FOLTND

LAUNDRY

On Investigating Dictators
CLIFFORD ODETS, playwright and leader of the
15 "investigators" deported from Cuba re-
cently, is full of indignation as a result of his
party's experience. "We are going to organize
another delegation to Cuba," he announced on
landing in New York.
Inasmuch as another party would undoubtedly
encounter the same reception as the first, we hope
Mr. Odets will think again and become practical.
After all, why should there be astonishment over
the Cuban government's summary treatment of his
group? It is a dictatorship, maintaining itself by
force, and investigation is something which no
dictatorship anywhere tolerates. Too, Cuba is a
sovereign nation, and may welcome or bar visitors
as it pleases, just as the United States does. We
agree with Mr. Odets and his friends in con-
demning Cuba's government, we sympathize with
the plight of her people, but we disagree with the
tactics the group used to show its sentiments.
So we offer a suggestion: Mr. Odets is an ac-
complished and forceful playwright, an acknowl-
edged master in the drama of protest. Let him
bend his talents to writing a play about the
Cubans and their troubles. Such a work would*
be a far greater contribution to their cause than
any unofficial investigation. Nor could it possibly
be construed as American interference with Cuban
affairs, which Mr. Odets and his friends rightly
deplore. A play of this sort would attract large
and enthusiastic audiences, both because of the
playwright's skill and the advance advertising
it has received.
--The St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
Let's Have A Debate
N ORMAN THOMAS says that his offer to de-
bate Huey Long "any time and any place"
still holds good. What does the Kingfish say
about this?
Thomas intends to go into Louisiana on a speak-
ing tour, in the course of which, according to a
statement by the executive committee of the So-
cialist party, he will "fully deflate Long as a
candidate for the presidency." Here, then, is an
opportunity for Long to meet Thomas on the Sen-
ator's home grounds.
Long has charged that President Roosevelt is
sending Thomas down into Louisiana. That, of
course, is an absurd thing to say, but if Long
really believes it, there is all the more reason why

is

New Efforts Of
Cooperation To
Be Pushed Here
Great Era Of Constructive
Relations With Other
Universities Seen
(Continued from Page 1)
whose feet I for one often sit in hu-
mility and wonder, has not always
been encouraged by teachers in the
high school and college to feel that
her pursuit and ours are one in kind
and dignity.
"I cannot but hope that the con-
ferences and discussions in which the
representatives of collegiate and sec-
ondary education in this association
are to participate are to bring us into
most fruitful intimacy with each
other, and to lead us to large and
catholic views of education. Never
before, I think, has the interest in
education been so widespread and
profound as it is now. Never before
have so many of our earnest and
gifted scholars been engaged in the
study of educational problems. We
therefore enter upon our work under
the most auspiciousncircumstances.
Fired With Enthusiasm
Fired with enthusiasm for our call-
ing as teachers, let us, representatives
of ten great states, do our utmost
by the deliberations and discussions
of this association, to make our sec-
ondary and higher education of the
highest service to these common-
wealths and to the whole nation."
Even since this declaration of Pres-
ident Angell, Professor Koch pointed
out, the University has attempted to
carry on this principle of co-opera-
tion and has attempted to refine it
wherever possible. In this regard, the
speaker stated, the University has
happily been free from statutory lim-
itations since it, unlike most State
universities, has never been compelled
to accept the graduates from all
standard high schools in the state.
The active work of the Bureau at
present is carried on by three com-
mittees, Professor Koch said. These
committees are the Central Commit-
tee on Co-operation with Educational
Institutions, the Committee on Rela-
tions with Institutions of Higher Ed-
ucation, and the Committee on Rela-
tions with Secondary Schools.
Strives For Two Goals
At present, the Bureau, in addition
to making more adequate its em-
phasis on relationships between the
University and other schools of the
State, is striving for two other goals,
Professor Koch stated. It seeks tc
extend these relationships not only
to secondary schools and junior col-
leges, but to all educational institu-
tions, and a concerted attempt is
being made to co-ordinate and cen-
tralize the activities of the Bureau

LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. lx
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver. Phone 5594.
611 E. Hoover. * 3x
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006,
4x

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MAJ ESTIC
2 ~ MATINEES
2CBALC. EVENINGS
35c Main Floor, Evenings
Ends Tonight
MAY ROBSON
"STRANGERS ALL"
and
LEO CARRILLO
'THE WINNING TICKET"
TOMORROW
Meet The Thin Man's
Hard Boiled Brother
GEORGE RAFT
"THE GLASS KEY"
Dashill Hanmett's-'Thrilling
Story of a pretty tough guy!
MICH IGAN
MATINEES
2 C Balcony Evenings
35c Main Floor Evenings
- Today - Two Features -
All-Mystery Program
WARNER OLAND
"CHARLIE CHAN
INEGYPT"
and
JEAN MUIR JOHN BOLES
"ORCHIDS TO YOU"
Sunday
MIRIAM HOPKINS
"BECKY SHARP"

, 4
Today - Saturday
Ben Bernie, George Raft
"STOLEN HARMONY"
plus
JACK I E COOGAN
"HOME ON THE RANGE"
Sunday - Monday - Tuesday
"GO INTO YOUR DANCE"
plus --
"THE GIRL FROM 10th AVE."

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Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
Perfor-mance Tonight
JOHN
DR IN KWATER'S r
ENGLISH RURAL
COMEDY

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