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July 16, 1935 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


__THE -MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE 'Z

1 7 Lose Lives
Last Week-end
In Accidents
Automobiles Account For
Most Of The Fatalities
And Injuries

THE._MICHIGAN DA _.._AGE..,

Here's Home Run King As He Swats Ote

Over Fence

l

.

..

Cannon Loaded 50
Years kills Child
Ann Arbor Train Hits One;
Pigeon Feeder Dies Of
Fall Off Ladder
Accidents took at least 17 lives in
Michigan over the week-end, auto-
mobiles accounting for most of the
fatalities.
The most unusual accident cost the
life of Richard Bates, nine, of Port-
land, Mich. A toy cannon which his
grandfather, Elton Lyons, had loaded
with powder 50 years ago, exploded
when the boy attempted to burn out
what he thought was an obstruction
in the barrel and Richard was killed.
The grandfather said he had forgot-
ten loading the cannon.
Fannie Marie Olson, nine, o'f Re-
public, fell from a railroad bridge in-
to the Michigamme river and
drowned.
In Detroit, Leopold Vokal fell from
a ladder while feeding pigeons in the
loft of his garage. He thought he had
escaped injury, but died last night of
a neck fracture.
Harm Warsen, 55, McBain farmer,
was struck and killed by an Ann Ar-
bor railroad train.
Fatalities Listed
The traffic fatalities included:
Albert Gasco, 41, of Kalamazoo,
killed by the automobile of Ray Nash,
Lansing, at Kalamazoo.
Robert Conners, 19, of Grand Rap-
ids, killed when his automobile left
the highway.
George Knorr, 65, of Marine City,
killed by the automobile of Amacy
O'Neal, Marine City storekeeper.
Mrs. Edith.Baudreau, 31, of Royal
Oak, was killed and her father, Frank
Gallagher, 63, also of Royal Oak, died
later of injuries suffered in an auto-
mobile accident.
Guy Eastman, 41, of Lapeer, struck
and killed by the automobile of Milton
Truax, 27, Lapeer.
William Fairchild, 45, Pontiac,
killed when his automobile struck a
tree.
John Rosecarren, 19, of Lawton,
who died of injuries suffered in an
accident, July 4.
Halsey Richards, 69, of Croswell,
who died of injuries suffered a week
ago.
Virginia Lee Moser, 17, of Veeders-
burg, Ind., killed by an automobile
near Holland, Mich.
Mrs. Martha McCarthy, 48, wife of
John McCarthy, president of the
Montcalm County Farmers Union,
was killed instantly last night when
the automobile she was driving over-
turned on a highway a short distance
from her home near Edmore.
Five Killed In
Belfast's Riots;
Patrol Streets
BELFAST, Northern Ireland, July
15. - (A)--Steel-helmeted troopers
with fixed bayonets patrolled the
streets today, alert for any new out-
break of the disturbances which re-
sulted in five deaths and the wound-
ing of 74 persons.
Comparative quiet prevailed during
the early hours after a series of re-
ligious riots, originating with last
Friday's celebrations by the Protest-
ant Orangemen of the 245th anni-
versary of the battle of the Boyne.
The latest casualty was seven-year-'
old Kathleen Stewart, who was shot
down by a sniper from behind a
chimney pot last night while she was
playing on a street. She was taken
to a hospital with a bullet in her
shoulder.

A search for arms was pressed to-
day. Police took elaborate precautions
to prevent further bloodshed during
the funeral of two of Friday's victims,
Mary Broderick, 29, and Edward
Withers, 18.

Flattery Gets
His Man For A
New Yrk Cop
NEW YORK, July 15.- (P)-A
little flattery, and out came a crime
secret. To John Mang, accused as
a member of the Brooklyn-Queens
"rifle gang," which eluded police
for three years, a police lieutenant
said:
"It's almost genius the way you
boys always got away. We ought to
name your method after you; that is,
if we had any idea of how you did
it."
Mang beamed and told.
They used two license numbers,
he said, a big one on the rear of
their car, a little number on the
front. Pursued, they drove fast
enough to turn around and double
back.

Recent Graduates'
Engagements Told
In Highland Park
The announcement of the engage-
ment of Margaret McCausey, '34, of
Highland Park to Slyvester Leahy
'34, of Detroit, was made known Sat-
urday at a bridge luncheon at the
home of the bride-elect's parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. W. McCau-
sey. Mr.Leahy is the son of Mrs.
L. J. Leahy, of Alma.
Miss McCausey was affiliated with
Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority, and
during her senior year she was presi-
dent of the Pan-Hellenic association.
Mr. Leahy was a member of Sigma
Nu fraternity.
The luncheon was given for Janet
Allen, '34, of Chesaning, Miss Mc-
Causey's sorority sister, who is a
guest at the McCausey home.
The wedding will take place in the
fall.

i

I-

Where To Go

2 p.m. Majestic Theater, "The Nit
Wits" with Bert Wheeler and Robert
Woolsey.
2 p.m. Michigan Theater, "Esca-
pade" with William Powell.
2 p.m. Wuerth Theater, Jean Har-
low in "Reckless' and Barbara Stan-
wyck in "Woman in Red."
Canoeing every afternoon and eve-
ning on the Huron River, Saunder's
Canoe Livery.
Dancing at the Blue Lantern Ball-
room, Island Lake featuring Clare
Wilson and his orchestra.
- P AT /TRET
WATCH & JEWELRY REPAIRING

-Associated Press Photo
The reason Hank Greenberg, Detroit Tiger star, is leading the American league in home runs so far thi
season is indicated in this strip of action pictures as he demonstrates how he does it. Greenberg's total is 26
eight more than his nearest competitor, and he's hoping to knock out nine more this month to keep up with
Babe Ruth'sall-time = record of 60, set in 1927.

Prisoners Of
State Made To
List Holdings

New Boss Of Scotland Yard Will
Be Game For'Sideline Coache

o -

i

Plan To Have Inmate Able
To Pay Finances Himself
While In Prison
LANSING, July 15. -P(2)- The
state today became a nagging room-
ing house keeper to inmates of its
prisons.
Auditor General John J. O'Hara
launched enforcement of the Delano
bill, designed to make every prisoner
in a state prison, with vulnerable.
property, to pay his own keep. He
sent a questionnaire to every state
prison requiring every inmate to list
his property holdings.
O'Hara has appointed a former as-
sistant attorney general, Ralph E.
Hughes, to enforce the law. A form-
er administration had employed
Hughes to extract from inmates of
state mental and hospital institutions
the cost of their hospitalizaion.
Board Bills Included
Represenative Carl F. Delano, Re-
publican, Kalamazoo, wrote the bill
which was adopted by the legislature
and signed by the governor, and
which will permit the state to force
prison inmates to pay the average per
capita cost of their incarceration and
also pay their board bills since the
time they were imprisoned.
The measure is awaiting the first
contestant on the grounds of its con-
titutionality. Hughes denied a rum-
or that Ralfe McDonald, who will
inherit $250,000 on his majority, and
who slew his mother in Flint, will be
the first defendant in a circut court
suit to collect board for state prison
inmates.
The state legislature passed a law
in 1923 which empowered the auditor
general to collect for hospitalization
fromall monied inmates of sanitoria
and mental institutions.
$207,392 Collected In 1934
Records for the fiscal year of 1934
show the state treated 15,209 such
cases and collected $207,392 from pa-
tients able to pay their own way and
an additional $100,000 in collateral.
The questionnaires mailed to the
State Prison of Southern Michigan
today require each prisoner to give
the name of his guardian, list his real
estate holdings, his ownership of per-
sonal property, his army service, and
the amount of his pension of com-
pensation from the army.
Prosecutor Makes Petition
In order to collect from prisoners
with finances, the auditor general or
local prosecuting attorney must make
a petition in the court in which the
prisoner was sentenced, praying for
funds from his estate to cover the
entire cost of keeping the defendant
prisoner.
The sentencing judge then names a
guardian for the prisoner if he has
had none previously. Dependants
will be considered by the judge in
setting the amount of the payments.
"Previously, persons who became
insane through no fault of their own
were forced to pay for their keep by
the state if they were financially
able," O'Hara commented. "Crimin-
als incarcerated due -to their own ac-
tions were boarded free and spent
their caches after serving their time.

i

LONDON, July 15. - (P) - When
Sir Philip Game becomes boss of
Scotland Yard next November, he
will be open to fire from many critics.
Such has been the experience of
all his 12 predecessors in the post,
officially styled commissionership of
police for the metropolitan area of
London.
The very scope of "The Yard's"
activities makes its chief a bull's eye
for the barbed darts zealous British-
ers are fond of throwing whenever
they think their much vaunted liber-
ties are threatened.
''E's A Blinkin' Tyrant
Even a minor charge in police ad-
ministration may raise a storm of
censure, for the popular mind, the
yard bosses are ruthless autocrats
without due regard for the nation's
democratic traditions.
In addition to preserving order in
Greater London's 700 square miles,
the commissioner must be a born
leader of men.
Past bosses have faced bitter crit-
itism because they allegedly failed to
keep their 30,000 odd constables hap-
py as well as mentally and physically
alert.
Class Favoritism Charged
Much of the public reproof admin-
istered to the retiring commissioner,
Lord Trenchard, arose from his ef-
forts to stop what he called "mental
and physical rot" in the force.
A glut of old men, with no chance
of promotion, had impaired the
force's efficiency, Trenchard held. To
mend matters, he started hiring
young college men on short term en-
gagements not exceeding 10 years.
A nation-wide cry at once arose
that Trenchard was demoralizing the
force by introducing class distinc-
tions. That the reverse was the truth

i
i

SIR PHILIP GAME
was admitted even by policemen wh
the popular fervor had cooled.
Both Trenchard and his predec
sor the late field marshal, Lord Byi
in fact, earned the respect anda
miration of the yard's men fori
spiring the force with their prest
and personality.
It is to carry on this tradition th
Sir Philip Game, with five years
experience in handling recalcitra
New South Wales politicians, has be
chosen to succeed Trenchard.
Johnson & Cushing
YOUR FORD AGENTS
at 400 West washington
Good USED FORDS

Blind Man Throws
Woman To Death
BOSTON, July 15. - (P) - Forest
R. Wells, 30-year-old blind accord-
ionist, was accused today by police
of having thrown his partially blind
parner, Hazel Martin, 25, to death
from a third floor window of a Bos-
ton hotel.
Police inspector Harry Pierce said
Wells, formerly of Detroit, admitted
throwing the girl from the window as
"an act of mercy."

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