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July 16, 1935 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-07-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, JULY 16,193

to a dual government, but, if a dual form of gov-
ernment is what we really need, it is time now to
start encouraging the public in an understanding
of the tremendous problems involved.

T HE POPULAR AMERICAN prac-
tice of a minority attempting to in-
terfere with the wishes of the majority was given
a well-deserved slap in the face in Chicago re-
cently, and reminds us of similar actions here, and
probably in other parts of the nation.
A mass meeting to protest the expansion of
the Reserve Officers Training Corps to 11 addi-
tional high schools in Chicago was called by the
ccmmission on international friendship of the
Chicago Church Federation. Of the more than
800,000 residents of the Chicago area who are
members of the organization, 57 appeared at the
meeting, a rather definite indication to the small
number who were against the R.O.T.C. that they
were barking up the wrong tree.
In our University we have had the same ex-
perience many times. So-called liberal organiza-
tions, which have no reason in the world for
opposing something that is here only for those
who wish to take part in it, periodically clutter
up the campus with their handbills which call
for the abolition of the R.O.T.C. It has always
been a source of wonderment to us, for we can see
no reason for their stand other than a desire to
make some noise.
It is not as if they were sincere in believing that
the military training is detrimental to the future
of the country - that would at least dignify their
actions if it were true. Instead, they are just
against it, as they are against any number of
other things.
We feel that the people of Chicago who stayed
away from the meeting held there were the type
we appreciate seeing in our country - sane, in-
telligent citizens with a true sense of values. And
we say the same concerning those who have noth-
ing to do with the professional agitators in our
schools.

territorial arrangement or acquisition that was
brought about by force of arms. In the following
March, Italy adhered to a treaty. A few weeks
later, many other American powers, including the
United States, did the same.
Thus the doctrine has advanced to the status
of a treaty, accepted by 20 countries; and is well
on its way to become a rule of international law.
This development is traced in Pacific affairs with
great clarity by Kisaburo Yokota, who naturally
ccncludes his inquiry by discussing where Japan
stands in relation to the doctrine.
Mr. Yokota is discovered to be not less in-
genious than his countrymen. He says that Japan
has never disputed the doctrine, that she is en-
tirely in agreement with it, but that it has no
relevance to her action in Manchukuo because
she has never violated the principles which the
doctrine seeks to defend. Therefore, Mr. Yokota
urges that the Pacific states should themselves
conclude a treaty "of which the underlying prin-
ciple would be the Stimson Doctrine, thus streng-
thening immensely the peace machinery in the
Pacific."
How the Japanese must enjoy making faces at
the West!
-The Manchester Guardian.

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
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The abovesrates are for 7% point
type.

CLAS SIFIED
DIRECTORY

WANTED
WANTED: Two college students for
work remainder of summer. Apply
214 Michigan Theater Bld., between
8 and 10. 33
Over-issue newspapers with the ink
bleached out are being used in the
Netherlands Indies in the manufac-
ture of cigarettes for the native trade.
SOCIAL
DANCING
Toe, tap, acrobatics.
Taught daily. Terrace
Garden Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg.- Ph. 96951
Open evenings.

------- ENDS TONIGHT
"RECKLESS" and
"WOMAN IN RED"
Wednesdav -Thursday
KAY FRANCIS
"Living On Velvet"
--Plus
MIARY-FSTO"
,.I A TIEF.

I

MICHIGAN
2 ~ MATINEES
25ot Balcony Evenings
35c Main Floor Evenings
BILL POWELL,the rascal, has his
hands full - and his heart, too,
wtih a gorgeous new leading lady,
in
"Esca pade"
William Powell Louise Rainer
NOVELTIES and NEWS
Thursday - Two Features
WARNER OLAN D
"CHARLIE CHAN IN EGYPT"
and JEAN MU IR
"ORCHIDS TO YOU"

MAJ ESTIC
25c MATINEES
25C BALC. EVENINGS ,
35c Main Floor, Evenings
Ends Tonight
Wheeler and Woolsey
ii a goofy murder story
"THE NIT WITS"

I

BOOKS

_______TOMORROW
Two Choice Features
MAY ROBSON
"STRANGERS ALL"
and
LEO CARR ILLO
"THE WINNING
TICK ET

AMERICANS who, like ourselves, live
almost the year around in a rela-
tively prosperous Universi'ty community are hard
put to it to realize that one out of every six per-
sons in our country is a beggar.
This is not to say that they are of the profes-
sional mendicant type who go about the streets
asking alms. Our "beggars" are of the depression
era, and they solicit their alms from the Federal
government, which in recent years has proved
the most bountiful provider in the history of the
world.
Naturally persons who are financially insolvent
should be given aid in "getting on their feet."
They have a right to a job if they are willing to
work, and work hard.
However in recent months an ominous new
trend in the relief scramble can be noticed.
Many recipients of Federal relief are becoming
slothful, indolent, and constitutionally opposed'
to work of all kinds. They are more than willing
to shun work and remain beggars.
"Why work when I can get more off relief?"
sums up the trend of thought of many in the pau-
per class.
This diseased condition -in which the richest
country on earth degrades its strongest sons to
the point where they will become haggling dole-
grabbers who fight for handouts, not jobs - must
end.
President Roosevelt said in his opening address
to Congress this year that the dole had to stop.
The dole, and all it stands for, goes on apace.
If the President's promise to bring a halt to the
pauperizing of the backbone of the nation just
another forgotten, idly-mentioned "plank"?

By JOHN SELBY
"GOURMET'S BOOK OF FOOD AND DRINK,"
with illustrations by Hendy; (Macmillan).
"GOURMET" is another to be added to that in-
creasing army of modern masters of the
table. Gourmet is a Britisher, of course, and his
tastes are British. But his book is a jewel.
He speaks of composing a meal, and reverently.
Some of his compositions, especially that for a
business man's luncheon, would send a Frenchman
into hysterics, and leave the average "slenderized"
and "beauticianed" female a shivering wreck. He
recommends a real steak, some freshly fried pota-
toes, preceded by a half dozen or more oysters
taken with a small glass of stout!
But what will chiefly endear "Gourmet's Book of
Food and Drink" to other gourmets is the humor
with which it is sprinkled. We happened to open
first to the chapter on sauces. "Our own national
disaster, the so-called 'white sauce,' is, as a rule,
merely a depressing mixture of raw flour and
water. Fortified with alum, which I am told pre-
vents it from going sour, it then becomes bill-
poster's paste, and, -as such, functions satisfac-
torily."
That's a delightful and deserved rebuke to what
is in England certainly a "national disaster." It
also shows what missionary work Gourmet has
cut out for himself.
But there is more than merely sprightly com-
ment in the book. There is a large collection
of grand old recipes -"to make a Pulpatoon of
Pigeons," for example; "banqueting fruits and
conceited dishes" is another. There is also a long
selection of menus, and some modern recipes which
should he in every kitchen for appearance's sake,
even though some are a little elaborate.
Some of the drink recipes are (if the word
may be excused) gorgeous. The best ones are, as
might be expected, rather heavy drinks for cool
weather consumption. It would be unforgiv-
able if Gourmet were to slander English sauces
and neglect to describe good ones. He does just
that, at length.

j LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. dx
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver. Phone 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 3x
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
4x
FOR SALE
HAVING acquired land on Ore Lake
and Huron river, I invite you to
spend a day with us. Enjoy our
fresh spring water. Hard sand
beach. Boating unlimited. Water
frontage at $150 and up. Repre-
sentatives on property. Gentiles
only. E. J. Reive. Ore Lake View
Sub. 32
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRAMED. U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY..
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: During first week of Summer
Session, glasses in brown case. Hex-
agon shaped frames, left lens tinted.
Reward. Box 2.
LOST: A white gold Hafis wrist-
watch. Corner Monroe and Tap-
pan. Finder please phone 2-2117.

I

Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
pening Wednesday
JOHN
DRI NKWATER'S
ENGLISH RURAL
COMEDY
JULY 17,18,19,20 8:30P.M.
Single Admissions: 75c, 50c, 35c Phone 6300

r

I I I 4 I I! ti ff V I 17,

SCREEN

it

AT THE MICHIGAN
PLUS "ESCAPADE"
A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer picture starring Wil-
liam Powell, with Luise Rainer, Frank Morgan,
Reginald Owen, Mady Christians, Virginia Bruce,
and Laura Hope Crews. Also a fairly good comedy,
Paul Tompkins, and a Paramount newsreel.

Luise Rainer isi
actress to reach

undoubtedly the most interesting
Hollywood since Margaret Sul-

lavan happened in a year ago in "Little Man,
What Now?"
"Escapade," a trite little Viennese romance, is
made important by her presence, and more than
entertaining by great performances of a perfect
(Luise Rainer), the companion of a declining
Viennese dowager, thrust into the arms of an
artist and notorious heart-breaker (William Pow-
ell) when the honor of a social butterly (Virginia
Bruce) is endangered. Powell had painted her
with very little clothing on.
The unimportant story finds Leopoldine Major
(Luise Rainer), the companion of an artist and no-
torious heart-breaker (William Powell) when the
honor of a social butterfly (Virginia Bruce) is en-
dangered. Powell had painted.her with very little
clothing on.
That Miss Major and the artist fall in love,
but love triumphs only when the cat-like hatred
of his gun-packing mistress (Mady Christians) is
done with, is a standard accessory.
The quietly beautiful Miss Rainer rises far above
the little Poldi Major of "Escapade." Brightly
small and slim and enchanting, she makes one
forget the silliness of some of the things she is
saying and doing. She can achieve much more,
and will very likely be as great as she is given a
chance to be.
Trivial but beautifully played scene: Poldi try-
ing to remember where she met Powell before,
although she had never before met him.
There are several unhappily brief bits of class-'
ical music running through the film, and also
one of the loveliest of the new melodies - "You're
All I Need." The music of "Escapade" is beau-
tiful.
Completely hidden behind a beard, Frank Mor-
gan, as the jealous and bewildered husband of the
indiscreet young lady, is grand again. His last
poor performance (if there was such a thing) is
quite beyond recollection.

Grio"s
flOA es

pT
unsisno ne ies
Mqakes no Profits'

T1

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