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August 11, 1935 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-08-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY", AUGUST 11, 1935

TH MCHGA.D IL SUNDA..Y. AUGUST a. r s. a a._ -_... 11.,.935

one conclusion wil be reached, that there must be
some sort of a revision in the near future either
;, amateur standards or of the financial care of
competing amateur athletes.
Under the present set-up really worthy favors
are sent underground with consequent unsavory
implications. At the same time there are many
abuses of the existing situation, insecure jobs,
favors and everything but actual gifts.
We cannot recommend professionalizing ath-
letics entircly, for manifest iniquities must result
from that step, but a modification of the rigid
bonds concerning amateurs must be accomplished
to avoid situations such as that in which Owens is
now placed.
le
ARON
THFTOWN "...
BY RUSSELL F. ANDERSON
w We can't vouch for the truth of this story . .
s fresh from a French class-room . in the Ro-
lmance Language building ...the class was orally
translating a story about a cow from French into
English ... cne of the students . .. a high-school
teacher taking work for the summer . .. persisted
in calling the cow "he" . . . until the professor
L .topped her short and said . . . "He is she, miss...
We milk her in the next sentence."
While sitting around the Administration office
... yesterday ... we overheard a prospective fresh-
man . .. for the fall term . . . pester the life out
of one of the secretaries ... for information about
the school .. . 99% of his questions were beside-
the-point ... and silly ... the secretary rightfully
paid little attention to him .. . finally he became
indignant . . . "If I can't get information here,
where can I go?" . .. She told him! . . . precisely
where he could go ... we like her ... for not act-
L ing as a burro of information.
We can't vouch for the turth of this story -.-
according to our informant . . . it happened at
the beginning of the Summer Session . .. true or
not . . . we'll pass it on . . . a professor was at-
tempting to arrange the class alphabetically by
e having the students call out the first two letters
of their names . . . one of the school mam'ms
is to be looked upon with pity ... she said ...
- "I'm B-O, where do I sit?"
* * * *
While working in the library on a thesis last
night (yes ... we work) . .. we found this written
on the fly-leat of a book on municipal government:
If there should be another flood,
For refuge hither fly,
Though all the world should be submerged,
This book would still be dry.
** *
While over in the basement of the Natural
1 Science Building yesterday . . . we noted . .. this
choice little bulletin . . . on one of the boards
just outside of the Forestry Department of-
fice . . . it is instructions . . . to students . . . in
tire-work . . . "The main thing to remember in
lighting a forest fire is to keep cool."
After watching the manner in which "Fatty
Patty" Conger . . . of the Free Press . . . collects
iis news .. . we have a bit of advice .. . to offer}
. . . "the wages of sin are merely deferred tuition2
in the school of experience."

I

i

Body I Recovered

A Washington
BYSTANDER

4

Cass fied Directory

A

By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON -With 18 House Republicans
voting for the administration tax program and
18 Democrats against it, the thing looked like a
50-50 stand-off from a party viewpoint. But was
Here was a bill frankly proposing to change
tax philosophy. The "wealth tax" phrase, coined
to oppose the project just as the "death sentence"
.logan was invented to beat the rigid holding
company control bill, does not fully describe that
change in ,philosophy. The graduated corporation
tax angle ci the bill, imposing higher rates on
the small percentage of "big" corporations and
providing lower rates for the "small" mass of
them, is a far more significant thing than the
rate boosts un highest bracket incomes.
PRIME ISSUE FOR '36
qj7HAT WAS BROUGHT out in the debate. The
Republican party position was sought to be
shown as clearly opposed to the project, lock,
stock and barrel, by such an authorized party
spokesman as Minority Leader Snell. At his esti-
mate a prime issue for '36 was presented, and
gladly accepted by the Republican management.
On the House showdown, about one out of
every five "regular" Republicans, as well as all
the Progressives and Farmer-Laborites, marched
along with the "new deal." The Democratic
defection wvas about one out of every 17.
On a percentage basis related to the representa-
tion of each party in the House, the enormous
majority for the bill takes on enhanced values.
a tax bill at all but just a '36 campaign gesture,
one out of every. five voting regular Republicans
regarded it as too good a gesture to risk a "no."
* * * *
THOSE WESTERN VOTES
HERE is another highly interesting thing
about that House vote. Of the 18 Republican
votes forthe bill, 15 came from western states and
three from eastern. Of the 18 Democratic votes
against it, 13 came from eastern states and 8 from
the west. In view of the generally accepted notion
that the west will be the presidential campaign
battle ground, this notable western trend to sup-
port the "new deal" tax proposals is worth re-
membering foi future reference.
Kansas and Iowa, with four votes. from each
state, led the western regular Republican support
of the bill. Virginia, where Senators Carter
Glass and Hurry Byrd have been decidedly "anti-
new deal" so often, led the Democratic defection
with four votes. Texas and Massachusetts con-
tributed two each and New Mexico, Pennsylvania,
New York, Wyoming, Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia,
New .Jersey and Iowa the balance with one Demo-
cratic "no" vote each. The scattering Republican
"aye" votes came from Minensota and North Da-
kota, two each, and Maine, New York, Oregon,
Pennsylvania. Nebraska and California, with one
each.
The SOAP BOX

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Large Hartman ward-
robe trunk, reasonable. Call 2-2700;
1118 Hill St.
FOR SALE: Scottish Terrier Pups.,
Pedigreed. Reg. A.K.C. Sturdy, loy-
al, companionable. Quality dogs,
reasonably priced. 1313 S. State.
No. 64.
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRAMED. U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.
FOR SALE: Antique jewelry, brace-
lets, brooches, earrings, etc. Rea-
sonable. Phone 8050. 2020 Dev-
onshire Road. 5x

2 GRAD. STUDENTS wish single
rooms with garage for two cars.
Willing to live out of campus dis-
trict. Write Box 42.
SWIM PICNIC
N EWPORT
BATHING BEACH
PORTAGE LAKE
Constantly Changing Water
SOCIAL
DANCING
Toe. tap, acrobatics,
Taught daily. Terrace
Garden Studio. Wuerth
'rheatre Bldg. Ph. 9695
./ Open evenings.

-Associated Press Phoo.
The body of William Brode,
(abcve), 15, who plunged to his
death from a cliff on Lindbergh
peak in the Rcky mountains, was
rcccvered after a 50-hour search in
a granite eraasse near the summit
of the twe-mile-high peak.
h no 'ev
Liquor0 Bu1yin1g
Chaiwe Likely
For Michiioan
Governor Believes State
Should Make Purchases
ThroughBoard
MACKINAC ISLAND, Mich., Aug.
10. - Radical revision of the liquor
control commission's purchasing sys-
tem is under contemplation by Gov.
Fitzgerald, it was learned today.
The governor, resting here with
his family, is pondering the advisa-
bility of having the commission's pur-
chase orders routed through the pur-
chasing division of the Statee admin-
istrative board as orders for coal, gas-
oline and other materials used by
state departments and institutions
now are routed.
When the Liquor Control Commis-
sion began operations, it borrowed
$1,000,000 from the state treasury to
be used as a revolving fund for the
financing of liquor purchases. Once
profits began to roll in, it invested
additional millions in liquor inven-
tories.
The 1935 Legislature, at Gov. Fitz-
gerald's request ,amended the law in
such a way that the commission lost
its complete control of its own fi-
nances. It now is privileged to main-
tain a revolving fund of $1,000,000
but all surplus moneys must be turned
over to the state treasury. Salary
checks for commission employes now
go through the auditor-general's of-
fice in the same manner as checks
for other state employes.
"While the present setup results
from my own bill, I am not entirely
satisfied with it," the Governor said
today. "Now that I have given more
thought to the subject, I don't know
why there should be any revolving
fund of $1,000,00. Possibly there is a
good reason, but I am waiting for
someone to tell me what it is.
"The commission has the privilege
of buying its liquor on consignment.
If the liquor doesn't sell in 60 or 90
days, it is returnable to the company.
I don't know how freely that return
privilege has been employed, nor how
much of the liquor that has been
purchased was purchased on a con-
signment basis. But that certainly
seems the proper basis. If we go out!
and purchase liquor outright, not
knowing whether it will sell, we not{
only run an unnecessary business
risk but also lay ourselves open to
the charge of favoring particular
brands of liquor.
A California highway safety law
requires warning lights be placed 200
feet ahead of and behind a truck
stalled on the road at night.

FOR RENT
4 ROOM furnished apartment. Oil
furnace, one. bedroom studio couch.
209 N. Ingalls. Phone 3403.
No. 68
FOR RENT: 6 room house on Olivea
Avt. $45 a month. Phone 7510.
No. 62.
FOR RENT: Furnished Apts. with
private bath and shower. Also
large double rooms with hot and
cold running water. Garage. Dial
8944. 422 E. Washington. No. 65.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 1x
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver Phone 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 3x
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
4x

i

.......
. __.._

-- Today, Monday, Tuesday -
DICK POWELL
"GOLD DIGGERS
OF 1935"
plus
JOHN BEAL
"LADDIE"
- Added
"WATER BABIES
SILLY SYMPHONY

__._

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N9CHIGAN

NOTICE
WANTED: One or two room fur-
nished apt. with private bath.
Available Aug. 20. Call 7597.
No. 66.
DRIVING AUBURN sedan thru Pitts-
burgh to Hogerstown Tuesday
morning. H. F. Siewert, 914 Hilll
St. Phone 2-2491. No. 67.
WANTED: Kitchenette Apt. Close to
campus preferred. Write Box No.
50. No. 61
Read The Want Ads

25c Until 2P.M. To
MAJESTIC 35c After 2 O'clo
THE THRILL HIT OF THE SUMMER!
CLARK
in JACK LONDON'S greatest story
CALL W

day
vk

Four stars -shouldn't miss; three stars -
very good; two stars - an average picture; one
star - poor; no star - don't go.
AT THE MAJESTIC
"CALL OF THE WILD"
A 20th Century Picture starring Clark Gable,
with Loretta Young, Reginald Owen, and Jack
Oakie. Also a Betty Boop cartoon, a Paramount
scenic pictorial, and a Hearst newsreel.
"Call of the Wild" is a muscular story of Klon-
dike days, but it would have been even better had
the producers gone the whole hog and made it a
leally tough film.
Clark Gable would have been given a bigger
chance and the whole picture would have less of
the Boy Scout atmosphere -which is the unin-
spiring result of its "wholesome" vigor.
There are plenty of things to like about "Call
of the Wild," however. Snow and mountains and
rushing streams, well-photographed, offer a fault-
less background. The dog who plays Buck is a
fine actor, and the animal scenes in which he
appears are perfectly natural.
After his fine performance in "Escapade" as the
bewildered and betrayed musician, Reginald Owen
comes right back with an impressive portrayal of
a villain so smooth and heartless as to bless any
story. Clark Gable, with his days as a semi-ham
far behind, is learning new things with every pic-
ture. Fat Jack Oakie is as funny as ever.
Only nectareous Loretta Young, through no
great fault of her own, fails to hold up her end.
Such dainty young girls would hardly trek miles
through the frozen wastes of the bawdy Alaska of
Gold Rush days. Or if they would, their perma-
nept waves and powered cheeks wouldn't remain
in the immaculate condition that Miss Young's did.
Oakie gets hold of a map showing the way to
possibly rich gold fields which an old prospector
named .Blake discovered before he died. He and
Gable strike out into the wilderness, after Buck,
the dog, has won $1,000 for Gable, who bet Smith
(the villain) that the St. Bernard couldn't draw
1,000 pounds 100 yards.
There they find a young female relative of
Blake's, alone and harried by wolves after her
husband has wandered off to almost certain death
in the cold wastes. The three push on to the gold

Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidentialupon request. Contributors are asked
to be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words and to accept or reject
letters upon the criteria of general editorial importance
and interest to the campus.
Business Of Cashing Checks
To The Editor:
NE OF THE MOST LOATHSOME if not the
most impregnable situations that I have had
to contend with this session, is that of having
checks cashed.
One hears from all sides students bemoaning
trne fact that they are unable to get cash in re-
ceipt of a check. Is it not true that some (a small
minority) have fraudently passed on bad checks,
but in a Democracy, such as our, should not the
majority rule?
I recall on one occasion where an honest stu-
dent, because he has had trouble in getting a
check cashed says that he will not return for the
summer of '36. He seems to have more trouble
with a check than he would for a whole eight hour
course. He k. thoroughly disgusted.
It appears to us that a University with high
principles and ideals as ours would seek to mother
and cater to her students more habitually, instead
of allowing them writhe in pain over financial
status. It is bad enough not to have money, but
when you have it and can't get it; then is when
it hurts.
We might suggest that our social and pedagogi-
cal demagogues work out a system of exchange.
We picked up this prize tid-bit ... yesterday .. .
would think that the unmerciful banking officials
would get down on their knees if the University
were to take over exchange by setting up a system
of its own.
If such a thing were to come I am sure that a
day would be set aside by all sympathizers to pay
homage to such a noble and worthy act.
Must we traditionally do that which was done,
and call it unconstitutional, or shall we change
for the good of the cause in a natural way to the
new order? Those of us who have had trouble in
getting cash, and there are many, might well ap-
preciate the true significance of this letter.
-G.L.J.
Italy wants to borrow money from France for the
Ethiopian campaign. As an old war debtor herself,
France doubtless knows all the answers.
-The Detroit News.

_:
a

L O R E T TA
YOUNG

with

.LACKr
J AK C t
O KD

YOUNG

Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
LAST TWO PERFORMANCES
Of the 193 5 Season
G. MARTINEZ-SIERRA'S
"TfIE KINGDOM OF
TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY at 8:30
Single Admissions: 75c, 5c, 3 5c Phone 6300

AU

I

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