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August 03, 1935 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-08-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1935

died. These McGehees are, of course, those of "So
Red the Rose." And Cousin Micajah's gallantry
in making jewelry for the girl he loved out of the
first gold he mined in California is a typical Mc-
Gehee gallantry.
There are 19 sketches in "Feliciana," and all but
two are about the south or southerners.
AROUND
THE FTOWN .. .
By RUSSELL F. ANDERSON
ie We spent most of yesterday hanging about the
n local police department . . . after watching the
, blue-coated boys come in and out . . . we have
a bit of warning for our readers . . . there is a little
drive on, to pick up all speedsters . . . and from
the amount of culprits brought in yesterday we're
inclined to think that they're in earnest . . . sev-
eral summer school session students were among
r those brought down ... we nearly passed away from
laughter at the antics of a school teacher--
a summer session student ... who begged that her
name not be placed on the police blotter . . . but
with tears in her eyes (and there was real salt
11 in them) she wrote it down . . . so let us warn
t you to be careful ... you should know that the
local police work on the theory that every city
has an inherent right to be seen by the passing
motorist!
v We're still blushing ... on our way back to the
x Press Building last night . . . we passed a local
. church . .. (the one that is having the rummage
sale today) ... out in front there was a sign (and
' still is) . . . printed on a large sheet of wrapping
per ... it reads . . "Women of the congregation
have cast off clothing of all kinds. They may be
Dseen in the basement today between three and
r five."
* * * *
Speaking of the church reminds us of an inci-
dent that occurred last Sunday.. . that we almost
forgot to tell you about . . . it was a sermon we
heard, given by a minister who is an ardent believer
m the evils of drink . . . towards the latter part
cf his sermon ... he reached the climax with the
y statement . . . "that if I had my way about it,
e all spirits and alcohols would be dumped in the
1, river" .. . and we nearly fell out of the pew .. .
when he finished. . . and announced that the next
s hymn would be "We Will Gather At The River."
* * * *
e Yesterday afternoon one of our lecturers told us
that . .. brass may become the materials for all
ornaments . . . that leads us to remark that we
s know a number of sorority girls (and a few summer
- session school mams) ... who will be 100 per cent
decorative!
- During our wanderings ... following the above-
d mentioned lecture ... we had occasion to go over
s to the University elementary school ... in passing
- down one of the corridors we overheard a teacher
questioning her little charges . . . "If the plural of
w mouse is mice, does it follow that the plural of
t spouse would be spice?" . . . we didn't catch the
e answer ... as we had passed down the hall .. .
n but we wish we had ... as the darn thing has been
- bothering us all way ... the plural of spouse? ...
- the only word we can think of is bigamy!
n * * * *
c We think all puns belong in a certain rank ...
but having stumbled on the rankest . .. we pass it
h on . .. the setting is local . . . the athlete comes
e running in . . . and remarks . . . YOST FIELD
e HOUSE strong I am!
s -
t A NEW YORKER
as
yAT LARGE
t
By JAMES B. RESTON
NEW YORK -- A confirmed femininst, Mary
Pickford has started out to prove that she
can attain as high a rank in the production of mo-

d tion pictures as she once did as an actress.
This was a sudden decision, as all her decisions
are. She was thinking of coming back to the New

__ _ ____

The SOAP BOX
Letters published in this column should not be
construes as expressingtheseditorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked
to be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words and to accept or reject
letters upon the criteria of general editorial importance
and interest to the campus.
Some Disconnected React ions
Dear Soap Box:
Here follow some disconnected reactions:
Your contributors should be prevented from
throwing "ilk" at one another. The word is mean-
ingless anywhere this side of a Scotch Peerage.
The two stories you credit to Donal Haines were
probably old when Donal was drumming on his
high chair. A generation ago the sergeant in-
structor took keen pleasure in telling about the
quick and the dead to each new platoon of gas
rask novices. And the boat on heavy dew goes
back certainly as far as Twain.
We are told at intervals that (R) means truth
told interestingly. Let us look back beyond this
reek's " . . . pasty-faced youth whose defense is
based on a plea of congenial insanity . . . " to
a story released by (A) on Feb. 26, 1935. A Detroit
high school was on fire and "when the tons of
water failed to check the rush of the flames po-
licemen ordered the occupants of 16 homes to
evacuate." If that is truth-told-interestingly, what
is to become of our liberties?
Finally, why razz the Nazis as if they were the
first to make a fetish of blood? A still popular
national hymn contains the prayer "Qu'un sang
impur abreuve nos sillons. Marchons." Let an
alien blood fill up our furrows. Let's go!
Yours in all seriousness,
-Norman Anning.

Sex-Mad Slayer Snte nced To Electric Chair

-Associated Press Photo.
A circuit court jury which deliberated less than, four hours in
Peoria, Ill., found Gerald Thompson guilty of the slaying of pretty Mil-
dred Hallmark, with a mandatory sentence of death in the electric chair.
Thompson (left) is being returned to his cell after the verdict was read.

The Careers And Personalities
ur enators: Key Pittan

I

Washington
Off The Record

By SIGRID ARNE
KATHERINE HARRISON, daughter of the sen-
ator from Mississippi, had a longer vacation
than she had planned, because she got into a tight
spot.
She and Senator McAdoo of California were
leaving a Delaware resort for Washington the same
day. McAdoo is an enthusiastic flier. Miss Har-
rison is not. But McAdoo offered her a lift in his
airplane, and she accepted.
When they arrived at the airport, Miss Harrison
had had time to do some thinking. She looked
back to the ocean, sighed, and said, "Oh, its so
beautiful. I think I'll go back for another week."
And she did.
Washington has no more faithful public
servant than old Frank Cittidino who was the.
last of the lamp lighters. When the new elec-
tric switches were attached, he worried. To
this day, he makes a daily round of 56 gas
lamps left in the city to see that their mechan-
ical controls have not failed.
EPRESETATIVE DEWEY SHORT of Missouri
played the part of his own ghost at a political
meeting held in his state. He was making several
speeches in the Mid-West. His schedule was so full
his Washington secretary, worried that he would
fail the homefolks, sent them a long wire signed
with Short's name.
But Short knew nothing of the wire. He headed
for the conclave and arrived just as the chairman
finished reading his wire to the meeting.
The invitation list to a formal dinner in-
cluded the name of a suprem court justice.
He declined by a note to the hostess explain-
ing, "I have to spend the evening at home seek-
ing the least erroneous solution to a seemingly
insoluble problem."
UHERE are several trees on capital grounds
Hgrowing incognito. They are those known to
have been planted by George Washington. The di-
vision of buildings and grounds will not reveal
their identity in order to protect them from sou-
venir hunters.
WHEN OCCASION PERMITS, Vice-President
Garner likes to play tricks with the name of
his secretary, Louis Friday.
Friends drop into Garner's office for aid and ad-
vice. He looks exceedingly solemn and finishes
with, "Better take it up with Friday Saturday."
"What day?" says the perplexed friend.
"Saturday."
"Yes, but what did you say about Friday . .
and so on until Garner has had his joke.
Congress has a Frank Buck, Jack Dempsey,
Jim Farley, Will Rogers and John McCormack.
But they are not the wild animal trapper, the
fighter, the postmastr general, the humorist
or the singer. They are respectively the rep-
resentatives from California, New Mexico, In-
diana, Oklahoma and Massachusetts.
HANFORD MacNIDER, a former assistant sec-
retary of war, has deep sympathy for admin-
istration speech-makers. When one worries in
PlacNider's hearing, he tells of the commencement
speech he made at West Point.
He labored several nights over the address. The
day of the ceremony he sat on the platform next
to a doughty major general who growled: "Well, the
greatest commencement address ever made here
was made by General Sherman. It was just one
sentence:
"'Gentlemen, you now belong to the army.'"

WASHINGTON, Aug. 2. - (IP) -
The senate really likes spare, quiet
Key Pittman. For a decade his dem-
ocratic colleagues kept nominating
him for president pro tempore. Now
that his party has control, he oc-
cupies that honorary post.
Behind Pittman are memories of
gold rushes to Dawson, Alaska, and
Tonopah, Nev., in which a frail
youngster from the south learned
about the brawling, pioneer west.
But the senator from Nevada to-
day is an impeceably dressed, soft-
voiced symbol of dignity. He avoids
free-for-all debate save at times
when foreign relations, for which he
is senate spokesman, silver policy or
western issues are up. Unobtrusive,
he speaks quietly, striding back and
forth as he does so.
Hunting and fishing, the recrea-
tions of his youth in the west, ap-
peal more to Pittman than golf. His
CLASSIFIED
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Antiques, glassware, fur-
niture, jewelry, doll furniture, books,
many other miscellaneous items.
408 S. Seventh St. (Near W. Lib-
erty). Dial 7068.
FOR SALE: 1931 Ford de luxe road-
ster. Priced for quick sale. Inquire
R. Read, 610 Forest, Phone 2-1214
or 6539.
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(F.ENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRAMED. U L R I C H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.
FOR SALE: Antique jewelry, brace-
lets, brooches, earrings, etc. Rea-
sonable. Phone 8050. 2020 Dev-
onshire Road. 5x
NOTICE
WOULD COOK and plan for a small
fraternity. Next semester. Can
supply references, white. Dial 7723.
41
LARGE Elberta and Hale peaches
will ripen about Aug. 7, special price
to trucks. A. E. Epler, Keensburg,
Ill., Wabash Co.
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. lx
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver Phone 5594
611 E. Hoover. 3
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
4x
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Gray and black enameled
Evans cigarette lighter in Women's
League Bldg. on Thursday, July 25.
Reward, J. F. Bailey, 822 Oakland,
Phone 2-3872.
49

rod and gun feats are not mere con-
versation.
In the celebrated Alfalfa club, that
jovial organization to which only
"good fellows" are admitted, he is a
high ranking member.
Pittman was an early "Roosevelt
man," performing service for the
President's candidacy in the west.
He has been in the senate since 1912,
but is no veteran office-seeker and
was first elected without passing
through earlier campaigns as most
senators do.
His first political appointive place
was that of prosecuting attorney in
hard-living Nome, Alaska, who's
"consent" form of government he
helped to draft back at the turn of
the century.
His personal friendships in the
senate help him to expedite commit-
tee business. Every senator knows
"Key."
ST. LOUIS THEATER BURNS
ST. LOUIS, Mo., Aug. 2. - (A) -
Fire early today destroyed the Odeon
theater, which for many years wps
the scene of the St. Louis symphony
orchestra concerts.
Twice in one game Dick Bartell of
the Giants reached second on his own
bunts: each time a fielder flung the
ball into right field.
MICHIGAN

Graf t-C argo
Aoainst O.S.U.
By Governor
I)eclares Professors Are
I Pay Of Corporations
And Public Utilities
CHILLICOTHE, 0., Aug. 2. - () --
A bitter controversy between Gov.
Davey and officials of Ohio State Uni-
versity flared up today with the state
executive charging that senior pro-
fessors of the university are in the
pay of "big corporations, including
public utilities."
Gov. Davey made the charges last
night while addressing 1,500 persons
at the Clarksburg field day.
"If I had my way, I would 'can'
the senior professors at Ohio State,"
he said.
"They work two hours a day, five
days a week and take three month
vacations each year. -They write
books and articles for pay; they lec-
ture for pay and they work for big
corporations, including the public util-
ities for pay."
The governor's attack came only
a few hours after John sB. yullen
secretary of the University's Alumni
association asserted Davey had made
"dishonest assertions" about the uni--
versity's president, Dr. George W.
Rightmire.
Fullen sent a bulletin to all district
alumni governors and officers of the
alumni clubs asserting that "Mr. Da-
vey said at Akron Sunday that 'Pres-
ident Rightmire slipped in a $3,500
raise for himself in preparing the uni-
versity's budget and when I cut it
out he made an ill-tempered attack
on me."
Fullen's note said "Mr. Davey knows
that the university's budget was pre-
pared in strict accordance with the
instructions of the state director of
finance ... who specifically instructed
the university to allow for salary re-
storations, in accordance with action
of the legislature."
"..'.~ ~ ysterious,
.,.~,-.. an*Iiai
year's stran-.
est\romance
--powerful
yet tender!
Adolph Zk pr...nt
WARN E R
f myterous

11 ALISVN I

York stage, of doing anything
to keep her working hard when
the United Artists corporation
was reorganized and she de-
.ided to go into the production
end of the industry. Since
then, she has been coming to
New York regularly and the
3rrival of Mary Pickford is still
in event even in this town.
She seems somehow to have
decided to lose herself in ac-
tivity. Her interest runs to
countless organizations, all of

R UTHLESS DRAMA,
that crackles with thrills
..throbs with romance!
with
LIONEL BARRYMORE
C1130 LEAN ARTHUR
.0oV HESTER MORRIS
Calto( f G-MSuccessor to
House":

C
LMARY PICIKFORD

gSIPWDRTH
a Walter Wanger
oil u C t i OUs
A Paramount Picture
MA JEST IC

11

-_ ..

..:

11 vwhich she works at with indefatigable energy.
By JOHN SELBY Now, at 42, she seems a peaceful and fascinating
"FELICIANA," by Stark Young; (Scribners), woman. She was at the Waldorf when I saw her
Ehis time, working in a huge suite in the towers,
N APPRAISAL of Stark Young's "Feliciana" i suite flooded with light from several large win-
will prove difficult for numerous reasons. lows which look away to the south across magnifi-
The most interesting is that Mr. Young's stories lent buildings. Within an hour there, she received
are mostly sketches, and many of them are negro two long distance calls from Hollywood, another
sketches written from the viewpoint of the south- from London, and another from Chicago.
erner of the ruling class, which is understand- In the other room sat 11 or 12 reporters wait-
able and for Mr. Young proper. But there is in- ng for interviews; press agents interrupted her
cluded the feeling that the upper class southern Jonversation; the door-bells whirred, the servants
white is the protector of the Negro, and a good bustled around. And all this she took as calmly
many who are familiar with the situation see it the is if she were alone in her huge Beverly Hills
other way. These feel that the Negro was not only home.
the base of the southern pyramid, but that it also * * * *
was he who protected his master. NEW YORK clamored to see her in the play Co-
So it is that Mr. Young's sketches will sound off quette, which she recently presented on the
key to a certain number of readers. This circum- ;oast, but she would not bring it back East. She
stance is unfortunate, for there is a great deal ,xplained that once she had seen Helen Hayes
(ifr charm in "Feliciana." Even when the charm plav the same part, and she considered Miss Hayes'

Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
Perform nce Tonight
+ DOUBLE BILL

Sir Janmes M. Barre's -
Mystery Satire,

"Shall We

Mol iere's Satire
on the
Medical Profession
Te Doctor
h'In Spite Of
-NHimself""

Join The
Ladies?"

lF.7t wuEeTU1

;II

1 1

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