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July 23, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1935-07-23

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JULY 23, 1935

a4
TUSY,_LY...13

Y

A Washington
BYSTANDER

SCRE E'N

Billion Dollar Increase In Farm,
Incomes Seenl As Prices Rise.

Ii

By KIRKE SIMPSON

WASHINGTON - On top of many other cares
and worries, two new things are adding to the
fervor with which Congress privately is hoping for
a miracle which will permit early adjournment.
And the weather isn't one of them.
One of the two new factors is the double-bar-
relled House-Senate investigation of lobby activ-
ities as to the "death sentence" controversy over
the utilities holding company bill. The other is an
impending new deluge of letters and messages
against the administration's surprise tax proposals.
If forecasts from New York are to be trusted, the
new wave of "write-your-congressman" communi-
cations bids fair to surpass even the utility bill
peak.
* * * * .
CHAMBER'S DRIVE
IT IS NOT ONLY that the Chamber of Commerce
of the United States has announced an or-
ganized "drive" against the tax legislation. Con-
sidering the 1,500 member organizations through
which the chamber operates, that is a daunting
prospect enough for Congress members and their
office staffs. Now, however, big corporation heads
have been "talking tax turkey" to stockholders
numbering hundreds of thousands. If they re-
spond to Congress by mail as expected, Postmaster
General Farley is likely to find his mail revenues
jumping up again this summer.
There is an odd side to it. At the first House
committee hearing on the tax proposals, a treasury
expert made the off-hand estimate that if a grad-
uated corporation tax was substituted for the pres-
ent flat tax, about 95 per cent of the now taxable
corporations would get a cut in rates, no change, or
a trivial increase. By his calculation, the weight
of the tax increase would fall almost wholly upon
the remaining 5 per cent of "big time" companies.
CONGRESS WILL HEAR
T MIGHT be thought that a proposition offering
tax reductions to the great mass of corporations
would find favor with that mass. If anybody
ever objected to having his tax rates lowered his-
tory failed to make proper note of him. Yet
against that is to be set the fact that it is the
big corporations which have stockholders by the
hundreds of thousands with the notion that the
graduated tax plan will mean lower dividends on
their stock holdings.

AT THE MICHIGAN
PLUS "BECKY SHARP"
A Pioneer Picture in Technicolor with Miriam
Hopkins, Cedric Hardwicke, Alison Skipworth,
Francis Dee, and Alan Mowbray. Also a Mickey
Mouse cartoon, "Mickey's Kangaroo," a Grantland
Rice Sportight, "Animal Intelligence," and a Para-
mount newsreel.
The new and vivid technicolor saves "Becky
Sharp" from being too disappointing, although the
transcription of "Vanity Fair" to the screen is
spotty in several ways.
Briefly (because so much has already been said)
technicolor's future will be safe only if producer's
refrain from making it a gaudy display. This
blunder is threatened in "Becky Sharp" but for
the most part the colorful dress and settings are
compatible with the scenes of "Becky Sharp."
There are only a few outdoor scenes in "Becky
Sharp," yet it is in them that technicolor makes
its greatest improvements over ordinary photog-
raphy.
After a shaky start, the picture pulls itself to-
gether somewhat and the story of Becky, after the
Battle of Waterloo, is faithfully and effectively
told. Minor characters are neglected throughout,
and the first part of the story is extremely epi-
sodic.
But despite these omissions it is fortunate that
"Becky Sharp" isn't as lengthy as "David Copper-
field." Twice as much of the ordinary acting
and adaptation would double its faults.
Miriam Hopins is a good Becky, but not nearly
as good as she might have been. She is seldom a
clever actress, and her frequent harsh shouts are
irritating.
Cedric Hardwicke gives easily the best perform-
ance as the nobleman with whom she carries on a
liason. Alan Mowbray, as her husband, is lifeless.
He has done much better in far less important
parts.
Alison Skipworth has little more than a bit role,
and Frances Dee, as Amelia, mopes gently.
"Becky Sharp" is acceptable to the cinemagoer
because, whenever he becomes bored or disappoint-
ed in the story, he can enjoy the color.
The short subjects - Mickey Mouse cartoon -
always the best; sportlight - interesting compari-
sons of animal intelligence; the newsreel -one of
the most entertaining in many a day.
-R.A.C.
The SOAP BOX
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked
to be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words and to accept or reject
letters upon the criteria of general editorial importance
and interest to the campus.
The Horror Of It All
Dear Sir:
It is with the utmost regret that I notice the
advertisement which appears on the front cover
of the Student Directory. It is bad enough that
the law should allow the purveyance of the foul
liquid, but to have mention of it on the front page
of an official publication of the University of
Michigan is a thing which fills me with indigna-
tion.
The younger generation of today has shown
that it intends to pay no attention to the advice
of those who undoubtedly know better than they,
and, as a result, beer has become a favorite drink
among these deluded young people. It therefore
seems to me that it is the duty of those of us
who recognize the dangers of alcoholic drinks to
see that all mention of intoxicating drinks should
be kept from respectable publications. Such a
place should go to something much more deserving,
perhaps to a schedule of the all important lectures
that will take place this summer. This at least
would be educational and of interest to all.
Yours truly,
-Indignant.

NEW YORK, July 22. -- AP) -- A
billion dollar increase in the farm
value of agricultural production this
year has been forecast on the basis
of rising prices paid to farmers
coupled with a comparatively stable
cost of living in rural communities.
Standard Statistics Co. estimates
a prospective gross farm value of
$8,860,000,000 this year compared
with $7,869,000000 in 1934, an in-
crease of 12.6 per cent.
The figures are based on the 22 per
cent rise in the last year in prices
which farmers receive for their labor
and on the 5 per cent increase in
prices which the farmer himself pays
for commodities which he buys. The
total, it is pointed out, should not
be confused with cash income, which
should be somewhat smaller than
gross value.
Other Groups Beneilt
Estimated benefits to the farmer,
however, are only one side of the ec-~
onomic picture, since those persons
who business is based in whole or in
part on sales to rural areas have
opened to them the prospect of great-
ly enlarged sales this fall and winter.
Such buying power is backed by
the revelation of other surveys that
farmers for several years have de-
ferred buying equipment for their
farms, and in the early part of this
year from implement manufacturers
were harrassed to step up production
fast enough to meet the demand.
Right now the implement compan-
ies are scaling output higher than for
the last few summers in order to stock
dealers in anticipa tion of fal and
winter requirements.
The Standard survey of gross farm
income estimates at 43.9 per cent in-
cre'ase in grain values in 1935 over
last year, and 8.9 per cent rise in cot-
ton value and a reduction of 7.7 per
cent in value of other crops, a net in-
crease of 5 per cent.
Livestock Value Up
Livestock value is given an estimat-
ed rise of 33.8 per cent while poultry,
dairy and other products are estimat-
ed at 13.3 per cent ahead of last year,
an aggregate rise of 21.8 per cent.
While the increase in gross farm
income is placed at 14.2 per cent
higher this year (a reductioneinthe
estimated total of bounties and other
payments cuts the gross increase to
12.6 per cent.
Although some commentators have
feared an adverse effect on farm pop-
ulation might attend a supreme court
decision holding the Agricultural Ad-
justment Act invalid ,it is shown that
federal payments to farmers have
been small when compared with the
Penknife Carver Scorns
Machines, Modern Tools
TULSA, Okla., July 22. - (/P) -
With several penknives, a lot of pa-
tience and a slab of pine wood, A. (j.
Abraham has developed a hobby that
creates artistic furniture and ona-
ments.
Abraham scoffs at machines and a
work bench lined with tools. Most of
his work could not be done with ma-
chinery, for it consists of interlocking
wooden chains.
The most elaborate product of his
labors is a lamp table 12 by 30 inches.
The top is made of one piece. On
either side are chains cut from the
same piece of wood as the top. The
legs are decorated with covered
trenches inclosing spheres which
move freely. Thirty balls are carved
within the trench.

huge total of cash brought by crops
and livestock.
On that score, Standard comments:
"The income to farmers from this
source is not highly important; the
$10,000,000 estimated would represent
less than 6 per cent of the gross value
of farm production and less than 8
per cent of cash receipts from the
marketing of crops and livestock."
U - S 1 -- ----- - -
CLASSIFTED
LAUNDRY
LAUNDRY. 2-1044.~ Sox darned
Careful work at low price. lx
PERSONAL laundry service. We take
individual interest in the laundry
problems of our customers. Girls'
silks, wools, and fine fabrics guar-
anteed. Men's shirts our specialty.
Call for and deliver. Phone 5594.
611 E. Hoover. 3x
STUDENT Hand Laundry. Prices rea-
sonable. Free delivery. Phone 3006.
4x
LOST AND FOUND
GREEN SCHAEFFER life-time pen.
Barrel engraved "Reuel Sparks."
Dial 6537. 38
LOST: Alpha Chi Omega pin. Please
return to I. Champion, 718 Tappan.
Phone 2-3203. Name is on back.
Reward. 37
LOST: Diamond wedding ring near
University Hospital. Finder please
call 2-5872 or 822 Oakwood. Re-
ward.
GOLD FOOTBALL, with black raised
"W" inscribed. Thursday after-
noon Dial 7784. H. 0. Robinson.
FIELD GLASSES, No. 18 zoology de-
partment, University. Warner &
Swazey from Roam 1116 N. S. Bldg.
Reward. Dial 5733 or Zoology dis-
pensary.
FOR SALE
ORIGINAL ETCHING BY DUBAIN-
NE-(FRENCH ARTIST) SCENE
LUXEMBURG GARDENS - $10
FRAMED.CU LRIC H'S BOOK-
STORE, CORNER EAST AND
SOUTH UNIVERSITY.

WELL, OF ALL THINGS
Approximately 35,000 buzzards have
been taken in traps on a large ranch
in Llano. county, -Texas, during the
last 10 years.
SWIM PICNIC
NEWPORT
BATHING BEACH
PORTAGE LAKE
Constantly Changing Wat

I

MAJ ESTIC
2 5 MATINEES
35c Main Floor, Evenings
Ends Tonight
GEORGE RAFT
T n
"TH E GLASS KEY"

MICHIGAN
Z 'MATINEES
25C Balcony Evenings
35c Main Floor Evenings
Color
Marvel Tonigh
MIR IA
HOPKINS
FRANCES DEE
CEDRIC HARD WICKE
BIILLIE BURiKE
ALISON SHIPWORTIH
NICEL BRUCE * ALAN MOWDRAY
Added Joy
"MICKEY'S KANGAROO"
Mickey Mouse Cartoon
"ANIMAL INTELLIGENCE"
Novelty Tompkins News
Thursday - Two Features
Kay Francis Arline Judge
"STRANDED" "COLLEGE SCANDAL"

Congress is going to hear about that,E
often. Only an adjournment right nowN
tax bill could stem that prospective tide
from home.

early and
without a
of letters

As OthersSeeit
Tribulations In Education
EDUCATORS frequently review the finished evi-
dences of their work covering a period of time
and wonder whether they're going about the
thing in at all the right way. The people who have
gone through the mill do not seem to be finished
with any sort of accuracy. It is for the most part
a sloppy product. It does not indicate that any-
thing like an exact science has been at work. Al-
most any other nachine can be turned out more
reliably than the human machine when general
results are observed.
This goes along with the most amazing special-
ized expertness, for, after all, a human machine
is the only one that can make any other machine.
Somewhere there's a human machine back of the
whole process, and specialized ingenuity, expert-
ness, and skill would indicate that training could
produce any kind of human being needed. That
statement, of course, does not take account of the
things which the human being possibly might
be expected to do and hasn't done, many of them
being things as yet unperceived, if even imagined.
The very expertness of the very skilled achievers
does by contrast produce a great mass of new
illiterates composed of people who can use things
they don't know anything about. One genius or
one highly trained man can give uses to millions
who do not understand the process by which they
do what they can do. What distresses the educa-
tors from time to time is not the difference be-
tween highly specialized knowledge and the mass
ignorance, but the faults of the masses in simpler
things, things which have been covered by gen-
eral education and which are possible of exactness
in learning.
One trouble that education can hardly avoid
is that it encounters its subject at his age of great-
est resistance. Often it is long after exposure
to education that the person's real curiosity de-
velops. When he had time his curiosity didn't
urge him against other inclinations. When it
begins really to stimulate him he hasn't the time
to satisfy it. Many a fellow looks back upon his
school days as the days of his hardest work.
Nothing in making his living was really as hard
as some of the experience he had with tough
problems and lessons which seemed to defy his
mind to grasp, while all the time the pleasant
outside world offered delightful activities from
which study held him back. There were bright
youngsters to whom things came easy, but the
average student found the going hard and the
profit was but little apparent.
Modern pedagogery has softened some of these
rigors, but still life for the pupil is not explained or
justified in the terms of the classroom. Amer-
icans, being essentially amiable, do not like to
bear down brutally on the student age and pound
studies in with a strict discipline, demanding pre-
ciseness and exactitude and forming a mind which
rejects inaccuracy. Some school systems have been

i,

SOCIAL
DANCING
Toe, tap, acrobatics.
Taught daily. Terrace
Garden Studio. Wuerth
Theatre Bldg. Ph. 9695
Open evenings.

1' F

LYDIA MEN'DELSSOHN THEATRE
MICHIGAN
REPERTORY
PLAYERS
present
Wednesday, Thursday,
4 Friday & Saturday
r July 24, 25, 26, 27,
at 8:30 P.M.
Single Adm. 75c, 50c, 35c
Special Matinees
"THE PRINCESS AND MR. PARKER"
Friday & Saturday, July26 & 27 at 2:30 P.M.
Adults 50c Children 25c Phone 6300

I

BOOKS

-- ENDS TONIGHT
"GO INTO YOUR DANCE"
- plus -
"THE GIRL FRDM 10th AVE."
TOMORROW
PATRICIA ELLIS
"HOLD 'EM YALE"
plus
Jackie Cooper in "DINKY"

4"

1' H
By JOHN SELBY
"MURDER IN THE PARK," by Cecil Freeman
Gregg (Dial); "DEATH CATCHES UP WITH
MR. KLUCK," by Xanitippe, and "ROGUE'S
HOLIDAY," by Maxwell March (both Crime
Club).
THIS DEPARTMENT picked up Cecil Freeman
Gregg's "Murder in the Park" about 11 o'clock
one hot night recently. Which accounts for a
missed train the next morning. It's very, very dif-
ficult to put down Mr. Gregg's book.
The book is about a certain 50,000 pounds one
Mr. Pencoch was supposed to be about to pay
somebody, at his country house not far from Lon-
don. At the start the cast of characters is four
-Mr. Pencoch, Mrs. Pencoch, their daughter Ivy
and William Williams, one of Mr. Pencoch's nu-
merous stooges. William is a most interesting
chap.
The story pops from complication to complica-
tion without tangling the reader. The action is
incredibly fast, the dialog as real as mud, the
denouement smart. What more could one ask
of a mystery novel?
Unless, of course, you prefer the sophisticated
sort, of which "Death Catches Up With Mr. Kluck,"
by someone who calls herself "Xanitippe," is an
excellent example.
This one concerns the quite unforeseen death
of Mr. Caesar Kluck while listening to the radio
program of which he is the annoying and highly

i

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