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July 12, 1931 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-12

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SUNDAX, JULY 12, 1931

Z 8E ITIVZMER MICHIGAN DAILY

PAt' ' ' 3RE

S U D A , J U Y 1 2_1 3 TS U M E I C I A N D A L P G T R

HOOV1ER DENOU NCES
SHORT SELING AS
!HEAT RATE HAR
President Says Speculators Are
Driving Down Prices
of Farmers.
DEMANDS THEY CEASE
Says Limited Number' of Men
Lack Patriotism, Want
Quick Profit.
WASHINGTON, July 11.-(P)-
President Hoover has again recog-
nized the plight of wheat growers,
this time charging speculators sell-
ing short with driving down prices
and depriving farmers of their just
profits.
With wheat at the lowest levels
in thirty years and a heavy move-
ment of the new crop under way,
he called upon them to cease their
activities until the markets have
been revived.
His denunciation Friday was ad-
dressed to a "limited number of
speculators" and was not intended
to refer to legitimate traders.
Asked Clear Definition.
"If these gentlemen," he said,
"have that sense of patriotism
which outruns immediate profit,
and a desire to see the country re-
cover, they will close up these trans-
actions and desist from their man-
i pulations."'
Two weeks ago Mr. Hoover, in
response to widespread demands
that the farm board hold the 200,-
000,000 or more bushels of stabili-
zation wheat off domestic markets
in an effort to bolster prices, sug-
gested to the board that "in view
of the unusual conditions growing
out of the depression" it define its
sales policy more clearly.
Names Withheld.
Vice President Curtis, Senator
Capper of Kansas and Senator
Watson of Indiana, Republicans,
have sought to impress upon the
president the need for relief to
farmers, who have witnessed de-
clining prices for more than a year.
Farm organizations, civic clubs and
individuals have joined them.
Mr. Hoover expressed regret he
could not under the law expose the
names of the short sellers. With-
e rhasis, he added:
"If I could, I would gladly do so.'
The president's statement was in-
dorsed by Carl Williams, farm
board member, who advocated a-
endment of the grain futures act.
Huber Will Address
Open Air Gathering
Dean G. Carl Huber of the Grad-
uate school will speak this evening
at. the first of the open air series
arranged by Ann Arbor churches1
on the lawn of the Presbyterian
church house on Washtenaw ave-
nue. Special musical numbers will
be given by Owen Reed on the cor-
net and a vocal solo by Miss Eliza-
beth Fagg. A feature of the ser-
vice will be the student choir under
the direction of Mr. N. S. Ferris.
The time was originally announc-
ed as 7:30 o'clock, but has been
changed to 7 o'clock.

I Barred by China

I

r )

i

HUGE WHEAT, CORN
CROPS PRlOPHESIED

Society

Iii;

Department of Agriculture Sees
Slight Decrease in
Other Foods.
WASHINGTON, July 11.-(A')-
The nation's corn and wheat bins
will be filled to overflowing next
fall-if the weather holds good.
The agriculture department Fri-
day forecast bumper crop yields of
these crops, but saw a rather mod-
erate production for other farm
products. Drought, heat and slight
acreage reductions are responsible.
The 1931 corn crop was estimated
at 2,976,953,000 bushels as com-
pared with 2,094,000,000 last year
when the drought took heavy toll.
The five-year average is 2,761,000-
000 bushels.
Wheat farmers, already stagger-
ing under the burden of overpro-
duction and low prices, will pro-
duce an estimated crop of 869,013,-
000 bushels. In 1931 the produc-
tion was 863,430,000 bushels.

Miss Inez V. Bozorth, director of
Mosher-Jordan Halls, leaves today
for her summer vacation, which she
will spend at Twin Rocks, Oregon,
after a visit at her home in Ore-
gon. She has planned a motor trip
with her father and sisters through
Oregon and Washington, on which
she will visit Ranier National Park.
Miss Bozorth plans to return to the
dormitory about the middle of Aug-
ust.
* * .
The members of the Society for
the Promotion of Engineer Educa-
tion, who have been occupying Jor-
dan hall for the past three weeks,
left yesterday. Faculty men from
various schools and colleges all over
the country and a few of their
wives have been here. Jordan hall1
was closed last night for the re-
mainder of the summer and it will
open in the fall to accommodate
women students on the campus.

is housing only graduate students
this summer, will entertain the
British and American Conference
on Internation Affairs this evening
at a buffet supper. In the receiv-
ing line will be Mrs Florence W.
Tousey, director of Helen Newberry,
Miss Eunice Van Camp, assistant
director, Miss Roxie Andrews, house
president, and Miss Esther Aldridge,
social chairman of the hall,
There will be about thirty repre-
sentatives from the various leading
universities and colleges of the
British Isles, only nine of which
will be women. Three men and one1
woman will represent Canada while
twenty four will be present from
American colleges and universities.
Eleven of these will be women.
Miss Amy Hemmingway Jones,
representing the Carnegie Endow-
ment for International Peace, will
act as chairman of the conference
and Usula P. Hubbard and Mary
L. Winn will be her assistants.
* * *
Miss Ethel McIntosh has charge
of the second musical hour to be
given at Mosher hall this afternoon.
Entertainment will be furnished by
Miss Prosniak who will play the
violin. She will be accompanied by
Miss Marjorie Kirk.

lip

STATE
£mua'r

Quality
Foods
Amidst
Pleasant
Surround-

Roy Chapman Andrews,
Noted American scientist and ex-
plorer, who has been barred from
conducting his proposed expedition
into the Gobi desert by Chinese of-
ficials for allegedly "excavating
valuable scientific material from
Chinese territory under cover of a
passport for hunting."

lings4

4 4

* * *

gOV NC

ID

By C. H. Beukeina.
Harry Kipke's position as football
coach this year will be not unlike
that of the old woman in the shoe,
particularly when it comes to wing
men. Kipke will be hard put to
find places for Bill Hewitt, Ivan
Williamson, Norman Daniels, Stan
Hozer, Roddy Cox, Russell Damm
and Sylvester Shea, not to mention
Ted Petoskey, Francis Wistert and
others coming up from the fresh-
man teams.
Hewitt it will be remembered,
broke a small bone in his foot
against Michigan State last fall, and
was out for the season. His foot
is as good as ever now, and he nev-
was in better shape to cut down
opposing backs. Daniels, out with
a tackle shoulder, much of last sea-
son after taking the pass and scor-
ing the touchdown against Purdue
that gave Michigan its season's life,
is only in fair condition now. He
suffered several pulled tendons in
his knee in the final Conference
game of the baseball sason and is
still limping.
Williamson is in perfect shape
and ready to renew the brilliant
pace he set last season. He is be-
yond question a real find. Hozer,
sort of a football himself in the
matter of placement, will be on
hand again, and may be shifted to
another position. Started as a full-
back in 1928, he went to guard and
then to end in 1930 and demon-
strated that he had the stuff for
both positions. He has plenty of
weight and may return to guard
this year. Cox, also a fullback early

4
last season, and used at end egainst
Purdue and Ohio State, is in good
shape to renew his quest for a reg-
ular position. He also was the vic-
tim of injuries last year.
IAJESTICI

Among the Best and at
Reasonable Prices

Residents of Mosher hall held a
picnic at the fireplace on the Is-
land last night. Box suppers were
prepared for all of the women and
the cars belonging to students were
used to furnish transportation. .
* * *
Helen Newberry Residence, which

In the Parrot you
will find the res-
t a u r a n t atmos-
phere minimized.
The tables are in
p r i v a t e booths,
the service is al-
w a y s courteous
and the result is a

FREEMAN'S

DINING ROOM

most
meal.

enjoyable

STARTING TODAY

Lunches 40c, Dinners 60c
Sunday Dinner 75c

The

ONLY ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM HILL AUDITORIUM

='i

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P

BIG FEA TURES

RICHARD

BARTH ELM ESS

in

"the

ONE SUMMER DAY
Affords ample time for a delightful 120-mile
round trip cruise on Detroit river and
Lake Erie from Detroit to
PUT-IN-BAY ISLAND PARK
Scene of the Battle of Lake Erie. Golf, bathing, boating,
fishing, picnic in the grove or dine at the fine hotels. Perry
Victory monument and wonderful caves.
75c FOR THE ROUND TRIP. CHILDREN 40c
WEEKDAYS. $1.25 and 65c SUNDAYS.
Return same day
Str. Put-In-Bay leaves foot of First St., Detroit, daily, 9 a.m. Home at 8
p.m., except Fri.,10:15 p.m., for Put-In-Bay, Cedar Point and Sandusky,0.
_Q7 A BARGAIN TWO-DAY OUTING $7
'II' The Crescent Hotel Company and Ashley & Dustin
SteamerLine have joined to offerthe extremelylow rate of $7 fora two-day
outing atPut-In-Bay. Leave Detroit any dayat9a.m.,arrive 12 noon.Lunch
at Crescent Hotel, also evening dinner and room; breakfast and dinner
the next day. Round trip on steamer and dinner on the boat returning.
CEDAR POINT
The Lido of America. Special excursions every Friday with over three
hours at the Point, $1.50 round trip; other days one hour stopover, fare
$1.75 round trip, Cedar Point or Sandusky. Return same day.
DANCING MOONLIGHTS
Leave Detroit 8:45 p.m. Wednesday -Thursday, 60c.
Home 11:30 p.m. Saturday, Sunday, 75c.
Finzel's Snappy Band.

A

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Finger
Points"

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AND

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CARTTER'S

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f ev ra
LU NC
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LUNCH

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Schmelling

VS.

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Stribling

We have all makes
Remington, Royal,
Corona, Underwood
Colored duco finishes.

Price $60

World's Heavyweight Boxing
Championship.
Official pictures of entire match
taken at ringside in Cleveland.

SOUTH
STATE
STREET

ASHLEY & DUSTIN STEAMER LINE
Foot of First Street Detroit, Michigan

O. D. MORRILL
14 South State St. Phone 6615

OPEN UNTIL 11 P.M._I

I. '____

I' a

A limited number of copies
still available

are

C

Campus Sale Continues Monday Only

THE SUMMER

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