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July 12, 1931 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-12

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THE SU1ViMEIt MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNRAY, JULY 12, 1932

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. JULY 12. 1931

Daily Official Bulletin
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members
of the University. Copy received at the office of the Dean of the
Summer Session until 3:30, excepting Sundays. 11:30 a.m. Saturday.
VOLUME XI SUNDAY, JULY 12, 1931 NUMBER 12
-
Excursion No. 4-Second Trip to Ford Plant: This trip will be made.
Wednesday, July 15, for students who we.e unable to go July 8. The
party leaves at 1 p. m. from the front of Angell Hall and ends at 5:45
p. m., Ann Arbor. The round trip to the plant and return is by motorbus.
Reservations may be made in the Summer Session office, room 9,
University Hall, up to 5 p. m., Tuesday, July 14.
Observatory Nights: Tickets for Visitors' Nights at the Observatory,
July 20, 21, 22, may be obtained in the office of the Summer Session
from 9 to 12 a. m. and 2 to 5 p. m., beginnnig Monday, July 13. These
tickets are intended for students of the Summer Session who will present
their Treasurer's receipts when applying for them. Students desiring
to avail themselves of this opportunity to visit the Observato . y shoulQ
apply for tickets at once for the supply is very limited.
Edward H. Kraus
Faculty Concert Series: The second concert in the summer series
to be given by members of the School of Music faculty will be presented
by the School of Music Trio, Wassily Besekirsky, violinist; Hanns Pick,
violoncellist; Joseph Brinkman, pianist. The concert will be given
at Hill Auditorium at 8:15 o'clock, Tuesday evening, July 14, to which
the general public is cordially invited without admission charge. The
program follows: Saint-Saens, Trio, F Major-Allegro Vivace-Andante
-Scherzo-Allegro; Tcherepnine, trio, Op. 34-Moderato-Allegro-Al-
Legretto-Allegro Molto; Schumann, Trio, Op. 63, D Minor-Mit Energie
und Leidenschaft-Lebhaft-Langsam-Mit Feuer.
Charles A. Sink
The Women's Education Club will meet in the Women's League
Building on Monday evening, July 13, from 7:15 to 8:30 o'clock. Miss
i;thel McCormick, Acting Dean of Women, will bring greeting to the
club and will describe summer campus activities for women at Michigan.
Dean Edmonson of the School of Education will address the club. Mr.
Charles B. Ruegnitz of the School of Music will give a group of vocal
elections. All women interested in education are cordially invited.
The Men's Educational Club will meet Monday at the Michigan
Union from 7 to 8 p. m. Dr. J. K. Pollock will discuss "The Present
Political Situation in Europe."
Afternoon Conference on Education: At the Conference to be hela
Monday, July 13, at 4 p. m., in the University High School Auditorium,
Professor C. L. Clark will discuss "Some Problems of Adult Education
in a Metropolitan College." All who are interested in Education are
urged to attend.

REED HITS EPOCH'
OF INDIFFERENCEj
Noted Political Scientist Scores
Communism, Fascism.
(Continued From Page One)
obligation, in large degree because
of lackadaisical educational stand-
ards. We have made it too easy to
get an education, and our young
people grow up to think sloppily
and sentimentally instead of clear-
ly and rigorously on public ques-
tions.
"In particular," he said, "we must
realize that it is necessary deliber-
ately to train through the public
echools our future citizens. This
training now is sadly neglected. We
have attempted to load upon the
so-called 'civics' course the social-
izing responsibilities that ought to
be a part of the whole curriculum.
The result has been to eliminate
from it almost altogether the sub-
jects of government and politics.
'Civics' is ordinarily taught by
teachers who, whatever other t.ain-
ing they have in the social sciences,

have almost none in political sci-
ence; and it is all too frequently in-
trusted to teachers of music or gym-
nastics on the theory that anybody
can teach citizenship.
"Educators say," he went on,
"that the curriculum is too crowd-
ed - that citizenship training is
merely one of a number of sub-
jects clamoring for admission. I
believe that training for citizenship
is in a democracy the most funda-
mental work of the schools, and
that the curriculum framers should
begin with the subjects fundamen-
tal to intelligeni citizenship and
then devote the rest of the avail-
able time to other things.
"Democracy is worth saving," he
declared, "because it is the only
f-tm of government now available
wihich makes possible an orderly
succession of rulers, the only sys-
tem in which policies can be work-
ed out by evolution rather than by
revolution. We can't save it by
mumbling a ritual of hundred-per-
cent Americanism. It can only be
saved by training the citizens of to-
morrow-and that is the teache:'s
job."

( DYE RTISIN j
BOARD-First class, by the week,
$5.50 for 3 meals per day; $4.75
for two meals. Slightly higher
rates by the single meal. One
half block from the Campus at
213 South Thayer. Phone 5156.
WANTED -- Student laundry. All
work guaranteed. Reasonable
prices. Socks darned and buttons
replaced free. Will call for and
deliver. Call 23365.
7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
FOR RENT-Cool, attractive room

for men. Shower bath. Dial 8544.
422 East Washington.
8, 9,10,11,12
GARAGE FOR RENT-1302 Wash-
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Afternoon or evenings. 12
LOST-Mottled black Wahl-Ever-
sharp pencil. Finder please call
3530. Reward. 10, 11, 12
TYPEWRITING
and
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A speciality for twenty
years.
Prompt service . . . Experienced oper-
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0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. .Phone 6615

Dine and Dance

S
;'

i
_______ 1

British and American Students Conference on International Affairs:
Members of the Summer Session are cordially invited to attend th2 open
meetings of the British and American Students Conference on Inter-
national Affairs, which is being held at the University of Mir:igan
_ ague, by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Tne
meetings will be held, in the Grand Rapids Room of the League, at
8:00 p. m.
Monday, July 13-Presiding Officer, Professor Clyde Eagleton, of
of New York University. Speakers-Alexander Ross, of Edin-
burgh, Advocate and Barrister-at-Law, "Suum Cuique," and
Jesse S. Reeves, Ph.D., L.H.D., Professor of International Lay.
in the University of Michigan, "The Outer Sign and the Inner
Grace."

FOR SUNDA Y
CHICKEN DINNER
Try our
75c and $1.00
Seven Course
Specials
Dinner Dancing
6:30-8:00

f

Tuesday, July 14-Presiding Officer, Professor Norman A. MacKen-
zie, University of Toronto. Speakers-William Arnold-Forster,
Artist and Writer, formerly secretary to Viscount Cecil of Chel-
wood, "Concrete Proposals for the Disarmament Treaty." Pro-
fessor Pitman B. Potter, University of Wisconsin, "The Pan-
American Union."
Fiiday, July 17-Presiding Officer, Professor A. G. Ronhovde. Speak-
ers-C. R. M. F. Cruttwell, Principal of Hertford College and
lecturer in Modern History, University of Oxford, "British For-
eign Policy." Albert C. Jacobs, A.M., B.C.L., Associate Professo.
of Law, Columbia University, Member of Summer Session Fac-
ulty, University of Michigan.
- - -

Evening Dancing
9:00-12:00

Nick Ma gas, Manager t

Phi Delta Kappa: The regular weekly luncheon will
Michigan Union, Tuesday, July 14, from 12 to 1 o'clock.
will be Vice President Yoakum. All members of other
especially invited.

be held at the
The speaker
chapters are

Unitarian
afternoon.

Student Outing:
Meet at church

This
at 4

L. O. Andrews, President of Omega Chapter

Public Health Nurses: A tea will be held for Public Health Nurses
enrolled in the University Summer Session this afternoon from 4 to
5:30 at 1700 Fenwood Drive, corner of Granger and Ferdon.
Meeting of Southerners: All students and faculty from the South
are cordially invited to meet at the Michigan League Building at 7:1v
on Wednesday evening, July 15, for the purpose of becoming better
acquainted. The meeting will dismiss promptly at eight. The room
number will be posted on the bulletin board in the lobby of the League
Building.
Michigan High School Debating League: There will be a meeting
in Room 4203 Angell Hall, Tuesday, July 14th, at 7:30 p. m., for the
purpose of phrasing the high school debate question for next year.
All high school debate coaches on the campus and others interested
are urged to be present.
J. H. McBurney, League Manager
Wesleyan Guild: This Sunday evening devotional meeting at E
o'clock at Wesley Hall. Students from Taylor and Asbury Colleges will
have charge of the program. You are cordially invited to be present
Refreshments will be served.
Baptist Guild: Meets 12 to 12:40 Sunday noon, west transept of
church auditorium. Dr. Ora S. Duffendack of the Physics Department
of the University will speak on "The Faith of a Physicist."

o'clock.
Outdoor Service: There will be an
outdoor service of Ann Arbor
churches at 7 o'clock Sunday eve-
ning on the lawn of the Presby-
terian Church house, Washtenaw
avenue. The speaker will be Dean
G. Carl Huber, his topic being,
"Thoughts on Religion."
BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Street
Broiled Spring Chick-
en Dinners
12:00 -2:00
5:30-8:00
50c
Today

THIS WEEK
Michigan Repertory Players
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BOOK BARGAINS soc
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Heywood Brouws in the N. Y. T'ribune.
"A most bizarre and brilliant cameo, a true adornment to the American stage .
N. Y. Herald.
Single Admissions 75c
For Reservations Phone 6300
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