100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 12, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAG E 'iTW

THE SUMMER MIC IIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JULY 12, 1931

PAGE TWO THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, JULY 12, 1931

fir 'immer '
- a i i t
S Published every morning except Monday
during the University Summer Session by the
Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-"
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches herein are alsoreserved.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post"
office as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.50; by mail,
$1.75.
Offi e: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Telephones: Editorial, 4925; Business
2-1214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
HAROLD O. WARREN, JR.
Editorial Director ...........Gurney Williams
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
C. W. Carpenter Carl Meloy
L, R. C h t) Slher M. Quraishi
Barbara HallF leanor Rairdon
Charles C. Irwin Edgar Racine
Susan Manchester utMarion sthornton
P'. Cutler Showers
BUSINESS STAFF
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R. WORBOYS
assistant Business Manager . . Vernon Bishop
Contracts Manager.............Carl Marty
Assistants
,,,: I JULY9alph Hardy
U ±v:1tiY, JUtLY 12, 1931

What Others Say
WHY FRANCE
HESITA TED
(New York Herald Tribune)

WHAT'S GOING ON
JULY 12 to JULY 19
TODAY
Genexral

MA LICIOUS SHYLOCK
The latest prime example of ad-
ult stupidity is the action taken by
a Syracuse interdenominational
group in petitioning the Board of
Education of that city to remove
"The Merchant of Venice" from
school reading lists, "because Shy-
lo'^k presents an unfair and malic-
ious concept of the Jews."
While Shylock would undoubted-
ly plead guilty to the charge of be-
ing a malicious Jew, and hile an
unguided young student might pos-
sibly form unfair racial conclusions
from a reading of "The Merchant
of Venice," it is nevertheless ut-
terly absurd in this day of so-called
enl.ghtenment that one of the
world's greatest literary ma ster-
pieces should be banned on the
grounds of being racially objection-
able. To shield the adoles';ent mind
from cheap and salacious contern-
porary literature is one thing but
i': brand a dramatic gern as har'i;-
rf l because a fiction character pre-
sents a "malicious concepc' of a
ce.s tn race is ridiculously short-
signted.
We should like to ask the "Good-
will" committee of Syracuse if a
cross-eyed Frenchman should be
put away lest he distort the young
mind into believing that the French
are all cock-eyed; if a stuttering
Englishman should be decapitated
so that his defect will not present
an evil concept of the British; or
if the existence of the American
gangsters should be denied in or-
der to prevent misconceptions of
typical Americans. We should also
like to ask why the commit gee has
overlooked Iago, an Italian who is
one of fiction's greatest villains;
and why Aaron does not present
an evil concept of the Moors. Both
are in Shakespeare; both could be
as thoroughly misinterpreted as
Shylock is sometimes misinterpret-
ed.

Although it is plain that the mor-
atorium on the war debt is "good
business" for France, as it is for
the United States and the rest of
the world, there is nevertheless rea-
son to be appreciative of the cour-
teous tone and obviously willing
attitude of the French statesmen
during the recent negotiations. For
the United States the advantages
of the moratorium were so very,
clear that no American hesitated
very long before aproving it. In
our case the proposal was a strict-
ly economic measure which the
President, with a foresight which
will command admiration in in-
.reasing measure, refused to en-
tangle with political considera_-
dions.
When France was first confronted
with the proposal, however, it was
very natural that the first thoughts
which came to mind were of a po-
_itical nature, dating much farther
oack than the beginning of the
current depression. Not without
reason do the French fear their
neighbors to the north. Nor can
one be surprised that there are
Frenchmen who are by no means
anxious to see a strong Germany.
It is therefore easy to see that
the French government owed it to
the French people to be at least
very careful in approving the Hoo-
ver proposal. Although the world
now knows that most Frenchmen
desire a healthy Germany, there
were undoubtedly sections of opin-
un which would have witnessed a
German chaos without shedding too
many tears. The French govern-
menu had to take such opinion in-
co account. It had, however, to con-
sider whether it could afford to
regard the President's proposal as
an isolated economic measure, or
whether it had to use it as a de-
vice for the achievement of fur-
ther political concessions from the
Reich.
The President desired the mora-
torium to go into effect without po-
litical entanglements, and to this
the French have yielded. Much as
this commands the admiration of
Americans for Mr. Hoover, it must
also arouse satisfaction at the co-
operation of the French. - There
were times during the recent nego-
tiations when the temptation to re-
criminate and impugn motives was
strong. With a few exceptions the
tone of American comment on the
French position has been free from
those adjectives which so effect-
ively poison public opinion. Now
that the desired end has been so
happily achieved, it is well to real-
ize that in diplomacy the effort to
understand is always more produc-
tive than the instinct to pass moral
judgments.
- _
THE HITCH-HIKER
AGAiN

4 o'chek-Tea for public health'
nurses. 1700 Fenwood drive.
7 o'clock--Outdoor service of
Ann Arbor ch urches. Lawn ofF
Presbyterian church house.
The Theatres
Majestic -- Richard Barthelmess
in "The Finger Points."
Michigan-Norma Shearer in "A
Free Soul."
Wuerth - Lew Ayr in "Iron
Man."
MONDAY
General
4 o'clock-Lecture. "Pollen Statis-
tics and Forest History." Dr. O.
Gunnar Erdtmann. Room 2054.
Natural Science building.
4 o'clock-Education conference.
"Some Problems of Adult Education
in a Metropolitan College." Prof.
Clarence L. -Clark. University High
school auditorium.
5 o'clock-Lecture. "Some Experi-
ments Illustrating Radio Phenom-
ena." Prof. Neil H. Williams. West
lecture room, west Physics build-
ing.
7 o'clock-Men's Education meet-
ing. "The Present Political Situa-
tion in Europe." Prof. James K.
Pollock. The Union.
7:15 o'clock-Women's Education
club meeting. The League.
8 o'clock-Open meeting, British
and American Students Conference
on International Affairs. Grand
Rapids room, the League.
The Theatres
Majestic-"The Finger Points.
Michigan-"A Free Soul."
Wuerth--"Iron Men."
TUESDAY
General
12 o'clock-Phi Delta Kappa
meeting. The Union.
4 o'clock-Education conference.
"The Individualization of Instruc-
tion." Dr. Paul T. Rankin. Uni-
versity high school auditorium.
5 o'clock-Lecture. "Present Opin-
ion of the Cause of Cancer." Prof.
Carl V, Weller. Natural Science
auditorium.
7:30 o'clock -- Michigan High
School Debating league meeting.
Room. 4203, Angell hall.
8 o'clock-School of Music con--
cert. Hill auditorium.
8 o'clock-Open meeting. British
and American Students conference.
Grand Rapids room, the League.
The Theatres
Majestic-"The Finger Points."
Michigan-"A Free Soul."
Wuerth-"Iron Men."
WEDNESDAY
General
1 o'clock-Fourth Summer :es-
sion excursion leaves. In front of
Angell hall.
4 o'clock-Educational conference.
Outstanding Problems for and
About Business." Prof. J. O. Malott.
University High school auditorium.
5 o'clock-Lecture. "Iceland Yes-
terday and Today." Prof. Fred-
erick W. Peterson. Natural Science
auditorium.
7:15 o'clock-Meeting of south-
erners. The League.
The Theatres
Lydia Mendelssohn - "Liliom."
The Repertory players.
Majestic - "Divorce A m on g
Friends."
Michigan-"A Free Soul."
Wuerth--"Iron Men."
THURSDAY

NORNJA
SHE A RE R
in
"A
with
Leslie Howard
James Gleason
Lionel Barrymore
Clark Cable
Froms he book by.
Adela Rogers St. Johns

HALLER'S
JEWELERS

STATE
WATCH REPAIRING

STREET AT LIBERTY

FINE JEWELRY I

GRUEN WATCHES

TAK EA RIDE ON

--
r~~~~u . rI' -mrrrnrL"'re r3..iA ,
" r ,

TO
PORT
URON

iP - s 'ink ti« _

II

COME 'TO DETROIT
any day this Summer, park your car on the dock, and enjoy this all-day
sail over the great Infernational I-ghway of Lakes and Rivers. Free
Dancing on the boat. Splendid Cjeteria and I unch Service. See Detroit
river front, Belle Isle, Lake St. Clair, the Flats and the celebrated "Venice
of America." This cruise of 61 miles each way takes you through a con-
stantly changing panorama of rare land and water views.
Port Huron, Sarna, St. Clair Flats, Algonac
Starting this trip from Port Huror passengers leave at 3:10 p. m., arriving
in Detroit at 7:45 p. m. Returning, leave Detroit at 9 the next morning,
arriving in Port Huron at 2:10 p. m.
Str. Tashmoo leaves Griswold St. Dock at 9 a. m., Daily and Sunday; arrive
Port Huron 2:10 p. rr Returning, leave PORT HUaON, 3:10 p. m., arnve
Detroit 7:45 p. tP2 . FilES: Tashmnoo Park or St. Clair Flats, week days 75c;
Sundays, $1.00, I. T. Port Huron or Sarnia, Ont., one way, $1.10, R.T. 2.
TAS HMOO PARK
half-way betwtan Detroit and Port Huron is Detroit's favorite pleasure park
where you may spend six hours and return on Str. Tashmoo in the
evening. Free dancing in the pavilion; picnic in the grove, baseball, golf
and all outdoor sports and amusements.
reod ng G. T. Ry., etwe''n Detroit and Port
Railroad Tickets Huron,ares od onSt;. Tchmoo itherdirection
Dancing Mooniights to Sugar Island
Drive to Detroit and enjoy an evening of music and dancing on Str.
Tashmoo and in the pavilion at Sugar ? :and. Tickets 75c. Park on the
dock. Leave at 8:45 every evening.
RANDOLPH POPULAR STR. TASH MOO Foot c GrIswold St.
953 DETROIT, MICH.

DIAMONDS

"Medium
Irons

Monday Night Owl feature
"MIN and BILL"
Marie Dressler
Wallace Beery

~1

1)

r. /
_ .
,
,
t i'11' iI I I? ' tF } - Y t ijJ1 '' - (jlft 1 f 3 it ,
.r u
' - -

j

i

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCh
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"PERSONS THAT MAKE ERAS"
Dr. Fisher
12:00 N.-Sunday School Class at
Wesley Hall. Leader: Mr. Ralph
R. Johnson.
6:00 P. M.-Devotional Meeting.
Wesley Hall. Students from As-
bury and Taylor Colleges will
speak.

- .- ^+ {

ii

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CIURCh
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry 'Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan B. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.--Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.-Brotherhood of St.
Andrew's Bible class, leader Har-
ley Kline.
11:00 A. M.-Summer Kindergarten.
Miss Eunice Campbell.
11:00 A. M.-Morning Prayer. Ser-
mon by the Rev. A. J. Wilder of
the clergy staff of the Washington
Cathedral.

Not long ago we expressed our
opinion of history debunkers who
dwell at lengthupon the evil char-
acteristics of our national heroes
to the detriment of their good qual-
ities, and we shall defend that
opinion to the last ditch; but for
censors who complain that certain
immortal characters in dramatic
fiction are no longer fit to be
known, we have the utmost con-
tempt.
If the Board of Education in
Syracuse is wise it will thank the
"Goodwill" committee for its un-
conscious hittt that something is
radically wrong with the Syracuse
system of teaching Shakespeare. If
teachers have not the ability or in-
clination to straighten out posisble
"malicious concepts" arising in the
student's mind from a study of lit-
erary gems, then some action
should be taken to bar the teachers,
not the books.
PROSPERITY NOTE
Better than all the optimistic in-
terviews on "rosy business skies,"
statements about "the dawn of a
new era," and opinions advanced
by Tom, Dick and Harry on the
everlasting question of depression,
is the report of the Treasury de-
partment, issued yesterday. From
it we find that the per capita cir-
culation of money in the United
States increased ninety cents last
month and $1.81 during the fiscal
year. Here is concrete evidence
that the public is buying more,
hoa.rding .less; and here we are
given a glimpse of a national norm
by which we can judge conditions.

S
M
1
d
J
x

(Daily Illini)
What is to be done about the
hitch hiker? This question is again.
before the public eye, now that the
state of Connecticut has put into
effect a law which provides penal-
ties for people who stand by the
roadside and beg rides of passing
motorists.
The hitch hiker problem is one
which directly concerns many col-
lege men, and there are some, nog
doubt, who find in this practice one
of the principal means of getting to
and from their homes at vacation
periods-but, beyond question, the
hitch hiker is a grade-A nuisance,
He toils not, neither does he spin;
and yet he rides from one end of
the country to the other on some-
body else's gasoline and oil and
tires- and now, and then he turns
out to be an actual highway rob-
ber to boot, which many a motor-
ist has learned at his cost.
Obviously, anything that will
abate this nuisance will be welcome
to most motorists. And right here
in the Middle West, students who
are habitual hitch hikers can testi-
fy that rides are no longer as plen-
tiful nor as easily obtained as was
formerly the case. College students,
or persons like college students, are
about the only ones left that the
average motorist is willing to trust.
And then often the pennant-be-
decked Gladstone--emblem of the
college hiker-is merely a sham,
and the motorist is literally "taken
for a ride" in his own machine.
Yes, hitch hiking has its evils.
And yet-it seems too bad to leg-
islate against it. After all, there
is something democratic about the
practice. The fact that it can and
does flourish to such an extent. in
America indicates that Americans,
after all, are still fairly open-heart-

Tuesday afternoon open house
Harris Hall from four to six.

at

}!

- General
5 o'clock-Lecture. "Distribution
of the Indian Population before the
White Contact." Dr. W. B. Hins-
dale. Natural Science: auditorium.
The Theatres
Lydia Mendelssohn-"Liliom."
Majestic - "Divorce Among
Friends."
Michigan-William. Haines in "A
Tailor-Made Man."
Wuerth-"Rango."
FRIDAY
General
9 o'clock-Public Health confer-
ence opens. West Medical build-
ing.
8 o'clock-Social evening, aus-
pices education clubs. University
High school gymnasium. Admis-
sion, 25 cents.
8 o'clock-Open meeting. Brit-
ish and American Students confer-
ence. Grand Rapids room, the Lea-
gue.
Theatres
Lydia Mendelssohn-"Liliom."
Majestic -"Divorce Among
Friends."
Michigan-"A Tailor-Made Mar
Wuerth-"Rango."
SATURDAY
General
8 o'clock-(morning)-Fifth Sum-
mer excursion leaves. In front of
Angell hall.
Theatres
Lydia Mendelssohn-"Lilio m."
Majestic-"Annabelle's Affairs."

FlRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
Sunday, July 12, 1931
10:45 A. M.-Service of worship'
with sermon by Mr. Heaps. Third
address in the series on "Four
Gospels for Today." Subject, "The
Gospel of Social Justice" with par-
ticular reference to the teachings
of Walter Rauschenbusch.
Soloist, Thelma Lewis.
Organist, Prof. Earl V. Moore.

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning Serv-
ice. Sermon topic: "Sacrament."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
9:30 A. M.-Church School, Sum-
mer Session.
10:45 A.aM.-Hear Dr. Anderson
on "Walls and Windows."
6:00 P. M.-Young People's Social
Hour and Supper at Student Cen-
ter, 1432 Washtenaw Avenue.
7:00 P. M.-Union Out-door Serv-
ice for all summer students and
other young people in the grove
at Student Center, 143 2 Wash-
tenaw Avenue. Dean G. Carl
Huber will give the address. Stu-
dent Choir of St. Andrew's Church
will lead the music.
THE
FIRST BAPTIST §HURC>I
E. Huron, below State
R. EdwardSayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister of
Students.
9:30 A. M.-The Church School.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Mr. Sayles will preach on
"FAITH AND DISCOVERY"
12 Noon-Dr. O. S. Duffendack of
the physics dept. of the University
will speak on "The Faith of a
Physicist."
7:00 P. M.-Union student gather-
ing at Presbyterian Church House
1432 Washtenaw. Dean G. Carl
Huber, speaker.
Welcome to all.

II

7:30 P. M.-Wednesday
restimonial meeting.

Evening

The Reading Room, 10 and 11
State Savings Bank Building, is open
daily from 12 to 5 o'clock, except
Sundays and legal holidays.
ii

I'

Outdoor Union Church

Service

Tonight

at Seven o'clock

Professor Carl G. Huber, dean of the Graduate School
will speak on
"TH O UGHTS ON RELIGION"
at the
Presbyterian Church House on Washtenaw
Next Sunday, Professor Edw. R. Adair will speak on
"Religion and Reality."

C. 'L , ~ k. ~~f~jj a-b 1 vri vy~ Ui~ 1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan