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July 04, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE SUMMER MIGHiGAN DAILY

SATURDAY', JULY 4, 193 i

_

Urrat
'ubiished every morning except Monday
ring the University Summer Session by the
ard in Control of Student. Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
the use for republication of all news dis-
tcles credited to it or not otherwise credited
this paper and the local news published
>rein. All rightis of_ republication of special
rpatches herein are also reserved.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, posth
ice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.50; by mail,
l.7 b.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
an Arbor, Mhgan.
Telephones: Edlterial, 4925; Business
1214.

EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAG ING EDITOR
HAROLD 0.WARREN, JR.
torial Director ...........Gurney Williams
. Editor,... .....PowersMoulton
re Editor...........Denton Kunze
ic, Drama, Books ... Williamn . orman
me's Editor .......... Eleanor Rairdon
rts Editor ........ .. 0. H. Beukemna
egraph Editor . .+.. . ..........AL. R. hubb
Night Editors

professors' recommendation. Unless
they can really prove that Profes-
sor Miller has done something re-
prehensible, their university is cer-
tain to lose the respect of all think-
ing people. They should realize
that they can only make a laughing
stock of the institution by trying
to mix prejudice or commercial in-
terest with education.
Independence Day means punch-
ing the alarm clock instead of the
time clock.
The popularity of hot dogs in
Chile is explained by the fact that
beer is available at all the stands.
Seaweed is cultivated in Japan
for food, and is also found in Ann
Arbor restaurant salads.
WHAT'S GOING ON
JULY 4 TO JULY 11
TODAY
The Theatres
Lydia Mendelssohn - "Paris
Bound." The Repertory players.
Majestic-Gloria Swanson in "In-
discreet."
Michigan-"Men Call It Love"
with Adolphe Menjou, Leila Hyams,
and Nor man Foster.
Wuerth-"The Sin Ship" with
Louis Wolheim and Mary Astor.
SUNDAY
The Theatres .
Majestic-"Indiscreet."

Denton Ruus

n Bunting
an R. Can
w. C3arpent
ar Eckert
bara Hall
;Ax Hornilk

Powers Moulton
Gurney Williams
Assistantse .
viarles C. Irwin
rm Susan Manchester
tr Carl Melny
Sher M. Quraishi
Edgar Racine
Theodore Rose
P. Cutler Showers

BUSINESS STAFF
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R. WORBOYS
seistant Business Manager .. Vernon Bishop
irculation Bt Accounts Manager .. Ann 'Verner
ontraets Manager ............Cari Marty
dvertising Manager.... ....Beach Conger
Assistants

Corbett Franklin!
Don: Lyon

Ralph Hardy

SATURDAY, JULY 4, 1931
Night Editor-GURNEY WILLIAMS
Laxity
I F an ounce of prevention is worth
a pound of cure, some definite
sL;zps siaould be taken by the police
department to lessen the great
number of local traffic violations.
Specifically, the corner of North
University Avenue and State Street
needs attention, and perhaps some
traffic light equipment.
A check-up yesterday by The Dai-
ly yields the fact that an over-
whelming majority of motorists,
traveling west on North University
Avenue, do nog come to a full stop
at the intersection of State Street,
in spite of the familiar Stop sign
placed at that point; that practi-
cally every motorist traveling in
that direction, and those traveling
south on State Street, do not make
left turns in a manner calculated
to maintain a standard of safety
in this vicinity.
On the whole the local police de-
partment is as an alert and efficient
group of men as could be desired
for the protection of a city the size
of Ann Arbor, but laxity in rigid
enforcement of all possible traffic
rules is here noticeable. Time and
time again officers stationed at the
point under discussion have been
seen to cast merely indifferent
glances at motorists who slow down
but do not stop at the intersection.
In addition to more careful scru-
tiny of careless motorists by police
officers, some sort of blinker light
should be set up- at the end of
North University to prevent motor-
ists from making sweeping left
turns. It can be pointed out that
no serious accidents have occurred
at this point for a number of years
but this, it must be said, is a mat-
ter of luck, and does not assume
future safety at one of Ann Ar-
bor's..busiest intersections.

Michigan-"The Public

Enemy"

with James Cagney and Jean Har-
low.
Wuerth-Jack Holt in "The Sub-
way Express."
MONDAY

General
Educational Conference -
Difference in Intelligence

"Sex
and

Achievement." Warren R. Good. 4
o'clock. University High School
auditorium.
Lecture-"Life in Roman Britain."
Illustrated. Prof. James E. Dunlap.
4 o'clock. Natural Science auditori-
um.
The Theatres
Majestic-"Indiscreet."
Michigan-"The Public Enemy."
Wuerth-"The Subway Express."
TUESDAY
General
Assembly-Students and faculty,
School of Education. 4 o'clock. Un-
iversity High school auditorium.
Lecture-"Some Iconoclastic Con-
troversies in American History."
Prof. Thomas M. Marshall. 5 o'-
clock. Natural Science auditorium.
Concert-Prof. Palmer Christian.
8 o'clock. Hill auditorium.
The Theatres
Majestic-"Indiscreet."
Michigan-"The Public Enemy."
Wuerth-"The Subway Express."
WEDNESDAY
General
Excursion-Ford Plant. Starts at
1 o'clock in front of the Library.
Lecture- "The Changing Thea-
tre." Thomas Wood Stevens. 3 o'-
clock. Lydia Mendelssohn theatre.
Attendance limited.
Educational Conference - "The
Problem of Educating the Crippled
Child." Prof. Louis W. Keeler. 4
o'clock. University High school au-
ditorium.
Lecture-"An International Scen-
ic Highway." Illustrated. Prof.
Harlow ©. Whittemore. 5 o'clock.
Natural Science auditorium.
The Theatres
Lydia Mendelssohn - Moliere's
"Don Juan." The Michigan Reper-
tory players.
Majestic-William Powell in "La-
dies' Man."
Michigan-"The Public Enemy."
Wuerth-"The Subway Express."
THURSDAY
General
Lecture-"Dramatic Qualities in
Orchestral Music." Prof. Earl V.
Moore. 5 o'clock. Natural Science
auditorium.
The Theatres
Lydia Mendelssohn-"Don Juan."
Majetsic-"Ladies' Man."
Michigan-Marion Davies in "It's
a Wise Child."
Wuerth-"Sailor, Behave," with
Olsen and Johnson.
FRIDAY
General
Informal Reception - Students,
faculty on Summer Session. 8:30
o'clock at night.
Excursion-Niagara Falls and vi-
cinity. Starts at 10:43 o'clock at
night. Michigan Central Railroad
station.
The Theatres
Lydia Mendelssohn-"Don Juan."
Matinee, 3 o'clock.
Majestic-"Ladies' Man."
Mlchigan-"It's a Wise Child."
Wuerth-"Sailor, Behave."
SATURDAY
The Theatres
Lydia Mendelssohn-"Don Juan."
Majestic-Richard Barthelmess in
"The Finger Points."

Music & Drama
PARIS BOUND
A Review
With Thursday morning's review
this reviewer is in essential egree-
ment. "Paris Bound" is a good
comedy, arguing with suavity and
good humour that in the structure
of life by two people in love with
each other and married to each
other there are larger values than
absolute physical honesty. The
present production is a good-hu-
moured, competent one; and the
evening gay and entertaining.
The distinctly good things in the
production are the excellent per-
formances of Harry Allen, of Helen
Carrm (who gave real depth to a
small part with the fine slow, reti-
cent, deliberate delivery character-
istic of a "despair" drunk) and of
Mildred Todd (whose only flaw as
a comedienne is that she thinks,
perhaps rightly, that she has to
punch a part to get it across).
But the production seems to me
to contain one flaw worth extended
examination. For, as I see it, the
numerous moments in the evening
which don't have nearly the force
they should have derive from this
one flaw. Stating this flaw in its
simplest terms, I refer to the girl-
ishness of Miss Chapel in her in-
terpretation of Mary Hutton. What
I mean by girlishness can be best
appreciated when one stops to
think if, by her manner on the
stage (that is, her way of trans-
lating into physical terms Mary's
emotions), Miss Chapel in any way
substantiated what Barry probably
meant to be the most revealing line
in the play about Mary (Noel's
line: "Mary, you have the wisest
eyes I have ever seen"). Miss Chap-
el's Mary Hutton never holds con-
viction as a thinker, as a wise young
woman. In fact, when asked by
Nora where she got her ideas, she
says, "some by myself" in such a
girlish way as to cancel any con-
viction that it was a struggle get-
ting them, that she took them ser-
iously, that she had any intention
of using them to control her life.
One of the principal consequences
of this-besides the fact that it re-
duces the importance of Mary Hut-
ton as a character-is that it spoils
the excitement and the significance
of the drama's action after Mary's
discovery of her husband's infidel-
ity. Barry's point there is that for
a dangerous six weeks (which near-
ly resulted in tragedy) Mary Hut-
ton, in spite of her hard-won in-
sight into the values of the mar-
riage relationship, easily becomes
the prey of feminine instincts and
is about to make a typical, silly and
vainfeminine decision. The "in
spite of" clause in that is what
yields drama; otherwise Mary's
feelings are commonplace feminine
feelings. Miss Chapel was so un-
vain feminine decision. The "in
spite of" clause, that there was no
surprise when her Mary Hutton be-
came feminine and vain and silly.
We didn't share, as we were meant
to, Mr. Hutton's pain and surprise
and indignation in the last act
when he finds Mary acting like his
wife had acted years ago. The
whole force of Barry's crisis-that
it is tremendously difficult even for
an intelligent woman to think her-

self away from feminine instincts
which have been fortified by the
cant of years about marriage-was
lost. And hence Barry's comic res-
olution-with Mary vaguely feeling
from her very slight but lovely af-
fair with the composer how lit-
tle such things touch the marriage
structure and having this feeling
confirmed by Jim's unthinkable
generosity and tenderness in re-
fusing to hear what he thinks to,
be the story of her infidelity-was
not nearly as beautiful and as de-
cisive as it should be.
It is very possible that Miss Chap-
el cannot transcend her age or her.
girlish mannerisms. But it is more
probable that she was more or less
indulged in them by Mr. Windt. For:
in the past Mr. Windt has been un-3
successful in helping students out
of the mannerisms of their per-
sonalities and unsuccessful in real-
izing that people who are gay,
graceful, witty, capable of long
spurts of charming nonsense (the
creations of comic dramatists) not
only can be but in all probability
are very serious, very balanced,
very dignified. At least, Mr. Windt
has seldom been able to stimulate
students to a projection of the basic
maturity which gives the humour
of comic creations its significance.
His failure in this respect with Miss
Chapel-who is one of the best

N
R
0
E
A
T

-. - .=k,
"
LUNCH

1

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH

Cor. S. State and B. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"MINDS THAT MAKE
GREATNESS"
Dr. Fisher
12:00 N.-Sunday School Class at
Wesley Hall. Leader: Mr. Ralph
R. Johnson.
6:00 P. M.-Devotional Meeting at
Wesley Hall. Speaker: Dean Jo-
seph A. Bursley.
P : ~

0
a
K
L
A

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson. Minister,
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Mr. Klaer will preach on "CAN
WE DARE TO BE CHRIS-
TIAN?" Summer Communion
Service.
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour and Sup-
per for young people.
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Meet-
ing. Professor G. Bernon Kelley
of Springfield, Ohio, will speak.

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCHI
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan S. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy- Communion.
11:00 A. M.-Holy Communion,
sermon by the Reverend Henry
Lewis, "Faith in Man."
6:00 P. M.-Student supper in
Harris Hall and special musical
program.
Tuesday open house at Harris Hall,
4:00-6:00.
I,

i

CARTTER'S I

GOOD

STEAKS

R

OY

TIlE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, JULY 4, 1931

t

Students Supply Store
1111 South University Ave.
Phone 4744
Engineers and Architects Materials
Stationery, Fountain Pens, Loose Leaf Books
Typewriting and Pound Papers
College Pennants and Jewelry
Leather Goods

THE
FIRST BAPTIST
B. Huron, below
R. Edward Sayles,
Howard R. Chapman,
Students.

'HURCH
State
Minister
Minister of

BE
CONSISTENT
IN
YOUR
RELIGION

9:30 A. M.-The Church School.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Mr. Sayles will preach on
"FAITH AND CREATIN'ENESS"
12:00 Noon - University Students
and friends in west transept of
church auditorium. Mr. E. M.
Javier graduate student in law who
has had ten years' law practice in
the Philippines will speak on
"PROGRESS IN THE
PHILIPPINESS"
Welcome to all.

ATTEND
CHURCH
REGULARLY

4

ti

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'etion

F ACULTY members here recently
submitted to Ohio State uni-
versity authorities a petition ask-
ing for a thorough investigation of
Prof. Herbert A. Miller's dismissal.
They are to be commended for the
action.
When Ohio State fired Professor
Miller, the president and the board
of trustees gave to the press a num-
ber of absurd excuses for their ac-
tion. Obviously, the reasons given,
were largely false. It is supposed
that he was too strongly opposed to
military training in universities. At
any rate, his dismissal was only too
apparently the result of opinions;
which he offered on public ques-:
tions. The astonishing thing is;
that he was qualified by a national;
reputation to give opinions on those
subjects, while neither the presi-
dent nor the board of trustees who
fired him was in a position to make
a judgment on his statements.
Freedom of expression is of the
greatest importance in the teach-
ing world. No professor could teach
effectively or even keep his self-re-
spect if he were restricted in his
opinions and not allowed to com-
ment on questions in which what-
ever group of trustees chance and
politics gave the university happen-
ed to have a personal interest.

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Fiih crih for t~hP Siirm~r Dziilv

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