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July 04, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-04

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, JULY 4, 1931

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

PACGE T 3JWI

1 I Q L1 X1111 D r .

SIIiflh flhi 11Il l IVIUD J
URNS MOllNASTERY SPOPJSW
>ldiers Guard Spanish Town; Announcement that Waite Hoyt
Priests Hide in Fear of has been released by Detroit to the
Further Outbreaks. Athletics via the waiver route leaves
only one of five men involved in a
CORUNNA, Spain, July 3-(I)- Detroit-New York trade two years
irned by a mob of about 3,000 ago with the club that obtained
en ad wmentheCapuhinhim. That man is Mark Koenig,
n and women, the Capuchin o, with Hoyt was claimed by the
onastery of San Jose was in Tigers in trade for Owen Carroll,
mouldering ruins today and its pitcher, Harry Rice, outfielder and
iests were biding in fear of fur- George Wuestling, shortstop. Koe-
er anti-religious outbreaks. nig is now serving as a replacement
The city was under rigid military unt in the Detro*t infield.

th

control with troops and civil guards
patroling the streets in compliance
with the order of Minister of In-
terior Miguel Maura that "order
must be maintained.."
Incensed by the resumption of
masses in the morning, the mob
swept out of a bull ring, where they
had listened to anti-church ad-
dresses, and set fire to the monas-
tery. Firemen who tried to save the
building were stoned and clubbed
and hoses were cut.
The monastery burned to the
ground along with four adjacent
homes.
The arrival of armed forces was
the signal for a pitched battle. The
troops charged with sabers and ri-
fles and the rioters countered with
stones, sticks and knives. The mob
finally was driven back while fiame.
devoured the monastery, built four
years ago at a cost of $50,000.
Part of the rioters raced to other
parts of the city and attempted to
fire the Jesuit college and the Do-
minican monastery, but were
thwarted by the vigilance of the
authorities. Three persons, includ-
ing a priest, were seriously wound-
ed during the night and about nine
others slightly hurt.
STUDENTS ATTEND
LEAGUETEAT DAC
Dr. Margaret Bell, Miss Lytle
Pour at Tea; University
Women Entertain.

Hoyt and Koenig were both past
the peak when the trade was made,
yet they have been more valuable
to Detroit than were Carroll, Rice;
and Wuestling to the Yankees. Car-
roll never did regain his stride after;
he had started slipping while withl
Detroit, and finally drifted back to
the minors. He is now having what1
Daily Of fcf I
Publication in the Bulletin is c
of the University. Copy received;
Summer Session until 3:30, excepti
VOLUME XI SATURDAY,;
be made the afternoon of Wednesd
p. m. and returning to Ann Arbor at
include the motorassembly plant,
hearth steel mill and the rolling, r
directly to the several places visited
Round trip tickets, $1.00, mayt
5 p. m., in the Summer Session off
Excursion No. 3-Niagara Falls
Geology will conduct the Summer Se
it has for many years. The trip isc
Cnminv r~i ih~i da i Tha a

OR/p SOFT BALL LE AGUE
is regarded generally as his last Eighteen games appear on the
mayo legue ppotunty, ithDanschool of education soft ball sched-
major league opportunity, with Dan ule, being run off under sponsor-
Howley's Cincinnati Reds. ship of the intramural sports de-
* * .*
Harry Rice played good ball for partment. Each team is to play
Detroit, but was the center of the twnce weekly, with games scheduled
dissension that kept the club down for next Monday, Thursday, July 9,
during the managerial days of and each Tuesday and Thursday
George Moriarty. He simply had to thereafter, through July 30.
go. At the present time his is a In the opening games, played on
reserve outer gardener with Wash- South Ferry field Thursday, the fac-
ington. George Wuestling natur- ulty team of the school defeated
ally drifted back to the minors. He the Principals 19 to 15, while the
was recruited by Detroit from the Teachers, made up of teachers en-
Coast league in mid-season, after rolled in education courses, took
Heinle Schuble had demonstrated the measure of the Superintendents,
that he was no more effective at 7 to 5. Interest is attached to the
short than a sieve and had wrecked league this year partly because the
the morale of half the pitching championship was undecided last
staff. Wuestling plugged up the' year. The Faculty team was win-
hole, but couldn't hit .200, and with ner in 1929.
Koenig obtainable, went to the The remainder of the schedule is
block. as follows:
July 6-Faculty vs. Superintend-
L a l B u 11 eti ents; Principals vs. Teachers.
July 9-Faculty vs. Teachers;
constructive notice to all members Principals vs. Superintendents.
at the office of the Dean of the July 14-Principals vs. Faculty;
ng Sundays. 11:30 a.m. Saturday. Teachers vs. Superintendents.
July 16-Superintendents vs. Fac-
JULY 4, 1931 NUMBER 6 ulty; Teachers vs. Principals.
July 21-Teachers vs. Faculty;
ay, July 8, the party leaving at 1 Principals vs. Superintendents.
5:45 p. m. The inspection tour will July 23-Faculty vs. Principals;
the final assembly line, the open Teachers vs. Superintendents.
mill, Special buses take the party July 28-Faculty vs. Superintend-
Syents; Teachers vs. Principals.
be secured before Tuesday, July 7, July 30-Faculty vs. Teachers;
ice, room 9 University Hall Principals vs. Superintendents.
Carlton F. We®ls
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-
and Vicinity: The Department of Orientation week here next fall will
ession excursion to Niagara Falls as be under the supervision of 97 stu-
open to all students of the Summer dents who were recently appointed
tv lPP at 1(:43 nm. Friday councilors.

Values $1.00, $1.3
a pair
Pure Sill
from regular stoc
Chiffon, Semi-
Service.
Sizes 81 to 101/2

f1
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TYPEW RITERS -.
OF ALL MAKES
BOUJGHT, SOLD, RENTED, .:' 7 _
EXCHANGED, CLEANED AND "i
REPAIRED. Portables
. c. Smith 01. D. MORRILL corona
3B4 South State Street arr
Underwood 34SuhStt tet Underwood
Ro al The Typewriter and Stationery Royal
Remington Store.
Phone 6615 Remington
We have served Michigan and its students since 1908.
I Monay Spcial"

1I

A PAIR

Lau ra Belle Shoppe
On State at East Liberty
PHONE 22631
Subscribe to The Summer Michigan Daily

SessI.on anL e IuIh rlenS. "tie prar y teave p.Imot,'J u k-' ., ..y,
July 10, returning to Ann Arbor at 11:45 p. m., Sunday, July 12.
This year the excursion is being taken under very favorable circum-
stances, the total cost being less than $25.00, which is the lowest for a
number of years. This total includes expenses for all the important
features at the Falls as well as for railroad fare, hotel accommodations,
and the like. Nearly two days will be spent in the Niagara area.
Further information concerning the itinerary and trip details is
available at the Summer Session office, room 9, University Hall. Reserva-
tions must be made in the Summer Session office before Thursday,
July 9, 5 p. m. W. H. Hobbs
Faculty Concert: Professor Palmer Christian, University organist,
will give the following program, Tuesday evening, July 7, at 8:15 o'clock
in Hill Auditorium, to which summer school students as well as the

More than 150- University faculty;
members and students were guests
of the Women's League at their op-;
ening tea dance of the summer yes-
terday afternoon in the Grand Ra-
pids room and concourse of the7
League building.
Dr. Margaret Bell, director of the
Department of Physical Education,
and Miss Mary Lytle, director of
Betsy Barbour house, poured at the
tea. Music for an hour of dancing
was furnished by Henry Lundquist
and his orchestra.
Guests of honor, including wives
of University professors and offic-
ials and other prominent local wo-
men were: Mrs. Junius E. Beal, Mrs.
Herbert C. Sadler, Mrs. Frederick G.'
Novy, Mrs. G. Carl Huber, Mrs. Ira
Smith, Mrs. Barbara Bartlett, head
of Nursing Education, Mrs. E. H. C.
Oliphant, of New York City, and
Mrs. Esther Martin, secretary of the
Michigan State Cippled Children
Commission.
Among the University women who
assisted in entertaining during the
affair were Miss Ethel McCormick,
Dean of Women, Miss Katherine
Noble, director of social activities,
Katherine O'Hearn, '31, president
of the League, Eugenie Chapel, '32,
Betty Campbell, '31, Annette .Cum-
mings, '33, Dorothy Wilber, Marga-
ret Butler, Elizabeth Landress, Le-
na Brammer, Adelle Schukwit, Ir-
ene Botzner, Ruth Krueger, Irene
Holshuh. and Julia Yacon.

general public are cordially invited:
Guilmant: Marche religieuse;
James: Andante cantabile, Finale,
(Sonata No. 1); Rameau: Air Ma-
jestueux; Rameau: Musette en
Rondeau; Frescobaldi: Toccata per
l'Elevazione; Bach: Passacaglia and
Fugue in C Minor.
(Continued on page 4)

MAJES TI
STARTING TODAY

GREETING CARDS
for all occasions

-

0. D. MORRILL
314 South State Street
The Typewriter and Stationery Store

i

I

3RIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Street

TODAY, 11:30 to 1:30
POTATO SALAD WITH
COLD MEAT
BACON AND EGGS, TOAST
COFFEE, MILK
30c
5:30 to 7:30
BROILED T-BONE STEAK
PORK CHOPS
MASHED POTATOES
SPINACH AND TOMATOES
35c
SPECIAL SUNDAY
12-2, 5:30-7:30
BROILED SPRING CHICKEN

U

ALSO

LEILA
HYAMS
and
NORMAN
FOSTER

Cartoon
Comedy
News

WANT ADS PAY
Michigan
-TODAY-
Adolph
Men jou

tn

"Men Call
It Love"

The Michigan is a delightful
place to spend an afternoon.
When its 90 on the street,
come in. Cool 70 degree tem-
peratures-You'll like it!
-SUNDAY -
Jean Harlow
"PUBLIC
ENEMY"
James Caney

with

-I

HAS YOUR
KrrCHEN STOWE
THESE ELECTROCHEF
FEATURESt
EAC T HEAT CONTROL
ASn aed ch eat control elimi-
nates gueswock and makes
- a ,a ugeasy
S FASTEST OVEN YOU
EwE UWED
p eat
Miaimm pro-heating a
-Wy o
SEALED-IN FLAVOR
pICTHOCHEF electric cook-"

ELECTROCHEF electric range

never overheats the
kitchen"
"I efoy using my ELECTROCHEF in summer
--cooking with this modern range is surprisingly
cool! Even baking and roasting do not over-
heat the kitchen. The semi-sealed oven and
double airspace insulation keeps all the heat
Inside. I don't know of anything that adds
mre tokitchencomfort thanmy ELECTROCHEF
--it's a stoyve any .woman will appreciate. In
warm weather especially, I'd hate to be with-
out it!"
-*A study of one thousand families using the ELECTRO.
CHEF electric range showed a cooking cost of less than
onse cent a meal a person.
THE DETROIT EDISON co.
Also and demonstrated by the J. L Hudson Company,
Crowity, Miner & Company, the T. B. Rayl Company, the
Ernst Kern Company and the Good Housekeeping Shop

EXTRA
WORLD FLIERS
IN NEW YORK
COMEDY-REVIEW
WEDNESDAY
WM. POWELL

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