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July 03, 1931 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-03

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THE SUMMER. MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY,' JULY 3, 1931

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, JULY 3,1931

3T1r t utWtP2
thant it

ublished every morning except Monday
ng the University Summer Session by the
d in Control of Student Publications.
hte Associated Press is exclusively entitled!
he use for republication of all news dis-
4es credited to it or not otherwise credited
this paper and the local news published
in. All rights of republication of special
atches herein are also reserved.
ntered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post.
e as second class matter.
'bscription by carrier, $1.50; by mail,
5.
ifices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Arbor, Michigan.
elephones: Editorial, 4925; Business

EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
HAROLD O. WARREN, JR.
rial Director........... Gurney Williams
Editor............... Powers Moulton
Editor...............Denton Kunze
c, Drama, Books .... William J. Gorman
en's Editor. .......... Eleanor Rairdon
is Editor.............C. H. Beukema
graph Editor............. L. R. Ohubb
Night Editors

nton Kunae
an Bunting
'len R. Carr
W. Oarpente
gar Eckert
rbara Hall
gare HorulIc
arles C. Irw:

Powers Moulton
Gurney Williams
AssistAnts
Susan Manchester
In Carl Meloy
or Alfred Newman
Sher M. Quraishi
Edgar Racine
Theodore Rose
in Brackley Shaw
P. Cutler Showers

BUSINESS STAFF
.BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R. WORBOYS
sistant Business Manager .. Vernon Bishop
[rulation & Accounts Manager .. Ann Verner
rntracts Manager............ Carl Marty
Ivertising Manager ..........Beach Conger
Assistants
Corbett Franklin-Ralph Hardy

Don Lyon

srw.ayaaa aaaa uy

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 1931
Night Editor-POWERS MOULTON
INDEPENDENCE
T OMORROW the nation will
celebrate another Independence
day-and Sunday's papers will
scream out new and appalling stor-
ies of injury and death through
fireworks, drownings, and other
causes characteristic of national
holidays, celebrated by Americans
in their own inimitable manner.
There was a time when the
Fourth was termed glorious. Peo-
ple gave a thought to its signifi-
cance and celebrated appropriately.
In the last decade, however, most
of this patriotic sentiment has been
destroyed by laws restricting per-
sonal freedom, and a general wan-
ing of interest in figures of our his-
torical background.
The old practice of disturbing the
peace and blowing off fingers with
fireworks represented something of
the spirit of the day, but because
of inevitable fatalities, this form is
being legally ruled out. For the
sake ofhumanity it is, of course,
desirable, but nothing adequate has
yet been substituted for this lib-
erty.
Waning interest in the men re-
sponsible for Independence day has
been brought about by history de-
bunkers whose searching but un-
admirable researches make George
Washington's name synonymous
with loose living, infer that Abra-
ham Lincoln was mentally unbal-
anced, and maintain that our Pil-
grim fathers were sots, addicted to
rum drinking and moral decay.
It is refreshing to read reports
of strenuous efforts to keep some of
the more unnecessary details out of
the hands of school children who
will either build up or discard re-
spect for our national figures. More
attention should be paid to the sort
of effort expended during the last
three years by school children all
over the country in restoring "Old
Ironsides" to something of its for-
,mer glory. This type of historical
monument will go a long way to-
ward keeping historical traditions
on a plane commensurate with its
value.
Because of growing antipathy in-
duced by our modern civilization
the Fourth of July has come more
and more to mean merely a day's
vacation from work, a chance to
play golf on crowded course, an
opportunity to swim at bathing
beaches jam-packed with hot hu-
manity and scattered picnic lunch-
es, an excuse to become alcoholi-
cally merry, and an occasion to
march in feebe parades witnessed
by persons who like band music but
have no idea of the words to The
Star Spangled Banner.
The celebration of the Fourth
per se is not to be held in con-
tempt, but the present method of
observing the holiday leaves much
to be desired. It is to be hoped
that in time the Fourth will be
reformed into something akin to a1
sensible holiday, observed by meth-
ods that are Safe and Sane- an
expression that means little to mil-
lions of Americans and yet means
evervthing n their welfare.

-o
Editorial Comment
Liberal Minded
(The Purdue Exponent)
Liberal, unbiased judgment should
be one of the highest goals in the
process of education. A university
should be a means to attain this
goal, but is often is not. There
seems to have been a time, quite
some while ago, when a university
education implied that the individ-
ual receiving it had delved into the
heart of things, and that by this
delving deeply he had gained in-
sight, understanding, and a liberal
outlook. His mind had been devel-
open by long reading and long
thinking in a monastic atmosphere
that had made such things possi-
ble. This student of old lived sim-
ply and wh'en he finally terminated
his career at the university he had
a mind almost wholly matured and
capable of logical thinking.
Obviously this method of secur-
ing a liberal mind has been com-
pletely replaced by a method (or
can it be classed thus?) which is
the exact antithesis. It is extreme-
ly doubtful whether two such op-
posite means can reach the same
goal. Is there anything in our cur-
riculum, anything in our university
environment which is conducive of
deep thinking, uninterrupted study,
or above all silent solitude? How
then can we hope to reach a clear
soutlook if we are mired in triviali-
ties? How is deep penetration pos-
sible if our minds are filled with
superficialities?
A university education should not
be a process of conforming; it
should not be a submerging of per-
sonality. It should be the reverse.
Instead of smothering individuality
under the weight of crowd dicta-
tion, it should foster and cultivate
it as the one thing worth while.
Instead of being dissolved, a per-
sonality should be resolved. But
how in this confusion we frequently
miscall education can this result
be attained? What place have ac-
tivities, organizations, clubs, ath-
letics, and social affairs in this seri-
ous business of education? A
wholesome limitation of these
might not be objectionable, as the
present excess is not compatible
with real education.
Let's Have a Real Fight
(The Daily Iowan)
Once again the ballyhooers have
glossed over the unsatisfactory as-
pects of the past enough to stage
another "battle of the century" for
the world's heavyweight boxing
championship.
Despite long counts, "foul" deci-
sions, bicycle tactics, and "scientif-
ic" boxing, there are plenty of peo-
ple who still have hope of seeing
again the old style slug-fest that
once characterized the pathway to
the heavy-weight championship.
American ballyhooers are the best
in the world, and they are more
than able to compensate for the
past deficiencies of Stribling and
Max Schmeling's readiness to be
fouled, by playing on the interna-
tional aspect of the July 3 set-to.
Schmeling has taken the crown
away from America, therefore ev-

ery loyal citizen owes it to his coun-
try to buy a fight ticket and cheer
for Stribling even though he might
bet on Schmeling, is the theme of
their music.
Overlooking the ridiculous lengths
to which such propaganda is car-
ried, the public is entitled to an
honest-to-goodness fight when the
two giants enter the ring Friday.
Furthermore the country has got-
ten to a place where it demands a
real mixup for its money if it is to
continue supporting professional
boxing.
Let those who will profit by the
fight lure the buyers of tickets to
the box office by any reasonable
means, but whatever happens, let
there be a first rate fight for the
fans' money.
Ballyhoo has roused the jaded in-
terest of the public for one more
time; if this final test is a failure,
million dollar gates will fall into
obscurity of history even though
there might be a dozen potential
Jack Dempseys ready to put on a
real show in years to come.
The lovely co-ed who thinks the
moratorium is a place where they
bury the dead is not so dumb.
Add to Ripley's collection: Post
and Gatty left Khabarovsk Monday
at 5 p. m. and landed near Nome at
9-4 n .m the samed av?

lOASTED ROLL
BACKi
ON THE
JOB AGAIN
Fortunately, the whole Wnoofie
family was overcome yesterday
whie delivering ice, so tuat they
will not be on nand to indite tisl
usual Rolls column. (That's notj
the way to spell that-Ed.) (Wno's
writing this column, anyway? El-
mer.) Anyway, little Dick Rover
crashed through with a poem,
which is pery appropriate. You
know, the Whoofes are a fun-lov-
ing crowd. The Doctor was watch-
ing the excavations over on State
Street the other day, and it appears
that all the workmen had parked
their cars nearby while working.
(No, pardon me, before working.)
Anyway, he thought it would be an,
excellent joke on them to pull out1
all the choke-rods on the Fords,
bend them down, and leave.
Yes, he left in a hurry. Charly
Hoyt is looking for him. He needs
a good two-miler for next fall.
Oh yes, the poem. We almost
forgot about it.
Now they're cutting down The
Daily;
Just four pages until fall.
Maybe they won't need a Rolls
Column
It's a fine world after all.
Although Post and Gatty may
have performed a miracle by get-
ting around the world in eight
days, the Rolls Editorial Board has
awarded them the annual Booby
prize for .leaving Alaska in weather
like this. Just think of all that
good ice going to waste up there.
Who is little Yvonne Fagan?
Dear me, I thought that we had
disposed of that during the school
year. But embarrassing questions
do pop up at such inopportune
moments. Anyway, the Rolls silver
Joe Zilch medal is still unclaimed,
and anyone who identifies the
young lady in question can have it.
Our neighboring columns, we see
by this morning's paper, are as dead
as usual. But how they ever .had
the temerity to print that campus
opinion in re the journalism de-
partment versus The Daily was as-
tounding. As everyone knows, the
journalism department doesn't
think much of The Daily, and vice-
versa. After all, this column is the
only one that counts at all.
IGNORE THE MAY FESTIVAL.
Shades of Zeus, another dis-
ease recurring again. We got
so tired concentrating on ig-
noring the May Festival last
year, that it got so that we went
around the streets muttering
under our breaths "I WILL ig-
nore the May Festival; I WILL
ignore the May Festival" so that
everyone thought we were de-
mented. (You probably are-
Ed.) (Oh you think, so do you?
Elmer.)
And another thing, if that edi-
tor doesn't stop putting in slurs in
this here my column, I will resign.
That, what will you do about that?
(Accept. Ed).
"~

...
Picture of Elmer Talking to the,
Editor
Oh yes, we almost forgot. To-
morrow is the Fourth! Just thinly
of that. But everything will be all
right. Sunday will be the fifth, so
we just can't do anything about it.
We might even go over and step on
the library seal, just out of pure
spite, but the library won't be open.
We might even bolt classes, but
there aren't any classes anyway. We
haven't enough money to buy boot-
legged- firecrackers, so what can we
do to be real wicked? Nothing.
Oh, dear, the futility of life.
Ho hum. We wonder what 1
the printer thinks of when, he
sets up this column. (Nothing
-printer.) We'll bet he thinks
it's pretty funny. So I guess
we'll end up for today with an
other nice poem, especially
written, copyrighted and print-
ed for the Rolls Column.
Skies above are hot and sultry
Down below the earthworms
crawl;
Maybe they will eat somebody
Maybe it would be a fine worldI
after all.{
That's all for today. Hence to the3
ice water.s
Elme Gantrv

Screen Reflections
The summer screen season open-
ed this year with two excellent
shows at the local theatres, "Men
Call It Love" at the Michigan, and
"The Tarnished Lady" at the Ma-
jestic. (Last performance today.)
Both offer entertainment for the
first part of the week end, and it
should be unnecessary to mention
the 70 degree temperature as an
added feature.
AT THE MAJESTIC
Tallulah Bankhead, who, accord-
ing to press reports, created no lit-
tle sensation on the London stage,
made her screen debut in "Tarnish-
ed Lady" and proves that she can
do equally well in the pictures. The
story starts out with the old situa-
tion of the daughter whose mother
wants her to marry for money, but
from there on the plot is new and
entertaining. Miss Bankhead, and
opposite her the suave Clive Brook,
carry the entire picture very well.
We were afraid at the beginning
that the whole thing would rather
sag in the middle, but the two prin-
cipals kept the interest in the play
every minute. The lines were good,
and found Mr. Brook in a not-so-
debonnair part as compared to
those in which he is accustomed to
playing. Miss aBnkhead's apparent
indifference to the world and its
ways, her intense desire to do the
right thing, and her frank speeches
were admirably done. This new star
presents a curious melange of the
languid Greta Garbo, the vivacious
Nancy Carroll, and the tempera-
mental Norma Shearer, and she ap-
parently can adapt herself to any
situation or role which comes her
way.
The Lowell Thomas feature was
better than usual, but we wish-oh
how we wish-that he would soon
finish that round-the-world jaunt
of his.
AT THE MICHIGAN
On Liberty street, the younger
married set, with the aid of Adolphe
Menjou, Norman Foster, Mary Dun-
can and Leila Hyams, show what
Dame Rumor, coupled with man-
hunting wives, can do to marriages.
The picture opens with the young
married couple, portrayed by Nor-
r:". .4::
man Foster and Leila Hyams, pur-
sued by Adolphe Menjou and Mary
Duncan. As the story unfolds it-
self, Miss Hyams undertakes to get
even with her husband for his sup-
posed marital infidelities by hav-
ing an affair of her own. At last
the bubble bursts, and peace and
harmony reign as the picture closes.
Although Menjou is featured as
the star, he is forced to share the
spotlight with the other three prin-
cipals mentioned above. We see
him in the role of the bachelor-

golfer, whose interests lie not alto-
gether on the links. But Norman
Foster and Mary Duncan complete-
ly steal his thunder. As the young
husband, Foster is at times impul-
sive, sheepish, loving, or non-cha-
demands, while
Miss Duncan, al-
though somewhat
handicapped by a
dyspeptic hus-
band, manages to
lose him enough
of the time to
steal other wo-
men's more or less
faithful spouses.
Miss Hyams is
not as successful
as she might have
been in the part MARY DUNCAN
bof the wife, being at times bril-
liant, sometimes rather dull. All
in all, we suspect that the gay life
of fashion led by the actors in the
play may not be altogether true to
today, but that did not keep us
from enjoying the whole thing,
from beginning to end.
COMING ATTRACTIONS
"Indiscreet," featuring Gloria
Swanson, opens tomorrow at the
Majestic, while "Public Enemy" fol-
lows the present picture at the
Michigan Sunday. For the benefit
of our new patrons-new movies be-
gin at the Majestic on Wednesdays
and Saturdays, at the Michigan on
Thursdays and Sundays.

Summer
Student
Directory
Coming Soon
CARTTER' S
M '-'yRU45r 4
N'
R -y. K
E
u -- Ce N
LUNCH
GOOD STEAKS
BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Street
TODAY, 11:30 to 1:30
SALMON SALAD
WITH POTATO CHIPS
VEAL CROQUETTES WITH
CREAMED POTATOES, PEAS
JELLO
COFFEE, ORANGE PUNCH
30c
5:30 to 7:30
SOUP
BABY PIKE, CUCUMBER SAUCE
BREADED VEAL CUTLETS
ROAST BEEF, HORSERADISH
BAKED HAM, RAISIN SAUCE
MASHED OR FRENCH FRIED
POTATOES
STRING BEANS OR BEETS
TUNA FISH SALAD WITH
POTATO CHIPS
ASPARAGUS TIPS
35c
TODAY
CLIVEBROOK
T I in
ARNISHED LADY"

with
LEILA
HYAMS
and
NORMAN
FOSTER

The Michigan is a delightful
place to spend an afternoon.
When its 90 on the street,
come in. Cool 70 degree tem-
peratures-You'll like it!
SUNDAY

Michigan
-TODAY-
Adolph
Men jou
"6Men Call
It Love"

I

Also
Cartoon
Comedy
News

"PUBLIC

ENEMY"

Majestic
2:00, 3:40, 7:00, 9:00
SATURDAY
GLORIF
Siimmaosoo
K[EIA BRO wHEB[DIROn
P P U C T 1 0
I bEnLYon lugub
LEO m'CtArEY
ufliT*O AP.TI$TS PICTUA*

EXTRA ADDED
HEARST WORLD NEWS
PATHE REVIEW = SCREEN SONG
COMING WEDNESDAY
WM. POWELL "LADIES MAN"
TAKE A RIDE ON
ST. ASMOO

4 -

J

TO
DtlDT

ika

rv I

__

m

COME TO DETROIT
any day this Summer, park your car on the dock, and enjoy this all-day
sail over the great International Highway of Lakes and Rivers. Free
Dancing on the boat. Splendid Cafeteria and Lunch Service. See Detroit
river front, Belle Isle, Lake St. Clair, the Flats and the celebrated "Venice
of America." This cruise of 61 miles each way takes you through a con-
stantly changing panorama of rare land and water views.
Port Huron, Sarnia, St. Clair Flats, Algonac
Starting this trip from Port Huron passengers leave at 3:10 p. m., arriving
in Detroit at 7:45 p. m. Returning, leave Detroit at 9 the next morning,
arriving in Port Huron at 2:10 p. m.
Str. Tashmoo leaves Griswold St. Dock at 9 a. m., Daily and Sunday ,arrive
Port Huron 2:10 p. mn. Returning,- leave PORT HURON, 3:10 p. mn., arrive
Detroit 7:45 p. m.- FARES: Tashmoo Park or St. Clair Flats, week days 75c;
Sundays, $1.00, R. T. Port Huron or Sarnia, Ont., one way, $1.10, R.T. $2.
. TASHMOO PARK
halfway between Detroit and Port Huron is Detroit's favorite pleasure park
where you may spend six hours and return on Str. Tashmoo in the
evening. Free dancing in the pavilion; picnic in the grove, baseball,,golf
and all outdoor sports and amusements.
RailoadTick ts uron, are good on Str. Tashmoo either direction
Railroad TiCkets rIng G. T. Ry. b*eee"netr" n Por
Dancing Moonlights to Sugar Island
Drive to Detroit and enjoy an evening of music and dancing on Str.
Tashinoo and in the pavilion at Sugar Island. Tickets 75c. Park on the
dock. Leave at 8:45 every evening.
RANDOLPH POPULAR STR. TASHMOO FotoIGrI-d.

I

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