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July 30, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-30

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TH tSDAN. JUTfY 30, 1931

T88 SUMMER MICWGAN DAILY

lh 11

THUrvfl .aYJULY.3.193 _ ESUMUR M .. d .iLYPM
I I

RALRAS ANED
WAGE REDUCTIONS
WILL BE__OPPOSED
Pressure of Depression Should
Not Be Used as Excuse for
Lower Standard, Claim.
RAIL LABOR ORGANIED
Appeal for Increase in Freight
Rates Referred to Interstate
Commerce Commission.
WASHINGTON, July 29.-(P)-A
warning that organized railroad
labor would resist to the utmost all
efforts to reduce wages was issued
late Tuesday as the administrative
reaffirmed its policy of opposition
to a lower wage scale.
The Railway Labor Executives
association declared in a statement
that agreements existed between
representatives of employers and
employes and the government "not
to permit the pressure of a busi-
ness depression to be used as the
excuse for breaking down the
American standard of living."
The statement was made in con-
nection with the application of the
railroads for a 15 per cent increase
in freight rates in order to meet
exigencies occasioned by reduced
revenues during the depressed eco-
nomic situation. The railroad labor
executives said the petition of the
railroads should be considered by
the interstate commerce commis-
sion on its merits.
Advice Not Lacking.
"The commission will not lack in-v
formation, advice and assistance int
determining whether railroad rev-@
enues can be, and ought to be in-
creased through freight rates," thep
statement said. "We are in favor
of increases in instances where ther
facts disclose that such increasesc
are justifiable."
"Unfortunately," it added, "the
iuestion of the reasonableness of
railway wages has been injected
into the pending proceeding, firstI
through its discussion in the rail-
road petition, and then through ob-
jections to the rate increase offer-
ed by various protestants claiming
that instead of increasing freight
rates the roads should reduce
wages. The injection of this issue
into the rate hearing is unwar-
ranted."
The labor executives added that
railroad wages were not high and
that several hundred thousand rail-
way men had been out of work for
more than a year and others had
been employed only part time. The
nation-wide depression, they ex-
plained, had been caused "by low
wages, the excessive profits of the
few and the underpayment of the
many."
Two Days of Debate.
The statement was issued after
two days of debate and almost sim-3
ultaneously with the restatement of
the administration's views on the
wage situation.
After the cabinet met with Presi-
dent Hoover, the White House re-
leased a statement declaring:
"No member of the administra-
tion has expressed the view or
holds the view that the policy of
the administration in advocating
maintenance of wages should be
changed. It has not been chang-

It referred to the discussion of a
letter written by Secretary Lamont
to Representative Condon, Demo-
crat, Rhode Island, which said
some industries had been forced to
reduce wages or shut down and
that the government should not in-
terfere in such cases. Condon has
called the commerce department
chief's attention to a wage slash in
the textile industry in his state.
Sports Woman

Youthful Trainer

PLANE PROGRESSES
WITH MAP SURVEY
IN UPPER MICHIGAN

Robot Eye Replaces Mathematician in Solving
Difficult Problems at University of Arizona

Federal and State

Departments

Clyde Beatty,
Youthful animal trainer, who
will appear with a display of more
than 30 Bengal and Siberian ti-
gers and African lions when the
Hagenbeck - Wallace circus plays
here next Monday. No other Amer-
ican trainer has appeared with so
many ferocious beasts, circus offi-
cials say.
OIL WAR STILL ON;

Combine in Photographing
Two Counties by Air.
OTHER AREAS CHECKED
Lack of Funds Blocks Continued
Topographic Mapping for
Lower Peninsula.
(Special to The Daily)
LANSING, July 29.-Two addi-
tional upper peninsula counties,
Marquette and Dickinson, are being
photographed from the air this
summer by the United States Geo-
logical survey and the Michigan
Highway and Conservation depart-
ments.
The photographs will be used to
form base maps on a two inches
to one mile scale. Early this sum-
mer the army airplane used to take
the photographs completed Delta
county with the photographing of
about 800 square miles, finishing,
Work started last year. The plane
is now working over Marquette,
county and will begin Dickinson as;
soon as that area is completed.
Ground Crew Checking.
While photographing is in prog-
ress in Marquette and Dickinson
counties, a ground crew is checking
over the area photographed last
year in Mackinac, Schoolcraft and
parts of Delta. Using preliminary
maps made from the photographs'
the ground crew is making accurate
identifications, and is sketching out
parts missed by photographs such
as borders of swamps and parts of'
small streams hidden by forest
growths. When the checking is
finished the final maps will be pre-
pared and printed. It is expected
that the first of these maps will be
ready for public distribution in a
few weeks. Each of the maps will
cover about 205 square miles and
will be the most accurate maps of
these areas ever made.
Gogebic County Mapped.
About 465 square miles of Gogebic
county have been photographed by
private interests. Inspection of
the photographs has shown them to
be very satisfactory for mapping
purposes and the state and feder-
al governments, by contributing a
small part of the cost will be able
to obtain these pictures for public
use. The area represents about
half of Gogebic county.
Because of lack of funds no topo-
graphic mapping is being done in
the lower peninsula this season.
It is planned to complete airplane
,mapping of the upper peninsula
and then begin work south of the
Straits of Mackinac. The western
portions of the counties along the
west side of the state have been
completed. Eventually the entire
state north of a line drawn from
Midland and Mt. Pleasant and Mus-
kegon will be photographed and
mapped.

Combination of Mirrors, Lenses
Works Complex Examples
in Few Minutes.
TUSCON, Ariz., July 29.-(IP)-
University of Arizona has a robot
mathematician eye that solves in
a few minutes problems over which
a mathematician would labor for
hours.
The eye is a combination of mir-
rors and lenses. Its problems are
solved by placing them in a beam
of light, which reflects them to a
scale where the result can be read.
These problems are not tables of
figures, but the familiar mathe-
BUILDING OF PRISON,
AWAITED AT MILAN

matical symbol known as a graph,
or "curve," a plotted line repre-
senting such things as the fuel con-
sumption rate of an automobile en-
gine, or the average distance to
1,000 stars.
Especially adept is the eye at
discovering in these curves any
hidden rhythmic cycles, periods of
time when the same phenomenon
recurs regularly. Examples are the
sunspots cycles or rainfall cycles
in a period of 50 years. The eye
discloses these cycles readily,
whereas the mathematical method
reguires working them out by the
system of "least squares."
The eye was invented by an as-
tronomer, Dr. A. E. Douglass, di-
rector of Steward observatory, to
save himself the tedious compu-
tations. It is too large for his obser-
vatory space, and he keeps it in the
basement of the University Athletic
building.
He traces the "curve" on a piece
of Manila paper about a yard long
and then cuts it out with scissors.
This gives him a piece of paper
whose top edge is a wavy line. The
edge is set across the beam of
light. The amount of light passing
from the beam to the calculator
varies according to the shape of
the curve.

Site for Federal Farm Takes
198-Acre Tract Adjoining
Village on North.

in

MILAN, Mich., July 29.-(i)-
Residents of this village today were
awaiting official word from Wash-
ington as to when work will start
on a federal prison farm, which,
announcement from Washington
said, will be established near here.
The site selected, according to
dispatches from Washington Tues-
day comprises 198 acres, adjoining
Milan on the north. It lies along
Highway US-23 and has frontage
on the Wabash railroad. It is 411
miles from Detroit and 35 miles
from Toledo.
A. G. Forsythe of Milan, agent
for the land owners, said Milan
officials had agreed to extend wa-
ter mains to serve buildings on the
,new farm. He said the site was one
of 150 offered the government in
this general vicinity.
The farm, which will represent
an investment of approximately
$200,000 and will house 600 prison-
ers, will be used for detention of
short term prisoners, sentenced
principally from federal courts in
Detroit and Grand Rapids
TYPEWRITING
MIMEOGRAPHING
and
A speciality for twenty
years.
Prompt service . . . Experienced oper-
ators . . . Moderate rates.

Enjoy A Splendid
Luncheon or Dinner
QUIETLY SERVED
in the
MAIN DINING ROOM
MICHIGAN
LEAGUE
Luncheons 75c
Dinners $1.00
Phone 23251

GOOD WRITES BOOK
ON TERMREPORTS
New Manual Explains Practices
Acceptable in Composing
Theses, Papers.
Waren R. Good, of the School of
Education, has just completed a
manual, "How to Prepare Term
Reports," Dean J. B. Edmonson an-
nounced yesterday. The manual
is intended to meet the demands of
students for a brief statement of
acceptable practices to be observed
in the composition of theses and
term papers, he said.
Instruction on finding material,
organizing notes, preparing tables,
and preparing bibliographies is in-
cluded in the manual, which also
gives many suggestions to aid in the
writing of the reports. A check list
to be used by students as an in-
ventory of the form of their papers
is also given. The check list is in-
tended to help students discover
deficiencies in their reports before
they are submitted to the instruct-
or.
"Advanced students in education
will be expected to follow the in-
structions in the manual in the
preparation of reports," Dean Ed-
monson said yesterday.

Murray Threatens Shutdown
Oklahoma If Crude Price
Continues Low.

in

OKLAHOMA CITY, July 29.--('P)
-A period of watchful waiting, with
Saturday night the zero hour, was
in store for producers of Oklahoma
crude oil today, while major pur-
chasers guardedly viewed latest
proceedings in the embattled Mid-
continent area.
The price of oil at the well, now,
40 to 50 cents a barrel after a
recent climb from a low of 10 cents
must be $1 a barrel or a complete
shutdown on all but stripper wells
will be ordered, Gov. W. H. Mur-
ray declared Tuesday.
What is more the governor
threatened that if the oil producers
do not swing into line peaceably
with the proposed shutdown of
wells martial law will be declared
in the fields to enforce the order.
Murray used National Guardsmen
over the week-end to hold Red
River bridge approaches near Du-
rant, Okla., in a dispute with Texas
authorities.

0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone

6615

-

%~i.

TRY THE
DELICIOUS
HOME COOKED
FOOD
at the
Haunted
Tavern
417 EAST HURON ST.
Lunch 50c and 75c
Dinner $1.00
Sunday Dinner . .$1.50

:

WANT ADS PAY

II&I

31

r'

RAGGEDY ANN
BEAUTY SHOP
Shampoo . . . . . 50c
Soft Water
Finger Wave . . 75c
OPEN EVENINGS
Dial 7561 1115 South University

FREES
TeeDiscontinued
TeModels of

Another swimming party open to
all of the women enrolled in the
University will be held tomorrow
afternoon at one of the nearby
lakes. All those wishing to attend
may buy tickets in Barbour gym-1
nasium some time before Friday
noon, to cover the cost of supper
and transportation. Cars will leave
the gymnasium at 5 o'clock and
return at 7:30 o'clock.
Washington Taxi War
May Close Saturday
WASHINGTON, July 29.-(VP)-
Ten-cent cab fares are expected to
come to an end in the capital Sat-
. ..A. s yav yh n 5 centa minimum

Parker Pencils
formerly $3 to $5
Pencils are brand new
and mechanically per-
fect, of non-breakable
Permanite. One given
with every latest style
Parker Pen at $3.50 to
$10, including Guaran-
teed for Life Duofold
Pens. This amazing
offer good only for a
short time. Hurry!
O. D. MORRILL

r

Final Reduction
ENTIRE STOCK OF
HATS

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FOR
Books,
We have many valuable books priced
far below cost, which you may find
helpful to you.
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Thursday

Thursday

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Originally to $15.00

While They Last
Seta 300 Hats 50c
SpeCil
Values to $5.00

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