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July 30, 1931 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-30

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PAGE TWO

T8E SUMMER. MMORIGAN DAILY

rP-TTT"R.CTIAV TTTT.V Qn lo,%l

y W. aaaa~~~~~HE~IMR ouMeaau~uAW sna~I "'iit .L.VJLYau u

t is #rtt rt
PuMish' aevery morning except Monday
the University Summer Session by the
soa in Coentrol of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
We the. use. for republication of all news dis-
patees credited to it oranot otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein. Al rights of republication of special
dispatches, herein..are. also reserved.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
ofice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.50; by mall,
$1.75.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Telephones: Editorial, 4923; Business
2 1214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
HAROLD 0. WARREN, JR.
Editorial Director.......... Gurney Williams
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
0. W. Carpenter Carl Meloy
L. R. Chubb Sher M. Quraishi
Brbara Hall Eleanor Rairdon
Susan Manchester Marion Thornton
P. Cutler Showers
BUSINESS STAFF
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R. WORBOYS
Assistant Business Manager .. Vernon Bishop
Contracts Manager .............Carl Marty
Advertising Manager . ...... Jack Bunting
Accounts. Circulation........Thomas Muir
Night Editor-C. W. CARPENTER
THURSDAY, JULY 30, 1931

MOTORLESS
FLYING

G LIDERS, the forerunners of the
motored plane, popped into the
news again the other day when
Lieutenant Crane established an
unofficial gliding record of 16 hours
and 38 minutes in Hawaii. Exhaus-
tion forced his descent and there is
no way of knowing how many more
hours the Lieutenant may have
been able to keep the glider in the
air, but the commercial possibil-
ities of motorless flying are becom-
ing increasingly real as new rec-
ords are established.
With five long air flights now in
progress (trans-Atlantic, polar, and
otherwise) glider stories are being
relegated to obscure corners of the
nation's newspapers, and yet Lieu-J
tenant Crain's flight, and that of
Rudolf Kronfeld who recently
crossed the English Channel in a
glider, point to practical benefits
chiefly concerning themselves with
air trains. Air train enthusiasts
predict a realization of their dreams
in the not far distant future, when
western air expresses will uncouple
a train of gliders one by one as they
passover "depots" along the line
of flight. The individual gliders will
spiral slowly to earth with their
load of passengers and the "locomo-
tive" will continue toward its des-I
tination. Even conservative engin-
eers. admit the technical plausibil-
ity of such a prediction.

What Others Say
THE DIPLOMATIC
MYTH
(Daily Ilini)
The sooner that university stu-
dents realize that a diploma is not
a certain protection against fail-
ure, the sooner will a great percent-
age of the college graduates of to-
day who are less successful in their
respective fields of business, begin
to prosper. One of the greatest disil-
lusionments for the young diploma
holder comes at the moment when
it is impressively inculcated in his
mind that the parchment or sheep-
skin that he possesses does not
mean that he s infallible.
Men and women today should
strive to alleviate this mythical be-
lief. When parents begin to realize
that a diploma from this university
or that does not assure their child-
ren of success in life, a perceptible
betterment in conditions will be ex-
perienced throughout the collegiate
world.
Colleges and universities are find-
ing one of their greatest questions
of educational policy in the alle-
viation of this diploma myth, and
the aid parents may give in this
direction would be invaluable.
The diploma myth, more likely
than not, owes its existence to the
beliefs and attitude of the parents
of college men and women. Regis-
trar Frank O. Holt of the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin says that "par-
encs are all too often to blame for
the attitude of a university stu-
dent that a diploma is a certain
protection against failure."
What today is the most urgent
need to be satisfied in the student's
mind is an answer to the question,
"Where do we go from here?" when
the high school training is finihed.
Mr. Holt feels that the chief cor-
rective influence lies in instilling
into the young minds a definite de-
sire to accomplish some definite
good in the world. Unfortunately,
there has developed in America the
idea that the boy or girl who com-
pletes a high school course is well
on his or her way to success. But
if they go through college that suc-
cess is assured.
Parents need only change their
opinions and the ideas they im-
part unto their children to do much
in clearing up this difficulty. They
are sadly mistaken if they believe
that there is any disgrace attached
to the fact that their children are
not of college calibre. Many child-
ren have native ability in some
special line that enables them to
make a success in the world, where
they could not in college.
It is the responsibility of parents
to frankly and sympathetically con-
fer with their children in an at-
tempt intelligently to understand
them. This will aid their chances
of success and happiness.

TOASD ROLL
TODAY IS
BARGAIN LU
DAY
Not only do you get two Rolls
columns for the price of one, but
you don't have to read Music and
Drama, unless you look at our arch
enemy, the front page. Besides, if
we carry out our plans, which at
the moment are rather larg s 4
generous and hazy, you'll also be
getting some swell ROLLS ART
LESSONS and maybe leven that
Part One you've been waiting for
breathlessly.
WHAT'S WRONG WITH THE
DAILY DEPARTMENT
Dear Pltsch,
See what I found in your sil-
ly old newspaper today:
In 1926 Dr. Hubbs with Schultz
collected several Pacific coast fish.
Now they are completing their work
with Alan DeLacy who is a student
at the University of Washington.
Menacingly yours,
PRYWXL.
* * *
Yes, and perhaps you've noticed
the FOR SALE-Students leaving
country business that we've been
bothering our pretty head about
these last few days. The more we
worry, the worse it gets, because it
seems a losing proposition any way
you look at it.
But the thing isn't all one-sided.
We found this in an illustrious lo-
cal afternoon paper:
DOCTORS TO SEE
INVISIBLE GERMS
* * *
CONTRIBUTED POEMS ABOUT
ROACHES BY LITTLE YVON-
NE FAGAN DEPART-
MENT.
All the way from Canada comes
this wee message of cheer from our
old pal, Little Yvonne Fagan:
THE ROACH
I haste to hymn the humble
roach
Whom other poets won't ap-
proach;
His flickering feet, his apt an-
tennae
Have given great offense to
many.
Yet I'd prefer him in my
pantry
To Drs. Whoofle or Elmer

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md besides, this rope feels loose."
Puff, puff', puff, puff.
THERE '
Phew! Now don't you feel bet-
ter? Aren't -you glad you came?
How do you like the view from
up here?
ROLLS SCHOOL
OF FINE ARTS
Here it is, just as we promised.
Simply copy the pretty animal's
picture in the blank space below
it, and you'll be as good an artist
as we are in NO time-or better,
if you have at least the mind
of a 14-year-old.

BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Street
Today, 11:30 to 1:30
Meat Loaf Sandwich
Mushroom Gravy
Potatoes, Cucumber
Banana Jello
Milk, Coffee
or Fruit Salad and Iced Tea
30c
5:30 to 7:30
Liver and Bacon
Hamburg Steak, Fried Onions
Roast Pork with Jelly or
Sauerkraut
Roast Beef
Mashed or Au Gratin Potatoes
Veal Salad, Potato Chips
Vegetable Salad
35c
MAJESTI
NOW PLAYING
ROMANCE THAT
WILL MAKE THE
WHOLE WORLD
TREMBLE!
LOVE SLAVE OF

THE NEW
$750
Smartest Coat
on the Campus
College men who know what to
wear and how to wear it choose
Alligator "'50"- the new College
Coat ., Alligator "50" is a smart
double-breasted raglan-long-full-
cut-roomy-full-belted, with big
patch pockets, and a convertible
collar that gives extra protection
around the neck... Light in
weight -semi-transparent-abso-
lutely weather-proof. Four rich,
original colors -Deep Sea, Tan,
Blue, Black-and only $7.50!..
Other Alligator models from
$5.00 to $25.00.
THE ALLIGATOR CO
St. Louis, Mo.

._

Kitty.
DRAW ME

I

Doggie
DRAW ME

For Quality
Final Reduction
Fine Men's

I-

Gantry.
* * *

HOT
CHILE

F Ra long time, in spite of gi-v-
tations and flaring up of dis- NEW COCKTAILS
content in Santiago, the Repub-1
lic of Chile held out against the (The New York Times)
revolutionary movement, and Pres- It has been reported that a mem-
Wdent Ibanez stated boldly that or- ber of the American Radio Commis-
der would be maintained at all haz- sion has announced an invention
ards and that there was no dan- which will give the person who uses
Sger of a breakdown either in the it a glow such as no cocktail has
finances or security of the govern- yet been able to impart. It is a
ment. Then the blow came, and now small, shiny tube, harmless enough
Chile is going back to work after to look at, but full of "kick.' Rub-
two riotous days of celebrating the bed between the hands for a few
fall of a dictatorship. moments, it prepares a hostess to
There is no mystery now about give her guests a cordial welcome
the causes for the downfall of Pres- and enables her to send them home
ident Ibanez. Chile, suffering with hilarious without the expense of "al-
other countries from the world- cohol.
wide depression, was discontented For all hostesses, wet or dry, it
by the fall of nitrate and copper should prove a boon. The latterl
prices and by the burden of the cannot scruple to offer her guests
foreign debt. On top of this, Presi- the new electric cocktail. She may
dent Ibanez attempted vainly to do want to be sure it comes from dry-
a Benito Mussolini, and the people cell batteries, but she need not wor-
refused to put up wth it. The po- ry about its legal status. When in
litical intolerance and the iron ,her turn she is entertained by the
hand methods of , Ibanez went wet hostess, she need not refrain
against the Chilean grain, and his from "taking a few" from the elec-
proud boast that a dictatorial gov- tric tube.
ernment like his was the only one I Some people are so stiff in princi-
which could save Chile from being pal that they will not knowingly
engulfed in the disasters which yield to an artificial stimulant. They
have overwhelmed other South may now be invited to a party with
American republics did not fit in no risk of blighting it. Real cock-
with the ideas of his people. tails may remain untouched at
The sudden abolition of Ibanez their side while they are galvan-
and his plans may mean further ized into the life of the party by
trouble in Chile but it is to be hoped a concealed tube in the chair seat.
that she wil emerge with her old It will be necessary, of course, to
strength and prestige restored. lead them to less stimulating sur-
--+ roundings- after a time. Too much
It's strange that inventors never electricity, like too much alcohol,
produced anything in the way of a might prove upsetting.
spanking machine except the re- -
volving door. A news story tells us that a Nova
Scotian rum runner used a nox-
You read a lot about people go- ious gas in evading capture by coast
ing to the chair gamely, but it's guards. He must have tapped a keg
never the dentists' chair. of alley beer.
If television isn't yet in use, how Height of something or other:
does long distance know when you Nations preparing themselves for

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a
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l

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f
1

IGNORE THE CHILE REVOLUTION
SANTIAGO, July 28.-(NG)-
The cry of "Donde Est El Para-
gua De Tia Mia?" which means
"Where is the umbrella of my
aunt?" sounded throughout the
Press building today as the
Rolls staff settled down to nor-
mal after two days of celebrat-
ing the discovery of Lake
Whoofle.
The rest of the dispatch is
pretty dull.
All of which reminds us that to-
morrow is the big day-Rolls' Sum-
mer Session Excursion to Lake
Whoofle, behind Natural Science
auditorium.
More than 100 students will
take the trip, according to a
statement issued yesterday by
Carlton F. Whoofle, secretary of
the Rolls' Summer Session.
Those taking the excursion
will assemble in front of An-
gell hall at 1:30 o'clock. From
there, they will be transported
by campus sidewalks to that
driveway that goes under the
building just west of the audi-
torium. They will then simply
walk in, and view the valuable
Americana-especially the row
boat which dots Lake Whoofle.
The unusual popularity of
this excursion may cause Rolls
to be requested to repeat it
next week, or maybe even cut
out all that tomfoolery.
* * *
DON'T FORGET-TOMORROW IS
THE BIG DAY
* * *
We're getting quite confused
about this serial of ours, what with
all the beginnings being different,
though very nice. So we want to
leave it up to our public.
VOTE HERE
(No Electioneering Near Polls);
* * *
BALLOT
Signify by marking X below,
which way you want Rolls'
Mammoth serial to go:
Tropical Adventure ..........
Mystery Stuff ................ w
Great Northwest............
Mad, Mad Youth...........
Futuristic..................
The Hell With It-........
Mr. Gorman has been jerked up
o the front page, so we have to

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SUITS
Tailored by

Moo-Cow.
DRAW ME

ALSO
PICTORIAL
SCREEN SONG
NOVELTY
SATURDAY
BARBARA STANWYCK
"NIGHT NURSE"

3

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Del Prete is the only real tailor
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fit at no extra cost.
213 East Liberty
Across from the Varsity Laundry

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DRAW ME

- urn -
"SHE'S NOT YOUR KIND
... my love is real, lasting!"
American beauty or South Sea passion-
flower-which did his heart choose?
.

W-
-4
oci
02

PETER B. KYNE'S
talkie hit with
LESLIE HOWARD
CONCHITA MONTENEGRO
C. AUBREY SMITH

I think that will be enough forI

SHORT SUBJECTS

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