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July 30, 1931 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-30

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Daily Official Bulletin

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Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members
of the University. Copy received at the office of the' Dean of the
Bumner Session until 3:30, excepting Sundays. 11:30 a.m. Saturday.

If

I VOLUME XI

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 1931

NUMBER 271

t

11

POLICE OPEIN HUNT
FOR HARLEM GANG
WHEN VICTIM DIES
Detective Squads Go Into Action
as One of Children Injured
in Feud Succumbs.
ONE MORE NEAR DEATH

Summer Plays: The play that is being presented at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre this week is "Alison's House" by Susan Glaspell. This
play has been awarded the 1930-1931 Pulitzer Prize and is presented for
the first time outside of New York. The Pulitzer Prize standard is: "The
original American play which shall best represent the educational value
and power of the stage." The present production is directed by Thomas
Wood Stevens.
Chorus: An informal 'sing' for those interested in High School
chorus and glee club materials is 'held at Morris Hall each Thursday
evening from 7 to 8 p.m. All interested are cordially invited.
David Mattern
Acolytes: Professor F. S. C. Northrop, Associate Professor of Phi-
losophy at Yale University, will discuss "The Relation Between Time
and Eternity in the Light of Contemporary Physics," Friday evening
at 7:30, in Room 202, South Wing.
University Women: There will be a swimming party for women
o Friday, July 31st at one of the nearby lakes. The fee will be fifty
cents and tickets should be purchased from the Physical Education of-
fice in Barbour Gymnasium before Friday noon.
The group will leave Barbour Gymnasium at five o'clock. All
women students are cordially invited.
Put-in-Bay Excursion: Party will leave at east entrance of the
Natural Science Building by motor bus at 7 a.m. and arrive at the dock
of the steamer "Put-in-Bay" at the foot of First Street, Detroit, at 8:45.
Steamer sails .at 9 and arrives in Put-in-Bay at 12:45. Returning
steamer sails at 4 and arrives in Detroit at 8 p.m. Motor busses wait
at dock and party should reach Ann Arbor at 9:45 p.m. Round trip fare:
motor .bus, $1.25, and steamer, $.75. Both tickets may now be obtained
at the Summer Session office, Room 9, University Hall. Students bring-
ing picnic lunches will be able to keep total expenses under $3.00, in-
cluding admissions to the island caves. Those who wish may join the
party at the steamer. The excursion is compulsory for members of
Geology 31s. William H. Hobbs
The Women's Education Club picnic will be held on Monday, August
3 at the Fireplace. Cars will leave the University High School at 5:45
p.m. Make reset vations by calling Miss McHenry at 4838 before Sat-
urday. Lydia McHenry
Students wishing eye refractions at the Health Service are ad-
vised to secure their appointments before August 6th.
Warren E. Forsythe, Director
Comprehensive Examination for the Teacher's Certificate:
The comprehensive professional examination required for the
Teacher's Certificate will be given in the Auditorium of the University
High School on Saturday, August 15th, from 9 to 12 o'clock. All students
expecting to secure the Teacher's Certificate at the end of the Summer
Session are required to take this examination. Full details respecting
the nature and procedure of this examination can be had from the
Recorder, School of Education, Room 1437, University Elementary School.
C. O. DAVIS, Secretary
STUPIDITY IS CHIEF CAUSE OF WAR,
JAPANESE COUNT TELLS EDUCATORSI

Intended Victim of Beer Battle
Believed to Have Escaped;
Arrests Ordered.
NEW YORK, July 29.-(IP)-The.
shooting of five innocent children
in a Harlem beer feud late Tues-
day, turned into a murder hunt to-
day, as five-year-old Michael Ven-
gali, one of the victim§, died in a
hospital.
Police Commissioner Mulrooney,
notified of the child's death at 3 a.
m. today, sent a dozen detective
squads into action with orders to
bring in every beer racketeer in the
city for questioning.
Four other children are still un-
dergoing hospital treatment for
bullet wounds. One more may die.
The victims, ranging in ages from
3 to 14 years, were playing on the
heat blistered sidewalks of East
107th St. when an unidentified
touring car rolled to the curb and
sprayed the Helmar Social club, a
poolroom, with an assortment of
shotgun and revolver slugs.
Racketeer Escapes.
The intended victim of the gun-
men, described by police as a beer
racketeer who had "muscled" in
on new territory, escaped. He
sprawled on the sidewalk at the
first of gun fire, and remained
there while windows tinkled to the
street and women and children
screamed and scurried for safety.
A moment later as the automo-
bile departed, five children were
lying on the sidewalk, hurt and
bleeding. The first two policemen
reaching the seene were unable to
reach the injured as the thousands
of residents cluttered the streets,
screaming and cursing.
Five Children Shot.
The wounded were, the dead
boy's brother, Salvatore, 7, Michael
Bevilaqua, 3; Samuel Devino, 5 and
Florence D'Amello, 14.
Police attributed the shooting to
the three-cornered beer war of
Dutch Schultz, Vincent Coll and Joe
Rao, the more prominent of New
York's beer men, Rao, police say, is
an associate of Legs Diamond.
Commissioner Mulrooney in or-
dering the technical arrests of all
beer runners, made it clear that
Joe Rao and Vincent Coll should
be brought in for special question-
ing. Police were checking with
state troopers the possibility that
city beer barons had repulsed the
invasion of up-state men who had
tried selling their wares in this
vicinity.

Screen Reflections
IDEAL LOVE
CUSTOM MADE
At the Majestic: "Svengali" with
John Barrymore and Marian Marsh.
Closes Friday. .Also Paramount Re-
view, "Masquerade," and screen
song, "That Old Gang of Mine."
John Barrymore in "Svengali"
shows the latest method of attain-
ing that dream girl you have always]
wanted. The amazing short cut is
by means of hypnotism. As a hyp-
notist Barrymore is supreme. He
succeeds very well in impersonating
a wierd character of story book
fame. Some critiscism might be
directed at Barrymore for so com-
pletely dominating the action of
the plot in which "Trilby" was the
principal character. However the
central part of the action is ably
maintained by Mr. Barrymore.
Barrymore takes the part of the
singing master in the Latin quarter
of Paris. Through some friends
who are artists, he makes the ac-
quaintance of Trilby, the artist's
model. Marian Marsh plays the
part of Trilby, and in our estima-
tion, does more than well in the
part. Under the guidance of Barry-
more she becomes a great concert
singer.
The plot convinces one that Bar-
rymore was not far wrong when he
said "there are more things in
heaven and earth than are dreampt
of in your philosophy." There are
not many thrills to be had in the
plot of "Svengali." In fact, we are
almost moved to say in the begin-
ning that it is as dull as a three
volume novel. Things move slowly
but nevertheless "Svengali" proves
to be entertaining in the highest
sense of the word. There are super-
ior qualities of drama at the cli-
max when Barrymore is moved to
disclose the dreams in his philoso-
phy in these words: "There is no
love in manufactured love-it is
only Svengali speaking to himself."
E.H.E.
Chile Plans Abolition
of Secret Policemen
SANTIAGO, Chile, July 29.-(P)-
Chile's new government today laid
plans for the elimination of the
notorious secret police of former
President Carlos Ibanez, who has
taken refuge in Buenos Aires after
fleeing the country.
Ibanez had built up an espionage
system which, it is charged, fer-
reted out personsdwho did no more
than speak mildly against him.
Many citizens arrested by the se-
cret police were exiled or sent to
island prisons.
Angry citizens still were search-
ing today for Ventura Maturana'
chief of the secret police, who is
reported to have fled across the
border.
hs

C sL3SIFI j)
ADVERTISIN
LOO AT THIS BARGAIN-Brand
new $100 Gibson tenor banjo and
case for sale at fraction of cost.
Phone 7017. 25, 26'
WANTED-By starving University
graduate, job requiring poise,
personality, and ability, compen-,
sated accordingly. Reply D-13,
The Daily.
FOR RENT-A clean well-furnish-
ed liveable apartment, of 4 rooms
near U golf course at 1339 S. State
St. Phone 3403.
LOST-Lady's green fountain pen
near campus. Finder please call
3652.
WANTED-Good cottage at near
by lake. Have desirable property
to exchange. Phone 22839.
30, 31, 1,2

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with Michigan pendant and nail
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DENVER, Colo., July 29.-()-
War can be stopped because the
principal cause of fighting is stu-
pidity, Count Hirotaro Hayashi of
Tokio, told the World Federation
-of Education associations meeting
in its fourth biennial conference
today:
Count Hayashi, who is president
of the Japanese Imperial Education
association and a member of the
house of peers, spoke on the fight-
ing instinct and its utilization for
peace.
"Animals fight," he pointed out,
"because their intelligence is lim-
ited. They lack ingenuity to solve
the problems of group life. Men
are rational beings. We must find
means to solve our difficult prob-
lems without engaging in war.
"But," he continued, "we do not
know whether at this stage of civil-
ization, we are ready to stop war.
Still we must try to solve it intelli-

gently, even by means of interna-
tional interference."
He declared the fighting instinct
in man must change its mode of
expression to the newer aspect of
culture.
Edward J. McNamara, principal
of the High School of Commerce of
New York, summarized social ap-
proaches to business education and
said that one of the chief aims of
education is social efficiency.
"This means," he said, "that
young people must be prepared not
only for citizenship but for life as
a member of a family, a club, a vo-
cation or a church. It does not
mean that all should be turned out
in the same mould or that educa-
tion should be standardized."
Attention to the health of the
school child was emphasized by Dr.
Thomas D. Wood, New York chair-
man of the committee on the school
child at the White House confer-
ence on child health protection.

Calkins-Fletcher Drug Co.

South State Street

Three Dependable Stores
South State and Packard
Cor. East and South University

CANDIES SODAS

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We have all makes
Remington, Royal,
Corona, Underwood

Colored duco finishes. Price $60
O. D. MORRILL

THE PULITZER PRIZE PLAY

314 South State St.

Phone 6615

BOOKS ADDITIONS DAILY
TO OUR
BARGAIN TABLE
of
Text and Reference Books...50c

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AAI B R'S

Vniversity
Soon ore.

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Michigan Union Cafeteria

QUALITY

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