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July 29, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 1931
=

THE SUMMER MIHIGAN DAILY Pd TEnI

WESTERN FORESTS
SWEPT BY FLAMES
Valuable Timber Is Destroyed ini
Northern Idaho, Montana;
Hundreds Fight Fire.
SPOKANE, Wash., July 28.-(IP)-
A raging Deer Creek fire in North
Idaho and Montana was licking
through valuable timber today,
with 25,000 blackened acres in its
wake.
Hundreds of men were vainly at-
tempting to quench the blaze as it
swept through mountainous terri-
tory along a 17-mile front. Brisk
winds whipped the fire from a
small burn into a conflagration
that sent human being and animals
fleeing for life.
Seven persons from Bonners Fer-
ry, Ida., found shelter in protected
mine buildings and watched one of
their abandoned automobiles burn
before they escaped from the dan-
ger zone.
Reinforcements were mobilized
in Spokane and. Newport, Wash.,
and Idaho and Montana towns.
Trains and pack horses carried
men to the danger lines while air-
planes were speeding supplies to
the district.
Other fires spread a smoke pall
over the inland empire Monday.
One, which started in a woodshed,
destroyed half of the town of Loon
Lake, Wash. The damage was es-
timated at $15,000.
In California, the forest fire sit-
uation was described as the worst
in the history of the state. A blaze
that swept Mt. Diablo was partly
under control today, however, and
fires in other sections were re-
ported fairly well in hand.
........... ACCOUNTS OF WAR
IN CHINA CONFLICT
Reports Agree Only on Status
of Forces at Railroad
Near Paotingfu.
SHANGHAI, July 28.-(P)-Con-
flicting reports reaching Shanghai
today greed only that heavy fight-
ing is progressing on the Peiping-
Hankow xrailway south of Paoting-
fu.
Nanking asserted her Manchu-
rian allies have assumed the offen-
sive and checked the rebel Shih
Yu-San's advance in the region of
Sinlo. Authoritative non-Chinese
sources, however, reported Shih
Yu-San captured Wangtu and took
1,000 Manchurian prisoners as well
as rifles and artillery.
These sources asserted Shih Yu-
San is pressing northward, threat-
ening Paotingfu, vital point of the
Manchurian defense.
Foreign military authorities ex-
pressed the opinion that should
Paotingfu fall, Chang Hsueh-Liang,
Manchurian leader, probably would
abandon Peiping and Tientsin
without further trouble.

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ADVOCATES YOUTH
GE[T PEACESTUDIEF
Penlington Proposes Institution.
to Instruct All Children in
International Relations.
DENVER, Colo., July 28.-(P)-
Education of the young in interna-
tional relations as a means of pro-
moting world peace was stressed
Monday at the opening of the
fourth biennial conference of the
World Federation of Education As-
sociations.
H. N. Penlington of Hemsworth,
Yorkshire, England, chairman of
the primary schools section, said
opinion of the advisability of pro-
moting world peace by beginning
instruction in that line in the gram-
mar schools was "keenly divided"
in England.
"On the one hand," Mr. Penling-
ton said, "the protagonists of
League of Nations teaching assert
that as we are all anxious to bring
about world peace, there can be no
sure way of doing so than to actu-
ally teach peace and talk peace
daily to children of impressionable-
age."
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-
A sign in the porter's lodge here is
reported to read: "SANDWICHES
AND TROUSERS PRESSED."

1
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f

sports Woman
Due to the unusual popularity of
the open hockey games, another
one has been planned for tonight.
I These games are sponsored by the
women's physical education depart-
ment and are open to every woman
registered in the University. They
are held at 7:15 on Palmer field and
after the game, the players are
served refreshments in the field
house.
* * *
Drawing has been completed for
the intermediate and beginners
tennis tournament and the list has
been posted on the bulletin board
at the Women's Athletic building.
The first round must be played off
this week.
SOCIETY

w r 1,
Norman H. Davis,
Trustee of the Bank of New York
and Trust company, who has ac-
cepted a post on the finance com-
mittee. of the :League of Nations.
He will leave shortly for Europe to
attend a conference of European
credits. The League's finance com-
mittee meets early in September,
and Davis will attend that confer -
ence as well. He assumes the post
vacated by Jeremiah Smith, of Bos-
ton.

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g-AVING
SPORTS w1
(Special to The Daily)I.

LAFAYETTE, Ind., July 28.-
Looking back on a three year re-
cord that has found Purdue out-
scored on touchdowns only once in
twenty-four games, the members
of the Boilermaker football squad
will have an enviable record to up-
hold when they launch the 1931
football season here this fall in a
double header against Coe and Wes-
tern Reserve.
Playing stiff eight game
schedules for the past three
years, the Boilermakers have
been defeated only four times
for a victory percentage of .833
over the three year period that
ranks with the topnotch na-
tional gridiron standing.
* * *
What makes the record even more
remarkable is the fact that in the
last 22 successive games the Boiler-
makers have not been topped on
touchdowns. Away back in the
second game of the 1928 season,
Minnesota managed to slip over a
RAGGEDY ANN
BEAUTY SHOP
Shampoo . . . . . 50c
Soft Water
Marel ....... 75c
OPEN EVENINGS
Dial 7561 1115 South University

9RLI2t
15 to 0 victory that marks the last
time the Boilermakers were out-
scored on touchdowns. Another
game was lost that same season,
but by the margin of a missed kick
after touchdown, 7 to 6, to North-
western.
* * *
In 1929 Purdue swept through
the season undefeated and un-
tied to win the undisputed pos-
session of the Big Ten cham-
pionship, and last fall found the
missed kick after touchdown re-
sponsible for the only two loss-
es, one to Michigan, 14 to 13,
and one to Indiana, 7 to 6.
* * *
In compiling the great three year
record, Purdue has won two games
and tied one in its series with Wis-
consin and scored three successive
decisive victories over Chicago. The
two games series with Michigan

Friday night the League will hold
the second weekly dance from 9 to
1 o'clock in the ballroom. Kenneth
Lundquist's seven piece orchestra
has been engaged for the evening.
It is absolutely necessary for one
of each couple to present a Uni-
versity treasurer's receipt in order
to obtain tickets for the dance.
* *-*
Southerners and Physical Edu-
cation students are cordially invit-
ed to be guests of the Women's
League at tea from 4 to 5:30 this
afternoon. There will be dancing
in the Grand Rapids room of the
League building with music fur-
nished by Kenneth Lundquist's or-
chestra. The tea this afternoon is
the last of a series of Wednesday
tea dances which have been spon-
sored by the League for organized
groups.
gave Purdue an even break, and In-
diana has been defeated two out
of three times. Iowa has been
taken into camp in both meetings
between the two teams, while De
Pauw has been handed two sound
trimmings.
Single victories have been scored
over Illinois, Baylor, Mississippi,
the Kansas Aggies, Wabash, Case
and Butler to complete the victory
roll.
In the 24 games, only 126 points
have been scored against Purdue,
an average of only 5.2 points per
game, while the Boilermakers have
rolled up 480 points for an average
score of exactly 20 points per game,
giving an average victory margin
of approximately 15 points over the
three year period.

MILITARIST VIEIWS
ATTACKEDBY ROSS
Wisconsin Educator Scores Plea
for 'National Defense
Armament.'
DENVER, Colo., July 28.-()-
World militarists were attacked by
Dr. Alsworth Ross, professor of
sociology at University of Wiscon-
sin, in an address today at the
fourth biennial conference of the
World Federation of Education As-
sociations.
"The militarist," said Dr. Ross,
"takes great credit to himself for
never asking one penny for of-
fense; he is only pleading that his
country 'put itself in a posture of
defense.' And who but a commun-
ist, or a 'traitor in the pay of Mos-
cow,' can object to his country be-
ing prepared to protect itself if
wantonly attacked?
"However, in the demands mili-
tarists the world over are making
upon their respectivergovernments,
every gun is for 'defense,' not one
for aggression. But if all the armies
and fleets are for defense, against
whom are we arming?"
Dr. Ross declared that in each
particular case the shouters foir
stronger defense assume that the
military heads of other nations are;
lying when they profess to be con-
cerned with national defense. "But
if we suspect them of lying," he
asked, "why shouldn't they equally
suspect us of lying?"
H. L. Smith, dean of the school
of education at University of In-
diana, delivered some postulates
with related questions on his psy-
chological experiments.
LOST-Lady's green fountain pen!
near campus. Finder please call
3652.
TYPEWRITING
MIMEOGRAPHING
and
A speciality for twenty
years
Prompt service . . . Experienced oper-
ators . . . Moderate rates
O. D. MORRILL
314 Soutk State St. Phone 6615

\... toLEARAI
' SAL
SHO~

4

SLAS SIP .jj
LOOK AT THIS BARGAIN-Brand
new $100 Gibson tenor banjo and
case for sale at fraction of cost.
Phone 7017. 25, 26
WANTED-By starving University
graduate, job requiring poise,
personality, and ability, compen-
sated accordingly. Reply D-13,
The Daily.
FOR RENT-A clean well-furnish-
ed liveable apartment, of 4 rooms
near U golf course at 1339 S. State
St. Phone 3403.
LOST-White gold watch chain
with Michigan pendant and nail
clip attached. Lost perhaps a
month ago. Call Michigan Daily
office.
Fi aobsonsI

This drastic reduction comes
just before our month end In-
ventory. Every pair of summer
materials is included in this
event.
All sizes AAA to C

7

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TAKE A RIDE ON
STR. TASHMOO
TO
PORT
- . . H-ROH

Lower Prices in
Goodyear s
Semi-Annual
Shoe Clearance

Bargains
All This Month at
/ Shop of Personal Service

0

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COME TO DETROIT
any day this Summer, park your car on the dock, and enjoy this all-day
sail over the great International Vghway of Lakes and Rivers. Free
Dancing on the boat. Splendid Cafeteria and Lunch Service. See Detroit
river front, Belle Isle, Lake St. Clair, the Flats and the celebrated "Venice
of America." This cruise of 61 miles each way takes you through a con-
stantly changing panorama of rare land and water views.
Port Huron, Sarnia, St. Clair Flats, Algonac
Starting this trip from Port Huron passengers leave at 3:10 p. m., arriving
in Detroit at 7:45 p. m. Returning, leave Detroit at 9 the next morning,
arriving in Port Huron at 2:10 p. m.
Str. Tashmoo leaves Griswold St. Dock at 9 a. m., Daily and Sunday; arrive
Port Huron 2:10 p. in- Returning, leave PORT HURON, 3:10 p. m., arrive
Detroit 745 p. m. FAKES: Tashmoo Park or St. Clair Flats, week days 75c;
Sundays, $1.00, R.=T. Port Huron or Sarnia, Ont., one way, $1.10, R.T. $2.
TASHMOO PARK
halfway between Detroit and Port Huron is Detroit's favorite pleasure park
where you may spend six hours and return on Str. Tashmoo in the
evening. Free dancing in the pavilion; picnic in the grove, baseball, golf
and all outdoor sports and amusements.
reading G. T. Ry., between Detroit and PortI
Railroad Tickets Huron are good onStr. Tashmoo either direction
Dancing Moonlights to Sugar Island
Dive to Detroit and enjoy an evening of music.and dancing on Str.
Tashmoo and in the pavilion at Sugar Island. Tickets 75c. Park on the
deck. Leave at 8:45 every evening. '

Every one of the business

days of this
bargain day

month will be a
at this store for

it is a month of clearing out
all Summer merchandise re-
gardless of what price the
goods were formerly marked.
New shipments of Fall stocks
are beginning to arrive and,
in order to make more room
and to start the season with
a fresh, clean stock, all short
lines, small lots and incom-
plete size ranges must be dis-
posed of during this month.

$4,s85
KIDS
REPTILES
FABRICS

TIES
STRAPS
PUMPS
X6.85

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Shoes for street, afternoon, active sports
and evening wear.
Second Floor
Goodyear s

All Sport Dresses in Shantungs, Gypsie
Crepes, an excellent assortment of sizes and
values.
$12.75

Crepes,
colors.

Water
$19.75

All $12.75 Dresses at
$9.95
White and Pastel Coats
17_7 K

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