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July 29, 1931 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1931-07-29

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMMR M CMGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. JULY 29. 1931

_. .. ihA TTT~ Q ~

'94t onzmmtr

PublsheI every 'morning except Monday
lthe niversity Summer Session by the
BoarIn Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dir.-
pathe. credited to it or not otherwise credited
inths paper and the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches herei are also reserved.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
ofice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $1.50; by mail,
$1.75.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Telephones: Editorial, 4925; Business
211214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
MANAGING EDITOR
HAROLD O. WARREN, JR.
Editorial Director........... Gurney Williams
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
C. W. Carpenter Carl Meloy
G. R. Chubb Sher M. Quraishi
Barbara Hall. Eleanor Rairdon
Charles C. Irwin Edgar Racine
Susan Manchester Marion Thornton
P. Cutler Showers
BUSINESS STAFF
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM R. WORBOYS
Assistant Business Manager .. Vernon Bishop
Contracts Manager............. Carl Marty
Advertising ManagerJ..........Iack Bunting
Accounts. Circulation..Thomas Muir
Night Editor-Sher M. Quraishi
WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 1931 j

KING COAL
IN A MUDDLE

however, widely p u bl is h e d and
brought to the attention of the pub-i
lic will more than pay for the ex-c
pense of compiling it if it will]
awaken public opinion to the need
of prison system reformation. Di-
rector Sanford Bates, of the federal
prisons, answered the Wickersham
report with the statement that thet
government has already put into
effect all the major improvemeni
the commission suggested but that
assertion indicates a mere begin-]
ning of a change that has been ad-
vocated by sociologists for years.
There is one thing to be said for]
the Wickersham reports: they cost
a lot of money but they emphasize1
the follies of modern conditions and
go a long way toward opening the
eyes of the vast majority of peo-
ple who stumble along in smug
complacency, content to let things
"ride."
---o--
THE ANNUAL
TIFF BEGINS
THAT it is-not too early to think
about football tickets is indi-
cated by the great number of in-
quiries already received by Harry
Tillotson, busines manager of the
athletic administration. Applica-
tion blanks are now being prepared
and orders will be taken after Aug-
igned Tillotson will be the target
ust 20. From then on the much mal-
of all undergraduates who find
themselves possessed with tickets
behind the goal posts and various
other disadvantageous points in the
stadium. It's the same old argu-
ment every year-has been since
the stadium was opened in 1927-
and there is no reason to suspect
a cessation of the tiff this year.
Now that all the undergraduates
who started the stadium ticket
scrap have graduated, however, we
wonder how they will feel about it.
The recently graduated men are
now members of the alumni asso-
ciation and find themselves on the
other side of the fence. No longer
will they bemoan the fact that the
alumni get all the best seats; on
the contrary, they will probably
trample the undergraduate when-
ever the opportunity presents itself.
It's all a matter of point of view,
but let's be consistent. If we believe
the undergraduate members of the
University should be given prior-
ity rights on stadium seats let's
stick to that argument; otherwise
we'll never get anywhere. Harry
Tillotson does the best he can, but
if undergraduates howl for choice
seats while in college and then
turn about and demand choice
seats as alumni, how can any bus-
iness manager be expected to dis-
tribute tickets to the satisfaction of
everyone? To pervert Lincoln's
famous epigram: "You can please
all of the people some of the
time--"

WE MUST,
(New'

RETRENCH
York Times)

ALL is not well in the coal fields:
strikes, lockouts, pickets, scabs,
reds, coal and iron police, civil war,
unemployment, misery. Operators,
slipping under financially, are not
inclined toward conciliation, nor
starving miners toward reason. But
we can't blame it all on them. If
all the operators were filled with
charity and all the miners indus-
trious, but docile, that would not
straighten out the confusion.
In 1923, the United States Coal
Commission completed an extensive
and valuable study for Congress.
Irregularity of employment due to
sheer overdevelopment of the in-
dustry, was what they found. As
against a posible working year of
308 days, the number actuallyl
worked has averaged 213 days, over
a period of 30 years. A coal mine
operates only when it has orders
for coal and when the railway cars
are on the siding ready to receive
it. Taking the United States as a
whole, there are far more coal
mines than it would be possible to
keep steadily supplied with orders.
The burden of maintaining the ex-
cess capacity and exces labor force
must be equal to the cost of main-
taining in idleness 150,000 men and
200,000,000 tons of mine capacity.
The Coal Commissioner's recom-
mendations to Congress assert that
"coal is clothed with a public in-
terest; the production and trans-
portation of coal constitute a sin-
gle service. Coal is more than a
commodity-it is a service." This
fact would warrant some line of
government action. The licensing
system would allow the opening of
new lines only when publc inter-
est required it. Other possibilities
are government regulation of a pri-
vate monopoly, or better, a govern-
ment monopoly of the industry.
This would allow the application of
large scale business methods and
comprehensive planning, and would
seem to follow logically from the
Commission's statement that "a
national service of heat and power
is already a necessity. It is ultim-
ately inevitable." The remaining
policy of struggle for survival off
the fittest has resulted in loss tor
both owners and miners, and now
threatens civil war. Will the gov-
ernment finally act? No. No sucht
radical paternalism. American in-f
dividualism shall be preserved-in"
order that coal miners may freezev
in winter, and starve.

prohibition of their own accord
made only as much as they made
on the average in the years between
1910 and 1914, they would consumoe
28,208,221 barrels of light .and 9,-
402,740 barrels of heavy beer.
If we raised the tax on this beer
from the old rates of $3 and $6 a
barrel to new rates of $5 and $10
a barrel we should collest from this
up for the loss of war debts.
source a total of $235,068,400, or
little more than enough to make
These figures, as far as we know,
have never been succesfully chal-
lenged. Yet, if they stand, there is
no manner of doubt that a tax of
this kind on beer would render it
unnecessary to levy any other tax
to fill the hole left by the vanished
war debts payments. And the only
business which would seem to be
menaced by it would be the busin-
ess of such gentry as.Al Capone, if
he does, as is reported, control the
beer running business in Chicago.l

_-0-
WICKERSHAM'S
SEVENTH WONDER
THE Wickersham law enforce-
!1meat commission has just sub-
mitted to President Hoover the sev-
enth of a series of reports dealing
with current conditions in the
country. This time they've investi-
gated prison conditions, and their
findings indicate that our present
system exhibits ignorance, cruelty,
inefficiency, and antiquity. The
methods of punishment, they as-
sert, "contribute to the increase of
crime by hardening the prisoners,"
and they agree that the prison has
failed as a disciplinary institution.;
The commission didn't discover
anything new or surprising. Any
student of criminology is familiar
with all the facts brought out in;
the Wickersham report, and Profes-
sor Wood, of the sociology depart-i
ment here, knows more about Am-{
erican prison conditions than all

- -

1
i
}
t
1
r
f
a
y
n
e

What Others Say
FACTS OVERLOOKED
An organization in Chicago called
the American Business Men's pro-
hibition Foundation has attacked
Augustus Busch's statement that
legalizing beer would help to re-
store prosperity. The foundation
quotes eleven economists, all but
one of whom disagree with Mr.
Busch. The one exception, J. E.
Madden of New York university,
evaded the issue. He merely said,
"There is nothing wrong or harm-
ful in four per cent beer," which
has nothing to do with the question.
(The Evening Sun, Baltimore)
It would be interesting to know'
the records of the other ten, bat
five of them are not listed in
"Who's Who in America." The five
who are listed include William H.
Spencer of the University of Chi-
cago, C. E. Griffin of the University
of Michigan, and three doctors of
divinity, the Rev. George B. Cut-
ten, D.D.; the Rev. William Jud-
son Boone, D.D., and the Rev. Don-
aly J. Cowling, D.D.
Obviously these gentlemen can-
not have devoted all their time and
attention to economics. They must
have given some of it to theology or
they would never have won their7
doctorates. Perhaps this division of
nterest is responsible for their9
having overlooked apparently cer-
tain indisputable facts.
Among these facts are the fol-'
owing: By reason of the Hoovert
moratorium we shall not receive
next year the $231,683,450 wec
hould otherwise have received 1
rom foreign nations as war debt1
payments.1
We are already facing, however, t
deficit of a billion dolars thisI
'ear; consequently the war debt c
noney will have to be made up outE
f the pockets of American taxpay- p
rs. i

President Hoover's sharp deman
that Federal expenditures be heav
ily cut down is addressed primaril
and ostensibly to his heads of de
partment. In reality, it is directed t
the American people and to Con
gress, being a way of serving notic
that the era of lavishness is at a
end. The estimates are being mad
up for the Executive Budget of th
next fiscal year. Mr. Hoover is dis
quieted to find that, so far as the;
have come to hand, they call for ap
propriations larger than ever, whic]
would mean a deficit bigger thai
ever. He rightly describes this out
look as most "serious." With th'
revenues still falling and the plan
ned outlay rising, there is nothin
for it but the strictest econom
Every expense that can be elimin
ated, or postponed, must be ruth
lessly cut from the estimates. Afte
the department heads have don
their best at retrenchment, th
President himself, with his Direc
tor of the Budget, will go over th
figures and cross out still more ap
propriations.
This does not tell the whole stor
of our public finance. Among th
receipts not available to the Treas
ury during the next fiscal year wi
be the $250,000,000 heretofore pai
on the war debts, and applied, i:
this year's budget, to current ac
counts. That will be like at one
adding so much more to the defici
With the declining yield from taxe
on top of this, and with maturin
debts to be met, there is every pros
pect that before the end of the yea
the government will be compelled t
make another issue of bonds, to th
amount, it is now figured, of at lease
$500,000,000. This is a most unsat
isfying way of meeting the financis
needs of the Government, except a
a makeshift in an emergency. Sec
retary Mellon has plainly expresse
his dislike of such public financing
should any one propose it as a per
manent policy. Somehow the reve
nues must be made equal to the ex
penditures. There is no way at pres
ent in sight to do this except b
raising the rate of old taxes or levy
ing new ones. Will Mr. Hoover b
prepared to lay the unpalatabl
truth before Congress and recom
mend higher taxation on the eve o
a Presidential election? Sucha
course would be unpopular, and i
would require political courage t
a high order to urge it, but it may
be necessary.
Another difficulty which the Pres.
ident is sure to encounter will b
the attitude of Congress. It is har
to lay aside the lavish habit of fius
years. Congress will be beset an
besieged by clamorers for still high-
er appropriations. One demand i
for the issue of a Government loan
to the tune of $5,000,000,000, in or-
der to make work for the unem-
ployed and to relieve the distress.
There will be many other proposals
to be generous with the people's
money. If the ordinary phraseol-
ogy of special acts is followed, and
an appropriation made "out of
moneys in the Treasury not other-
will be found there, unlessCongress
first puts it in the Treasury by ad-
ditional taxation. But that is one
of the last things it will wish to do.
Nor will it look with favor upon the
President's plan to cut down ex-
isting apropriations as well as to
oppose new ones. Thus the whole
subject bristles with danger for the
Treasury and for the Administra-
tion.
The President, however, is un-
questionably right. Economy must
be the order of the day. It is so in

private affairs and should be in
public. Germany has made a dras-
tic cut in her public expenditures.
Australia, almost facing bankrupt-
cy, has done likewise. The United
States has no alternative but to
pinch and save and get on for a
1IMA miI-nhn+rh +e 1 1irin ia. m A

STEROLL
A
TRUE I
STORY
At last, readers of Rolls, the true
story about the Rolls expedition,
which discovered the only lake
with a boat afloat on the campus.
The story is herewith presented.
*o* *
In the first place Elmer Gan-
try and Quagpq Whoofle were
walking past the Law club.
There on the ground lay a poor
little sparow fluttering but not
flying.
* * * ,
Well, they took Steve (yes, they
gave him a name so that the story
would look nice in print) into the
building and gave Steve a drink.
That didn't do any good. Explora-
tion proved his to be pretty loose.
ROLLS TO THE RESCUE!! !
Staff car No. 1 was quickly
summoned, and Steve was rush-
ed to the Natural Science build-
ing for an immediate operation.
Everything went by the boards
in the cause of humane treat-
ment of one of our little feath-
ered friends. Even the cop was
kind enough to let us park the
car while we hurried the
stretcher inside the building.
* * *
Alas, we were too late, as it turn-
ed out later. The fir imminent zo-
ologist who examined Steve shat-
tered our hopes by muttering,
"Probably lousy with parasites,"
and gave him back to us.
A kind student assistant, glad to
be able to leave the class, took Steve
in hand. One quick look sealed his
doom. "Fractured skull." No poer-
ation; no anaesthetic. Their faces
drawn (by the Pherret) and hag-
ard, Elmer and Qdgqp were the pic-
ture of despair. Steve was going.
Choking back the tears, they mur-
mured thanks, and turned to go.
* * *
Wait a minute! I can use
him." Thus the assistant. At
least, we thought, Steve would
not have been sacrificed in vain.
His little corpse would serve sci-
ence. We followed the worker.
After passing through several
miles of subterranean passage-
ways, we entered a large room,
the holy of holies. And there
the assistant calmly dropped
Steve into a cage filled with
cats!
* * *
Stunned, their throats choking
back the tears, Elmer and company
turned toward the nearest door,
which almost threw them into the
. bright sunlight. And then they were
, even more stunned. For there, in
front of their very eyes, was a small
. pool with a boat more or less float-
ing in it! All within the limts of
State Street and North, South and
East University avenues. Some one
in the University had a sense of
humor after all!
And so, fans, we come to the con-
clusion of this breath-taking cable-
gram, wirelessed directly from the
expedition to our offices, of the fa-
mous Rolls expedition. Plans are
being made for their reception af-
ter returning from their weary la-
bor. Those attending will be asked
to omit bricks and harder objects.
Tomatoes and eggs will do very

well.
* S*
THE ROLLS SERIAL WILL ACT-
UALLY S T A R T TOMORROW!
WATCH FOR THE FIRST IN-
STALLMENT OF THIS EPIC OF
THE FIGHT OF A COURAGEOUS
GIRL AGAINST THE WHIMS AND
FANCIES OF HER MILLIONAIRE
FOSTER FATHER.
Elmer Gantry.

Robert

Montgomery
in
'The Man

Trilby, V e n u s of
Montmarte, helpless
in the spell of a pas-
sion she cannot con-
quer! Blindly, fling-
ing youth and beauty
to the hypnotic fires
that sear her soul!
Why?

Ii

MICHIGAN
LAST TIMES TODAY
No matter what you have
planned on the first half
of the week:-If you
don't include

In

Possession

You'll regret it

BOBBY JONES

Continues His Lessons
"THE SPOON"
"The Dandy and the Belle"
Gay Ninety Doings
THURSDAY
"Never the Twain
Shall Meet"

I

Wi

Conchita Montenegro
Leslie Howard

America's greatest
actor and his own
beautiful star dis-
covery bringing you
your supreme thrill!
ALSO
PICTORIAL
SCREEN SONG
NOVELTY
SATURDAY
BARBARA STANWYCK
"NIGHT NURSE"

RED ARROW
AUCTION
TONIGHT
7 O'CLOCK SHOW
ONLY

BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Street
Today, 11:30 to 1:30
Meat Balls, Spaghetti, Cold Slaw
or Potato Salad, Cold Meats
Slaw, Pickled Beets
Tapioca Pudding
Coffee, Milk
-30c
5:30 to 7:30
Pot Roast of Beef
Noodles and Vegetables
Breaded Veal Cutlets
Roast Pork
Lamb Chops
Mashed or French Fried Potatoes
Peas, Carrots, Noodles
35c

Among the Best and at
Reasonable Prices

11111

FREEMAN'S
DINING ROOM
Lunches 40c, Dinners 60c
Sunday Dinner 75c
ONLY ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM HILL AUDITORIUM

L

I

bedtime
suggestion

0 " 1

MAJESTI
NOW PLAYING
ROMANCE THAT
WILL MAKE THE
WHOLE WORLD
TREMBLE!
LOVE SLAVE OF
THE
MAN SHE HATES!

EGEORGE W. PRIEHS, FAMOUS
CAMPUS ACTOR, QUITS TOWN
George W. Priehs, notorious cam-
pus actor and critic, left Ann Arbor
for New York yesterday morning.
He last apeared as the judge of
"Liliom."
"I have taken part in five years
of dramatic work on this campus,"
was the parting statement of Mr.
Priehs, who has taken part in five
years of dramatic work on this
campus.
"If I can leave any message in
your hearts, let it be this: that I
have taken part in five years of
dramatic work on this campus,' he
said, leaning out from the car plat-
form.
Then he went inside, biting off
the end of a cigar and three long
adjectives.
An exceptionally fine perform-
-a rn P fti ,r,. c o ni 0 itn h .-

A BOWL of Kellogg's Corn
Flakes and milk makes a
wonderful late snack. Del.
cious. Refreshing. And so easy
to digest, it promotes health-
ful sleep. Order it at the
campus restaurant tonightl
CORN FLAKES

The most popular
cereals served in the
dining-rooms of Amser-
can colleges, eating
clubs and fraternities
are made by Kellogg in
Battle Creek. They in-
clude ALL-BRAN, PEP
Ban Flakes, Rice Kris-
pies, Wheat Krumbles,
and Kellogg's WHOLE
WHEAT Biscuit. Also
Kaffee Hag Coffee-the
coffee that lets you
sleep.

COR
AKS

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