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July 29, 1931 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1931-07-29

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PAOB# FOUR,

ME SUA+iM'ER MICMGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 1931

PAGN FOUR IRE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 1931

Daily Official Bulletin
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members
of the University. Copy received at the office of the Dean of the
Summer Session until 3:30, excepting Sundays. 11:30 a.m. Saturday.
VOLUME XI WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 1931 NUMBER 26

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RUTHVEN URGES STATE INSTITUTIONS TO COOPERATE
(Continued From Page One) neglect to strengthen its attacks tions-the idea of professors as soli-
deals and effectiveness serve the by using the resources of its tary masters of nature asserting
public in important ways was ex- neighbors--the University of Mich- their
pressed by President Ruthven in igan and the Michigan State Nor- power over it by asceticism
the dedicatory talk. mal College. an dwill. It is a more worthy ideal
"State universities have possi- Asks Common Sense. that they keep abreast of modern
bilities for real service which have Common Sense . conditions by providing such ser-
said. "Among others is cooperation President as the important prere without sacrificing the interests of
with other state institutions en- quisite to clear thinking on the students, and by training their stu-
gaged in important work for hu- much discussed educational contro- dents to make similar contlribu-
manity Although frequently criti- versies of the day. tions, neither returning to a nar-

Afternoon Conference on Education "Our Rural Schools- Are They"
Better or Worse?" will be discussed by Professor H. L. Turner at thes
afternoon conference to be held today at 4:00 p.m. in the University
High School Auditorium. All interested in Education are urged to at-g
tend.r
Michigan Socialist Club: Prof Howard Ellis of the Department ofC
Economics will discuss "PLANNED ECONOMY-WILL IT WORK?" 8t
o'clock this evening at the Michigan Union. All opinions are invited.t
Southerners: The Women's League invites you as its special guestj
to the tea dance today at the League, from 4 to 5:30.
Katherine O'Hearn, League Presidents
Students in Physical Education are invited to the tea dance today
at the Women's League, from 4 to 5:30.
Katherine O'Hearn, League President1
Children's Rhythms Class: Childrens Rhythms Class will meet this
afternoon at 3:00 for the younger children at 3:30 for the older children.
Put-in-Bay Excursion: Party will leave at east entrance of the
Natural Science Building by motor bus at 7 a.m. and arrive at the dock
of the steamer "Put-in-Bay" at the foot of First Street, Detroit, at 8:45.
Steamer sails at 9 and arrives in Put-in-Bay at 12:45. Returning
steamer sails at 4 and arrives in Detroit at 8 p.m. Motor busses wait
at dock and par ty should reach Ann Arbor at 9:45 p.m. Round trip fare:'
motor bus, $1.25, and steamer, $.75. Both tickets may now be obtained
at the Summer Session office, Room 9, University Hall. Students bring-
ing picnic lunches will be able to keep total expenses under $3.00, in-
cluding admissions to the island caves. Those who wish may join the
party at the steamer. The excursion is compulsory for members of
Geology 31s. William H. Hobbs
Comprehensive Examination for the Teacher's Certificate:
The comprehensive professional examination required for the
Teacher's Certificate will be given in the Auditorium of the University
High School on Saturday, August 15th, from 9 to 12 o'clock. All students
expecting to secure the Teacher's Certificate at the end of the Summer
Session are required to take this examination. Full details respecting
the nature and procedure of this examination can be had from the
Recorder, School of Education, Room 1437, University Elementary School.
C. O. DAVIS, Secretary

CARTTER9S
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15 CENTS

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Cut in Wages Proposed; Lowest
Level for Earnings in
16 Years Reached.
(Continued From Page One)
salaried employees be made in vary-
ing degrees,, dependent upon thef
character of the service rendered."
The corporation rported total
earnings for the quarterly periodj
ending June 30 of $13,817,524, af-
ter deducting all expenses incidentj
to operation, including ordinary re-
pairs and maintenance of plant,'
and taxes. This is the lowest since
the first quarter of 1915, when in-
dustry was still paralyzed from the
shock of the outbreak of the World
war. It is the lowest for the sec-
ond quarter of any year in more,
than twenty years. It compared
with $19,464,836 in the first quarter
of this year, and was little more
than a quarter of the earnings of
the like period of 1930, when $47,-
061,304 was reported.
A Nebraska university is refusing
to give diplomas to students who
drink.
COLGATE UNIVERSITY - An
alumni college was instituted here
this spring.

Chile Resumes Work
Following Celebration
(Continued From Page One)
vice-president said. "Chileans as
a people now are in power. For
that reason we as a people should
put a united effort behind the solv-
ing of problems of the hour, which
need the fullest cooperation."
Fifty girl students were among
those responding. They directed
traffic downtown, helping out men
students, professional men, and
other intelletcuals who have been
acting for the carabineros. The
carabineros have not been allowed
out of their barrackssince Presi-
dent Carlos Ibanez resigned, al-
though several companies dressed
in different uniforms ventured out
of Santiago today to parade to a
cemetery and bury three carabin-
eros killed in the recent trouble.
Schultz, Hubbs Work
on Key List to Fish
Leonard P. Schultz, now an in-
structor at the University of Wash-
ington, is working with Dr. Carl
L. Hubbs during the summer in the
fish department of the museums on
a key and check list to some fishes
of Oregon and Washington.
In 1926 Dr. Hubbs with Schultz
collected several Pacific coast fish.
Now they are completing their work
.with Alan DeLacy who is a student
at the University of Washington.

cized for not providing this service, "An education," he said, "is of
they are not all or even mostly to little importance which unfits ori
be blamed. Most of our state insti- fails to fit a man for life. Schools i
tutions have not been sufficiently cannot adopt the monastic view-c
state-minded. In fact, the struggle point that human pursuits are van-
for existence they have had to ity and vexation of spirit, nor suc-
wage, inexpert, self-interested ad- cessfully escape the duty of train-
ministrators, hampering legislation ing for the professions. We often
and other factors, have tended to repeat that education should pro-
make them self-sufficient and in- duce leaders. If we mean that an
dependent to such an extent that objective should be the production
they have been able to consider of Lincolns, Mussolinis, Napoleons,
cooperation, if at all, only through and Stalins, there is something
administrative entanglements and wrong for few people can be fitted
guarantees of financial aid. by education for the positions these
Imen have filled, while many of
Sees Cooperation, those we have dubbed leaders have
"While there is much room for been accidents and not a few of
betterment, the Michigan situation them even mistakes.
exhibits signs of improvement. The
relations between the University
and the Psychopathic hospital, the "It is much more important that
Howell Tuberculosis sanitorium, the our colleges produce experimental-
Pasteur institute, and the public ists than leaders in the usual mean-
school system are indicative of what ing of the term. If this be granted,
can be done in combining the brain it must then be acknowledged that
power and materials of state in- there are fields of experimentation
stitutions on the many broad prob- which are more valuable than
lems which confront humanity to others to the human race, and it
the advantage of students, investi- becomes important that our schools
gators, and the citizens of the state. choose for their field of effort the
With a broader concept of the func- preparation of men and women for
tion of the University and of the the task of testing and modifying
other institutions will come a larger the essential, not the unessential,
measure of interdependence. featuresrand activities of society.
Visin Neded.At any rate, we hold it to be not
Vision Needed. in the away of progress for our
"There need be no elaboration or schools arbitrarily decide to return
complication of administrative ma- to an old feature of these institu-
chinery but only a broader vision toanoldeatureofteseinstitu
of the needs of society, a quickened
spirit of service, and a mutual trust ANN ARBOR
to knit the institutions into a strong
line of offense and defense against MON. AUG.
the powers of darkness. I believe PACKARD STREET
the University can without sacri-
effectiveness serve the public in im-
portant ways. It must not be over-
looked, however, that when this ser-
vice is rendered through other in- W AA C
stitutions the cooperation should CoR US
be mutual, and must be supported
by a general State feeling of con- 'MANY NEW
tions, to be satisfactorily effective.
"I see in the magnificent Hospital WORLD'S
we are dedicating today a State GREATEST
activity which gives promise of be-
coming a much greater asset to the AN-IMAL -
State than it would have been if it SHOW
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