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June 02, 1930 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1930-06-02

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TIM SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1930

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THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILYWEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1930

0

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V

Published every morning except Mond y
during the U niversity Summer Session by
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
cre-dite:d in this paper and the local news
published herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan,
postoffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $x.5o; by mail,
$2.00.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
GURNEY WILLIAMS
Editorial Director........ Howard F. Shout
Citv Editor............ Harold Warren, Jr.
Womnen's Editor .......Emily Grimes
?Music and Drama Editor ... William J. Gorman
B3ookcs Editor.......... Russell E. McCracken
Sports Lditor................ Morris Targer
Night Editors
Powers Moulton Howard F. Shout
Harold Warren, Jr.
Assistants

Helen Carrm
Dorothy Magee

Richard Hurley
Sher M. Quraishi!

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 212x4
BUSINESS MANAGER
GEORGE A. SPATER
Assistant Business Managers
William R. Worboys Harry S. Benjamin
Circulation' iManager.....Bernard Larson
Secretary ..................Anni W. Verner
Issue Editor-POWERS MOULTON
WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 1930
MORE THAN HEROISM
Trans-oceanic and trans-conti-
nental flying has been so frequent
during, the past few years that it
is small wonder that the public is
losing something of its interest in
it. Certainly the value of the flights
with various kinds of air machines
has been overlooked or ignored in
the excitement of feting and cele-
brating these heroes of the air.
Recently Charles Kingsford-
Smith, an Australian, completed a
circumnavigation of the globe in
his tri-motored monoplane, The
Southern Cross. Recently, also,
Commander Byrd returned from
his exploration of the Antarctic
completed with the aid of airplanes.
Aside from the love of adventure,
which undoubtedly led these men
into these dangerous enterprises,
there was in the mind of each a
definite desire to further the scien-
tific progress' of man. How soon
will it be safe for every man to
circumnavigated the world? It's a
tri-motored plane the most effi-.
cient heavier-than-air craft for
long filights? What does the Ant-
arctic hold that is of value to man-
kind? Is the West-East crossing
of the Atlantic possible? These and
many other questions were answer-
ed either in whole or in part by
their exploits.
The explorers and the experi-
mnenters lead the way in the devel-
opment of civilization. Do we re-
cognize them for this service, or do
we see only their steadfastness and
high courage in hazardous under-
taking?}
HANDLE WITH CARE
As has been the custom during
the short-session, the regulations
of student automobiles will be
much less stringent and restrictive

Music and Drama
TONIGHT: In the Mendelssohn
Theatre beginning promptly at
8:15, the Michigan Repertory Play-1
ers presnt Philip Barry's smart
comedy "Holiday."
THE REPERTORY PLAYERS
PRESENT "HOLIDAY"
The Michigan Repertory Players9
begin their second season of pro-
viding important summer session
entertainment tonight with a per-
formance of Philip Barry's popular
comedy Holiday. Performances will,,
continue this week, as every week
through the summer session, from
Wednesday through Saturday. The
company is offering a special sea-
son-ticket arrangement to its pa-
trons which makes its seven at-
tractive offerings only slightly
more expensive than seven movies.
The list of plays from which sev-
en will be finally chosen include
such undeniably acceptable dra-
mas as O'Neill's Pulitzer Prize
winner Beyond The Horizon, Mar-
tin Flavin's success of this year
The Criminal Code which almost'
won the Pulitzer prize and has been
secured for amateur production on-
ly by special permission of the au-
thor, Ferne Molnar's Lilliom one
of the Theatre Guild's greatest suc-
cesses, ancd4 the famous contem-
porary French farce Doctor Knock
by Jules Romains.
The production of plays of this
calibre, under the increased facil-
ities of the department this sum-
mer, promises a valuable as well
as entertaining series.
PHILIP BARRY'S HOLIDAY C
A talented ex-student of the Har-
'yard Workshop, Philip Barry has
been offering a success each year
for the last five years to the Broad-
way stage. Recently he has de-
serted the much bepraised"whim-
sy" of his earlier writing for the
more orthodox (and certainly
more difficult) comedy of man-
ners. The change is fortunate. The
mere fact of the furor over his lat-
est play, Hotel Universe, produced
by the Theatre Guild, illustrates
his acknowledged i mpo0rt ance
among the younger American dra-
matists.
Three years ago in Paris Bound
Barry brought his critical spirit
to bear on the sanctity of the mar-
riage vow for physcial honesty. It
was good sharp writing, enthusi-
astically received.
Arthur Hopkins gave Holiday a
fine production two years ago and
itto, was acclaimed. It hasn'tI
the thematic accentuation of Par-
is Bound. It doesn't project a prob-
lem-a, handle to turn the play
over for inspection after the per-
formance. Its theme-about the
way to live-is implicit in the lives
of the characters. Consequently,
Holiday is- less a problem play and
more the comedy of manners, that
is, a better play.
Johnny Case, a young fellow who
has "worked his way up", gets in-
volved in the rich but still money-
making Seton household through
an engagement with Julia, the eld-
er daughter. His one dream is to
"live freely" - which the very
American Setons promptly inter-
pret as "loafing"'. Being perfectly
frank, he insists on clarifying his
attitude but only meets with mis-

CHARACTER NOVEL
OF STEPHEN HUDSON
i.
A True Story by Stephen Hudson,
Alfred A. Knopf, New York;
Price $3.50.
Stephen Hudson is the pen-name
of a very important English novel-
ist whose identity is carefully with-
held. He has only been an acquain-
tance to a quite narrow circle of
readers. For it is a fact that writ-
ers interested in character study
over and above all else sacrifice
hope of a large audience. You can
not over-emphasize the devotion
that Mr. Hudson pays to character
portrayal in his writings. He has
been publishing books for the past
ten or twelve years that are re-
garded as long character sketches,
as incomplete novels.
In a note to A True Story, Mr.
Hudson says: "The material of this
novel was contained in four vol-
umes which have appeared sepa-
rately under different titles and in
effect constitute studies for the
p resent complete work. The author
has here reconstructed and reknit)
the salient elements in their final
form." If the note suggests that
here is contained something else
besides the author's predominant
character interest, as was display-
ed in the earlier works, the sug-
gestion is wrong. For Mr. Hudson
places character as the hub of his
novel. The main interest is an in-
terest in the development of Rich-
ard Kurt. You see him as a child,,
youth, older man, see him subject-
ively and obj ectively. The author
allows no method of examining
character escape. He uses various
styles and various methods of an-
alysis to gain his end. You view
Kurt from every possible conceiv-
able angle. When you close the
book you know him through and
through.
And if there is anything about
the note which suggests that A
True Story should be considered a
novel and the earlier works not
this suggestion is also wrong. Only
Iin degree is A True Story different
from the earlier books. It is but
more completely a novel of char-
acter than they. To attain this
completeness Mr. Hudson brought
between the covers of his book a
bigger experience. He portrays the
life character of his hero. This
means is somewhat reminiscent of
the eighteenth century novelists'
technique. But the treatment is
entirely modemn. Though the all-
life-in-a-day method of portray-
ing character is quite attractive to
contemporary novelists interested
in character study, it has inevit-
able drawbacks avoided in the old-
er method. (It is the historical me-
thod of the novel, though in drama
the all-life-in-a-day scheme goes
back to the classical unity of time
of Aristotle). On the face of the
thing is is obvious that all life can-
not happen in any one day, and
that the artist who attempts the
method must jimmie his materials
to fit the confines of the time al-
lowed. The other method has an
advantage, especially in the novel
of character, an advantage of rep-
itition. Very effectively does Mr.
Hudson impress us in A True Story
of Richard Kurt's weakness by pil-
ing up and up, incident on incident
showing the same. And, in the
"cradle to grave" plan Mr. Hudson
(escapes the "inaction" of such a

character novelist as Virginia;
Woolf. That the book is a history,
a "story" of Richard Kurt's life at
the outset gives it a sense of ac-
tion. Not that Mr. Hudson has
action of prime place in his novel,
his devotion to character has al-
ready been underscored. The point'
is that he has showed how charac-
ten and action are both possible.
Probably he has carried out what
Mrs. Woolf's definition of the nov-
el implies-that character neces-
sarily means action.
A True Story is surely one of the
important books of our time. Only
a few of the angles of approach
have been stated in this review.
Styles and incidents, a multiplicity
of them, have been turned over to
the development of character, the
one character - Richard Kurt.
Naive, sophisticated, reportorial
styles are used. The action is all
within character, though attract-
ive enough to hold such people as
read only for the "stony". If there
is such thing as the novel form, you
will find it in this book of Mr. Hud-
son. It is an individual form, a
form dictated by the subject. In
working out a novel of significance,
the method of Mr. Hudson is ad-
mirable-to allow the character to

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Terms if desired. Educational price to, teachers-

tnis summer tnan during the win-I understanding. Julia is sufficient-
ter term. This action is taken, un-,l the daughter of her father to
doubtedly, as a mark of respect for have security and well-to-do-ness
the large number of older students as her demands of marriage.
who are coming to the campus to Johnny gets tutored during his
study in the professional schools.; engagement period, being dubbed
However, it furnishes, at the u-mrcn en
thoroughly u-mrcn en
same time, an opportunity for the3 while, dominating t hi e family!
students to show to what extent ! scenes, is Linda, the younger dau-I
they deserve a modification of the 'ghter, actually the spiritual dup-
ban.If tose ttedingthe um-licate, in the other sex, of Johnny.
men session can show some degree The strwelupbwenhea-I
of intelligence and cane in their ,etorywej u e tweehny nhiar
handling of automobiles, the ad- determination in his attitude. He
ministration will be justified in ex -fnalreizshwmpsbehs
tending the modification to includeenamntoJuiisThfnl
studntsin he rofssinalscholscurtain clearly implies that a lit-
at other times of the year.I tle later two children of light, de-'
______________termined to live freely, and to love
life, will be sailing abroad. Julia
For sale: plane that laughs at 'is left to find a husband who will
an ocean. So reads the advertise- give her security.
ment for the plane in which Kings- The little family world is seen
ford-Smith girdled the globe. We with delicacy and exactness: never
rememaber several of them that once pushed or vulgarized into theI
laughed at the ocean and got their glare and obviousness of the usual
mouths full of water. popular family comedy. Linda andI
____ __ Johnny are wits: fine banter andj
loquaciousness delights the ear and
Two girls recently lost positions subtly and evasively expresses f eel-
in a Zion City, Ill. factory because ing. Barry's writing has style: the
they were caught chewing gum. only American counterpart of Noel
They'll have to find a new way to Coward or Somerset Maugham in
stick to the job.l England. The characterization in
the smaller parts is pointed and
0 !brilliant-the part written for and
Double parking not to be toler-r played by Donald Ogden Stewart
ated is the anouncement of Ann' being especially so.
Arbor's police chief, not even off An experienced cast has been as-
the main street. And that's justI sembled for Holiday which prom-
+t.a P wa v wwve at~ lwa7vs liked to park, I ises to be a fine opener for the

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