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June 02, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1930-06-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

3W3. THE ~SUMMER PMOMHOAN DAILY PG~T~I

I

'ROHIBITION CHIEF
DYGGATES REPEAL
[~aj. Campbell, Outgoing Head
of New York Enforcement,
Charges Interference.
LAMES PETTY POLITICS

Sr. LOUIS AVIATION FANS OPEN SPECIAL +GLIDERPIOR T
AS LAND)IN+G FIELD FOR FLIERS OF MO TORLESS CRAFTS
Lindbergh Made First Flight in'
Glider at Field Established r;
by Pioneer in Gliding. J:c'

Fs Prohibition Officials
4Treasury Department
Are Insincere.

inI

(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, July 1=-Maj. Maur-
ice Campbell, until today prohibi-
tion administrator for New York,
advocates the repeal of the eigh-
teenth amendment.
He resigned when ordered to Bos-
ton to take charge of alcohol per-
mits under the treasury department
in the reorganization of the prohi-
bition forces which transferred en-
forcement to the department of
justice.
His declaration for, repeal of the-
eighteenth amendment was part of
a statement. published;. today in
which he charged that his transfer"
to Boston resulted from refusal to
grant or restore brewery, whisky
an'd alcohol permits which "local
politicians-a'ld certain' admfinistra-
tlion officials in Washington feel
must be restored to secure neces-
sary support .faor the Republican
ticket in New York this fall."+
Warns His Successor.+
Referring to William B. Moss,
who has been transferred from the+
post of prohibition administrator at
Albany, N. Y., to take charge of al-
coh~ol permits in New York, Camp-
bell said:
"Possibly officials in Washington
think he can be more easily swayed
than myself. I do not know. But
I now publicly admlonish him to
gather together all his strength to
withstand the onslaught for I am
sure he will have need for all the
ability and courage, he can com-
mand.
"And now, after, four years as
one of the highest field oflucials in7
prohibition enforcement, with three
years of that time as administrator'
in New York, I publicly declare that
certain treasury officials who have
been charged with enforcemnent of
the national prohibition act, and
who are still to remain in charge
of kindred activities, have not been
sincere in their efforts to enforce
this law.-
"Transfer Means Nothing."
"Further, in New York and other
areas in which the sentiment of
the people is predominantly wet,
this transfer of enforcement activi-
ties to the department of justice
will mean nothing so long as prohi-
bition; prosecutions are left to Unit-
ed States attorneys Who possess po-
litical aspirations, the success of
which must depend upon their abil-
ity to win the approval of local poli-
ticians and their community for
their prosecuting activities.
"f'inally, after my years of serv-
ice in the prohibition bureau after
watching closely the results of pro-
hibition from the inside and after
the~ most thoughtful and serious
consideration. of. the matter, I have~
reached the following conclu n-'4
"Prohibition is not the logical so-

($y Associated Press)
ST. LOUIS-Now comes the "gli-
derport" and St. Louis lays claim
to the first one in the world.
Differing from the level airports
of, motored aviation, the. "glider-
port"-a new term in aeronautics-
utilizes hills and a valley three-
fourths of a mile- long.
The tract, situated in the suburbs
of the city near Creve Couer lake,
was selected by the St. Louis Glider
association because of the nature of
the hills and valley and the favor-
able way in which winds strike.
Called "the world's first exclusive'
gliderport," it is named after Harry
Kuchins, the city's gliding pioneer,
who first created interest here in
motorless planes more than a year
ago.
Lambert field was the scene of
the first glider flights and it was
there that Colonel Charles Lind-
bergh made his first non-motored
flight in a ship now owned by'
Kuchins and being used by mem-
bers of the association.
Wheni a level field proved unsat-
isfactory, Kuchins and other en-
thusiasts tried out two other fields
before locating and leasing the
present "gliderport."
Kuchins heads the St. Louis

University Women
Invited to Attend
ILeague Open House
The executive board of the Wo-
men's League for the Summer Ses-
sion will have open house for tea
from 4 to 5 this afternoon in the
garden of the League building. All
women students in the university
are invited to attend, and members
of Excurison 1 will be special guests.
Margaret Morin, social chairman,
will pour. In case of disagreeable
weather, the tea will be held in
the alumnae room.
Teas and receptions honoring
various persons in the University
will be held weekly during the
Summer Session. Musicales and
special programs will feature. many
of the teas.
Isabelle Rayen, '31, is acting as
summer president of the League,
and has appointed Roberta Reed,
'31, as secretary-treasurer. The
social committee, under the chair-
manship. of Margaret Morin, '31,
consists of Jessie Winchell, '31,
Margaret Mix, '31 , Ivalita Glas-
cock, '32, and Mary Louise Hershey,
'32. Cecelia Shriver, '31, is chair-
man of the library. All depart-
ments of the League building, with
the exception of the tea room, will
be open throughout the summer.

f

Nation Celebration of
Evacuation Marked by
Serious Outbreaks.

Rhine
Few

GERMANS REJOICE
AS FRENCH DEPART

EI"

(By Associated Press)
Berlin, July 1--Sixty million
Germans continued today to ex-
press their joy at the liberation of
the Rhineland.
With the exception of a few iso-
lated cases celebration of Monday's
evacuation by the French was
without disorders. ,
+Breslau Facists supplied a note
of discord when during a military
tatoo which formed one of the ju-
bilation features, they started
street rows. A number of persons
were injured and others arrested.
Kaiserslauten witnessed a se-
vere clash in which Republicans
invaded homes of former separat-
ists and wrecked their posessions,
being expelled by streams from fire
hose. A separatist was said to
have shoo himself later.
Gaiety, however, was the domi-
nant note of the celebrations. 'All
over Germany church bells rang at
noon today, as they had clanged
their clarion of release at mid-
night.

Special "gliderport" for glider flying shown with two gliders in air
(top) is miaintained by fliers of motorless craft (below) at St. Louis.

Glider association, a non-profit or-
ganization in charge of contests, li-
censes, and other activities for all
clubs in the city.

Fees are utilized for new equip-
ment and before the summer is
over the members expect to have
10 gliders in operation.

I -

S SPORTALK

jKentucky has one automobile to
every nine persons.
Last year 1,395,869 bales of cot-
ton were ginned in Arkansas.

The East made it a clean sweep
in summer intercollegiate athlet-
ics, when George Dunlap, Princeton
golf ace, defeated Larry Moller,
Notre Dame golf captain, 5 and 4,
for the national intercolllegiate
golf championship.
E
Shades of Sabin Carr and Lee
'Barnes!I A new pole-vaulting sen-
sation loo6ns on the horizon. Ac-
cording to' Dean Cromwell, veteran
Trojan track coach, Ascor Suter-
+meister, Harvard sophomore, is the
next world's champion. Sutermeis-
ter Won the I.C.A.A.A.A. champion-
ship with a vault of 13 feet and 6
┬░inches.
Three' of the world's fastest dash
men will match strides in a great
track and field meet at Vancouver,
B. C., when Eddie Tolan, Michigan
flyer, George Simpson, Ohio State
ace, and Percy Williams, Canadian
Olympic champion, meet in the f a-
mous century. It looks like another
victory for Simpson, with Tolan a
close second. Williams hasn't done
nmich running recently, and as a
result, cannot make as good a
showing as the other two.
First it was rain checks. Then it
was check and double check. But
here's something new - "foul
~checks." They are to be attached
to the tickets of all important box-
ing matches according to a recent
decision by the Pennsylvania Ath-
letic Commission.
All golf dom is turning expectant
eyes toward Bobby Jones, when he
beghis his defense of the National
Open Chamipionship at Vilnniea-

ball team will invade the East
again this year in an attempt to
shatter the Army in a hectic battle
to be staged in New York. We seem
to recall faintly what happened to
a dazed Pennsylvania football
team when the Illini traveled East
several years ago. But the army
is a tougher nut tai craek. Besides,
Red Grange is selling real estate.
Another champion was dethron-
ed when 1lifffordi Sutter, Tulane
University tennis star, defeated
Julius Seligson, Lehigh, former In-
tercollegiate tennis champion, for
the 1930 title. The score was: 6-3,
3-6, 6-2, 8-6.
a.

it 11i11111t11liii ifili 111111 111111111ilit~11111~tllifi'if1 111i IItl111 1 IIlllli t11I111l Ij
_ rr
MICHIGAN
LEAGUE
All Women Student * of
Summer School
DINING ROOM SERVICE
CAFETERIA
and Soda Fountain

t

4

GRUEN WATCHES DIAMONDS
HALLER'S

Jewelers
State Street at Liberty

WATCH REPAIRING

FINE JEWELRY

Play and Enjoy the New a nd Popular
Pastime--Minature Golf
Also Improve your Golf Game at the
PEE-WEE GOLF COURSE
Open every day from 8 a. m. to 12 p. m.
STA'TE AND JEFFERSON STREETS
A LAKE AND RIVER OUTING
Come to Detroit
and treat your family to a grand one-day excursion
on the luxurious Str. Put-in-Bay to
PUT-IN-BAY ISLAND
In Lake Erie. Detroit's popular pleasure park. Free music
and dancing in the ship's big ballroom. Four hours at
Put-In-Bay to enjoy the bathing beach, the new golf course,
and all outdoor sports. Picnic in the grove, dance, explore the
caves and enjoy the view from the top of Perry's monument.

lution for temperance in ouir form-~ polls next week. It's~ going to prove
of government, and, I now- publicly a tough grirnd-- ;and the law of av-
advocate the repeal of the elghm- eages is against it. But Jones is
teenth amendment before the' na- I Jones. H'e looks good.
tion is consumed in the- fires of its]
consequences." The University of' Illinois foot-

R{

I
I

The Harper Method Office
The scientific method of shampooing, scalp
teatments, facials and manicures', has a
patio for drying hair, and- is located at
403 SOUTH DIVISION STREET

*

1

:=0-0w-a

V

Perry Mamument
Drive to Detroit and
enjoy the
DANCING
MOONLIGHTS
Leave Detroit, 8:45 p.m.
Return, 11:30 p.,im.
Wedmesdsk,Thursday,
Saturday, Sunday
and Holidays.

Str. Put-In-Bay leaves foot of First St., Detroit,
daily 4 9 a. mn., returning at 8 p. mn., except
Fridays, 10:15 p. mn. Fare $1.00 round trip,
weekdays; $1.50 Sundays and Holidays. Steamer
runs through to Cedar Point and Sandusky
daily. Lowest rate to Cleveland via Put-In--Bay
or Cedar Point. Perfect dining room and lunch
counter service.
CEDAR POINT
On Fridays after July 4, a special excursion is
given to Cedar Point. Fare, $1.75 round trip; chil-
dren hall-fare. A stay of three hours is permitted
to enjoy the great bathing beach, boardwalk and
the thousand-and-one attractions
of this Lido of America. On other
days a stay of one hour is allowed.
) - Write for Folder

St. Andrew's
Summer School

306 North Division Street

Ages-2

to 6 years

Hours-9 to 12, a. m.
Opening Day, Monday, June 30
For further information Telephone 7735

ASHLEY &z DUSTIN STEAMER LINE
Foot of First Street Detroit, Michigan

.arge Cool Rooms BgSayYr

Big Shady Yard

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