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August 09, 1928 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-08-09

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 1928

_________________________________________________ U

Mait Ouzmtr
Published every morning except Monday dur
ing the University Summer Session by the
Boardhin Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en.-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news
published herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
office as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $z.so; by mail, $tr.r.
Offices : Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan..
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
J. STEWART HOOKER l
Editorial Directors.........George E. Simons
Martin Mol
City Editor.........Lawrence R. Klein
Feature Editor..... ......Eleanor Scribner
M'usic and Drama Editor.......Stratton Buck
Book. Editors............Kenneth G. Patrick
Kathryn Sayre
Night Editors

Alex Bochnowski
Robert Dockeray
Howard Shout

Martin Mol
George Simons
Clarence Edelson

Reporters

Margaret Zahm
Isabel Charles

Robert O'Brien

BUSINESS STAFFI
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
RAY WACHTER
Advertising............... Lawrence Walkley
Advertising.................Jeannette Dale
Accounts.................Whitney Manning
Circulation.................Bessie V. Egean
Assistants
Samuel Lukens Lillian Korvinsky
Janet Logie
THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 1928
Night Editor-ROBERT DOCKERAY
FLIGHT DEVELOPMENTS
With the two rescues during the
past week of crews who have at-
tempted trans-Atlantic flights from
east to west, there have been certain
scientific developments which have
saved the unsuccessful flights from
being a total loss and has made them
successful at least from the stand-
point of aeronautical progress.
The attempted voyage of Majrs
Idzikowski and Kubala, the Polish
airmen, was not an attempt of no-
toriety seekers to break into the lime-
light. The aviators had been selected
by the government of Poland as the
best available for such a venture.
The engine in the plane was the third
that was tested for the plane and it
was believed by experts to be the
most suitable motor for the long run.
The plane, too, was built for what
was thought to be the maximum in
endurance. Precautions were also
taken in regard to atmospheric condi-
tions, the start being delayed until
reports of favorable weather were re-
ceived from the American side.
The two aviators flew away from
their starting point with the spirit of
scientific adventure predoninant
over the desire for the glamour of
heroism. When they discovered some-
thing was not functioning properly
they promptly turned back to try to
correct the trouble rather than go-
ing on with the idea that if they did
die it would be a martyr's death.
They know what happened to their
plane; they know its weaknesses, so
that they may be remedied beiore an-
other attempt is made. They are
helping to scientifically develop avia-
tion into a safe and practical method
of transportation because they are
depending not on luck to carry them
where they want to go, but on the
most perfect mechancial equipment
that can be developed.
Capt. Frank Courtney, the English
air ace and his crew started out with
the idea of demonstrating that a prop-
erly equipped seaplane would be
practical for trans-Atlantic use. His
plane was scientifically equipped with
a Maido (which was ultimately a great
factor in their resuce), fire extin-
guishers, and other safety devices
operated by experts. Probably Court-
ney had not expected to be able to
give so full a demonstration of all
his equipment, but when he did, he
and his campanions used them well.
They saved themselves and their ship
so that improvements in construction
may be may where they are found
necessary by investigation and the
observations of the fliers.
Neither of these two crews have
been blinded by the glamour of the
limelight, nor driven to unnecessary
death by a foolish determination to
do it all or die. They have remained
faithful to the science of aviation;
and although their failure to, com-
plete the trip, coupled with the utter
failure of so many others who have
started from the European side, have
proved that as yet trans-Atlantic fly-
ing has not .become a safe or prac-

tical method of transportation, it is
through the efforts of their type that
aviation will finally take its place
near the top of the list of the de-
velopments , hich have brought our
civilization I its present standards.

DAY OF YOUTH?
An old man of 62, disheartened be-
cause he couldn't find work owing to
his age, set out to swim the Ohio river
near Cincinnati the other day just to
show that his spirit was still young.
From Florida to New York and back
to Cincinnati he had traveled in search
of work; everywhere he was told he
was too old. Employers were hiring
younger men to do their work. So, de-
termined to show that his spirit Was
not broken, he decided to swim the
Ohio river, a feat that young men sel-
dom have had the courage to try.
When he was still a young man,
so the story goes, Edward B. Roe, with
whom this story is concerned, swam
the Ohio river near Jeffersonville, Ind.
on his back and hold a piece of news-
paper above his head without getting
it wet. Last Monday Roe dared to do
the same thing again. He set out,
holding a newspaper aloft in one hand
and a handkerchief in the the other.
River steamers bothered him consider-
ably and a heavy rain beat down upon
his back, but unlike so many of the
trans-Atlantic fliers, he reached his
destination.
The fact that Roe swam the river
is not nearly so important a the
fact that age had triumphedin dar-
ing to do what many younger men had
failed to accomplish. In a day when
Lindbergh-,a. youth yet in his twen-
ties--had been the first aviator to fly
the Atlantic; when Johnny Farrell,
a very young man, had won the Na-
tinal Open GIf champinship; when
youngsters are fast gaining control of
the motion picture industry; when
everywhere around him youth was be-
coming supreme, age succeeded in
what it undertook to do.
Many believe that this is a day of
youth. It is. But they should not
forget that the world is still full of
men like Haig, English veteran, who
made such a name for himself in the
World war; Foch, the "old man;"
Clemenceau, "the tiger" of France;
Lloyd George, of England, who is far
from being a young man; and Wood-
row Wilson, who made his mark when
between the ages of 60 and 70. With
youth accomplishing more than it ever
has before, and age still doing more
than its1 share in the progress of hu-
manity, perhaps it is safe to say that
this old world is better off than it
ever has been in the past.
THE PRICE O PROGRESS
Italy has lost the lives of 31 of her
manhood. In a tragedy much similar
to that which occured to the United
States Navy submarine S-4 late last
fall, the Italian craft F-14 sank in
131 feet of water, following a collision
with a destroyer. The entire crew of
two officers and 29 men were en-
trapped within the ill-fated submarine
and consequently sank to their doom
with it.
Safety devices aboard the ship kept
alive for a time both the crew and the
hope that they would - be rescued in
time by the desperate efforts of the
salvagers. But chlorine gas, caused by
the meeting of sea water with the sub-
marine's batteries, resulted in the
death of all aboard.
That catastrophies 'such as the one
that has befallen the F-14 must occur
is only too sad and too true. It is
inevitable that when any field of en-
deavor is in its inchoative state re-
verses must be suffered before the
least semblance of perfection is at-

tained. Italy has lost, but perhaps
Italy will also gain. If, from the
shock of the deaths that have befallen
her young men, she can be moved to
devote more time and energy to the
perfection of the field in which those
young men were engaged, then they
will not have been wantonly killed.
Italy is paying the price of progress
and she should not allow the death
of these men to remain a flagrant
waste.
TEACHERS. NO SMOKING!
Teachers in the public schools of
Kalamazoo, Michigan, have been
warned that the Board of Education
of that city does not approve of smok-
ing even in the private rooms of the
teachers.
It is impossible to say whether or
not the Board is composed of mem-
bers of the Anti-Tobacco League and
as such are beginning to prohibit its
use where they have authority to do
so. That, however, seems to be the
only thing which could be considered
an excuse for such action, for it is
certain that children who come from
homes where tobacco is used are not
going to be greatly influenced by the
mere fact that their teachers do not
smoke,
Such a measure seems extremely
"far-fetched."1

_.___

OASTED ROLL
A MORA
VICTORY Y
On, the shame of it! The shame of
it! We couldn't even carry our own
office. The entire Daily staff voted
for Hoover, and after they had
pledged to the Rolls candidate, Nor-
man Thomas, too. It's nothing but
dirty politics, but we consider it a
moral victory anyway, for we fought
against terrible 'odds and got a few
votes.
At any rate, there are at least 54
intelligent people on the campus.
* * *
"Well," said The Fair Co-ed with
an exasperated sigh, "my fountain
pen ran dry, so I simply HAD to vote
for Hoover."
* * *
The American athletes may not
have won so many first places at
tho Olympics, but they had the
best scoring system of the bunch.
* * *
Now the burning question seems to
be: Will Tex Rickard attempt a come-
back?
* * *
Don't worry about whether or
not Herbert is going to accept the
nomination next Saturday. We
received the full text of his ad-
dress today, and he said yes.
We are so glad, too, for we were
afraid that he might not want It.
We are so pleased that Mr. Kojac
and Mr. Weissmuller won swimming
crowns at the Olympic games. It
does our heart good to see the names
of the good old American families up
at the front.
Now that summer school is
nearly over, and with only three
more Rolls columns to write, We
suppose that we will have to start
hunting for a real job. Any one
who wants to employ a bright and
energetic young man will please
notify Lark at The Daily offie.

}

TYPEWRIT1IG and
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O. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Aretde Phone 6615
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Dial 6442 320 So. State

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Lenses and iFrames made
To Order
Optical Prescriptions
Filled
HALLER'S
State St. Jewelers

VISIT DETROIT THIS SUMMER
and enjoy an all-day outing at
PUT-IN-BAY
A delightful cruise among the Sunny Lake Erie Islands;
a fairyland of vineyards, orchards and flowers. Put-In-
Bay abounds in interest for young and old. There is
bathing, dancing, sailing, mysterious caves, picnic groves
and Perry's monument.
The palatial steamer Put-In-Bay leaves the foot of First
St. (Detroit) daily at 9 a.m. returning at 8 p.m. R.T. fares:
$1.00 week days. $1.50 Sundays. Steamer runs thru to
Sandusky daily making connections with Cedar Point
Ferry. Thru to Cleveland via Put-In-Bay.
CEDAR POINT
.rive to Detroit and
en3oy the On Fridays a special excursion is run
DANCING
MOONLIGhITS to Cedar Point. Steamer stops one hour
Leave Detroit 8:45 p.m. Sundays. With its huge hotels, electric
Peturn 11:30 p.m. park, magnificent bathing beach and
rd sday an board-walk it can rightfully be called
Saturday. Sunday and the Atlantic City of theWest.
Holidays. 75c.
Writ. for .Fokur
.-ea e

ASHLEY & DUSTIN STEAMER LINE
Foot of First St. Detroit, Michigan

r......
i././l

Y"U

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I I", C I; I '% I l : l Q ro

STATIONERY

SPECI AL!

200 BOXES ASSORTED AT

25c the box

AH Rs UNIV E RSITY
B O OK ST ORE

II

}iQI.I ".rl1..ill .lJ l .®C/~l./111../" d i!/.Y11111J.r ./l.//,/1111./~.I/./.Y.%. !l./.10 -'-/l/---

Sue must have quit for the sum-
mer. It probably is all due to the
stuff that Hokum and Eskimoe print-
ed about her while we are out of
town. Better hurry, Sue; just three
more issues to go.
The price of cigarettes is to be
reduced, announce leading eiga-
rette manufacturers. Now some-
oreally will be able to smoke
ai carload.
We were at one of The Daily vot-
ing booths yesterday, when a fellow
came up and said that he was going!
to vote for Norman Thomas, just to
give Rolls a break. We were grieved
and highly indignant at that. We
want it generally understood that
Rolls can make its own breaks- and
we make plenty!
Not A Chance
Since my banishment from
Rolls I have miourned and mourn-
ed and mourned. Please, Lark,
can't we be friends again, so I can
get in Rolls?
Lieut. Col. C. C. Little.
* * *
Well, If You Insist
Well, Lark, since you asked for it,
here it is-my petition to be restored
to Rolls' good graces.
PLEASE, PLEASE, PRETTY
PLEASE, TAKE ME BACK INTO
ROLLS. I DON'T LIKE BEING
CLASSED WITH THE REST OF
THAT MOB YOU SUSPENDED.
Does that suit you? You didn't tell
me exactly what to say, you know.
The Fair Co-ed.
We are not a hot weather pitch-
er. Some people can work fine
in hot weather, but all we like to
do is swim In the Union pool and
drink that new drink Hokum in-
vented.
That new drink is a marvel.
It has orange, cherry, pineapple,
lemon, orange ice, vanilla Ice
cream, and soda water. Then all
that Is mixed up a bit In a malt.
ed milk mixer and drunk. It
costs fifteen cents. Mr. Swift
promised me free drinks I I'd
advertise it in Rolls.
* * *
We ought to have a contest for
best name submitted for the drink.
* * *
Will some altruistic person volun-
teer to take a Victorian Lit exam for
us?
LARK.

r

1

4

I

Here-'s some "inside stuff" on smoking
SOMEWHERE in the neighborhood of your center of gravity there's
aspot devoted to smoke appreciation. We could describe it more
fully, but this is no organ recital. The point is: Light a Camel, pull
in ua fragrant cloud of cool joy-and listen to your smoke-spot sing
eut-"Haleelooya!" As the noble redskin puts it-we have said
( 1928
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY. Winston-Salem. N. C.
Your Friends Read Our Classified Ads

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