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August 09, 1928 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-08-09

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 1928

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 1928 THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE
I I

- - - _ _ r

"MlIIC" IS OFERN
OF PLAYPRDUCIO
Kaufman And Ferber Play Is Directed
By Hartwig And Mower Of Play
Direction Class
Play production under the direc-
tion of Earl E. Fleishman will pro-
duce "Minick" Monday night, August
13, in Sarah Angell Hall. All-seats
are reserved and all priced at fifty
cents. This play is not put on prim-
arily for a public production to make
money, but to show the general pub-
lic what the laboratory work in play
production does.
"Minick" is by George Kaufman and
Edna Ferber, who also wrote "Show-
boat." Kaufman was also a co-
writer of "Merton of the Movie," and
Edna Ferber is author of "So Big."
The other plays which have been pro-
duced this summer have been given in
University Hall Auditorium, but due
to its being condemned it cannot be
used for a larger production.
"Minick" is being directed by Marie
Hartwig and Edna Mower, who are
students in the class of play direc-
tion. The cast is as follows: Lil
Corey, Margurite Cornell; Nettie Mi-
nick,,Jeannette Dale; Annie, Helen
E. Brown; Jim Corey, Earl Sheehan;
Fred Minick, Milton Kendrick; Old
Man Minick, Samuel Bonnell; Al
Diamond, Emanual Van Vliet, Marge
Diamond, Thelma Lewis; Lula, Mil-
dred Zoller, Mr. Dietenhofer, Paul
Hoffmeyer; Mr. Price, F. R. Howe,
Mrs. Smallridge, Pauline Zoller; Miss
Crackenwald, Leda Strauss; Mrs.
Lippincott, Madge Burnham; Miss
Stack, Mildred Drake.

Books of the Day

DEATH ENDS CHECKERED CAREER
OF BRENNAN, ILLINOIS POLITICIAN

The Devil by Alfred Neumann. Al-
fred A. Knoft. $3.00.
Alfred A. Knopf again picked an
impelling manuscript when The Devil
by Alfred Neumann was selected. A
person who likes the strength and thel
frankness of the German mind, one
whose discriminating taste fosters
historical intrepretation, or one who
admires the continental outlook will
be greatly aroused by this story of
Louis XI of France and Oliver Neck-
er.
As the head of the barbers' guild
of medieval times, Necker the Devil,
showed his power in politics, his in-
genuity in leadership, and his ability
in furthering his interests when he
became a friend of the King. He
gradually advanced from shaving
Louis to attending him. His counsels
were accepted and his personality ap-
proved by His Majesty until finally
Necker became his secret advisor. To
satisfy the whims of the monarch,
The Devil spent his entire day in his
distinguished company. He shared
his secrets of state as well as of his
love affairs. In fact, the astounding
blow came when Necker found that
his own young and beautiful wife
was desired by the licentious ruler.
This quite agonized the former who
already resented being kept from his
lonesome wife over long hours.

long but not tedious. It possesses
life which reflects the author's capa-
city for picturing the details of ex-
istence and the psychological effects
which are never discussed in the
historical text books but which form
a brilliant interpretation for the
novel. The mechanics, the tools of
the novel, help to intensify the inter-
est in the naked facts and incidents
concerning personalities such as
Louis XI.
Alfred Neumann, the creator of
these sinister characters, is a Prus-
sian; now 33 years of age. He lived
in Berlan until, at the age of 18, he
went to Munich to combine the ca-
reers of going to the University and
of working in the publishing busi-
ness. Neumann began his own writ-
ing with poetry. His greatest work,
however, is The Devil, which he com-
posed in Germany and in Italy, for
it possesses such a fascination for
him that he sojourns half of each
year in Tuscany. The Devil, he fin-
ished in 1925 after working on it in
both Florence and Munich. The first
publication was made in 1926 at Stut-
tgart.
K. S.
(By courtesy of Wahr's Book Store.)
Jim Tully Praises Day Of Fortune
"Day of Fortune" has in it the qual-
ity of Hamsun-streaked with more
ity of Hamsun--streated with more

(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Aug. 8.-George E. Bren-
nan, Democratic national committee-
man and master mind of Illinois
Democracy since the passing of Rog-
er Sullivan, died today.
The death of the veteran Demo-
cratic chief came at 8:10 this morn-
ing, following a coma of several
hourst during which his sturdy con-
stitution alone had warded off the
end which had seemed inevitable
since Tuesday.,
Mr. Brennan was one of the
staunchest supporters of Gov. Alfred

E. Smith for the presidency, both in
1924 when he first soughtthepresi-
dential nomination, and again this
year at Houston.
It was Brennan's suggestion that
Franklin D. Roosevelt, ever opposed
to Tammany hall, be selected to nom-
inate Smith at the national conven-
tion. Brennan, too, was given credit
for the first realization of the value
of night sessions at Houston, creating
the possibilities of radio croadcasting.
Long a bulwark of Illinois Demo-
cracy and for eight years its guiding
hand, his passing on the eve of an-

WILL RID BUENOS
AIRES FROM RATS
(By Associated Press)
BUENOS AIRES, August 8.-Re-
cent cases of bubonic plague in
Buenos Aires have caused the or-
ganization of a movement to exter-
inmate rats.
C LA:)SIFIE
ADVERTISING
LOST-Large, gray, police dog - re-
sponds to the call of "Wolf"
finder please phone 22373.
FOR SALE-Maxwell touring car '$60

other presidential campaign was re- 27 E.Huron.38,w39,,40
garded as an almost irreparable loss
by his party associates FOR SALE-Underwood typewriter in
George E. Brennan succeeded to fine condition, $35. Phone 22217.
leadership of the Democratic party LOST-Green umbrella on campua,
in Illinois when.Roger Sullivan died, Sunday. all 21850, at 707 Tap-.
and from that stronghold he quickly pan. 39,40, 41
elevated himself to a place in the na- TYPING-Theses a specialty. Reason-
tional councils of the party, able rates. Dial 9387. M. V. Hart-
His political sagacity was legend suff.
even while Sullivan was at the helm,- - -
and head of the Illinois organization WANTED - Traveling companions.
Am driving to New York, Aug. 20,
he was, welcomed to the ranks of Call 6332. 38, 39, 40
party factors by such strategists as-- 6 -.8,3,
Tom Taggart of Indiana and the lead- LOST-An Alpha Chi Omega pin,
lyre-shaped, near campus. Finder
ers of Taminary Hall. call 3022. Reward.
NEW PROCESS RECORDS

L

.ssunlight., This is the opinion ex-
thought and a careful setting down pressed by Jim Tully after reading
of ideas through precise words. Part an advanced copy of Norman Mat-
is no doubt due to the translation son's new novel which The Century
Co. will publish August 17.
from the German which was made
by Huntley Paterson. The story is

1464-Picking Cotton
American Tiue1.....................Poul Whiteman
1465-T'n On The Crest of a Wave
What D'ya Say ........................ . . . ... Paul Whiteman
AT
ALLMEND.NG ER'S
HEADQUARTERS FOR COLUMBIA RECORDS
805J AYNARD STREET

I;.-

..- E j

r. -'

IShould A Father Leave Home?

"MI

NICK"

A Smashing Hit
by George Kaufmann and Edna Ferber
Auhtors of "SHOW BOAT"
SARAH CASWELL
ANGELLM'ALL
Mon. Aug.13
THE PLAY PRODUCTION CLASSES
Tickets at Graham's and Wahr's
Reserved 50c
FINAL

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won
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M-0im il-ol" FIR
PO 01.

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