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August 09, 1928 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1928-08-09

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WEATHER
Clear and Warmer.

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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. IX. No. 40.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 1928

PRICE FIVE CENTS

HOOVER

GAINS

VICTORY IN

PRESIDENTIAL POLL

A SCIENTISTWILL
BATTLE DISEASE
FOR MICHIGAN WEEKLY
oF. 1928_SESUSION
STAFF IS ORGANIZED AID WILL
BiEGIN TO FUNCTION WITH
FIRST FALL ISSUE
WILL TAKE SUBSCRIPTIONS ..
Arrangements Made To Accommodate.
stuitmer School Subscribers On{
Friday and Satuirday t'
Plans for The Michigan Weekly for
-i aill were announced yesterday1
Stewart Hooker, '29, and Ray-
J Wachter, '29, managing edi-
f ad business manager, respec-
of that publication. The Dr. Warren K. Stratman-Thomas
Weekiy will be published on a differ- Thirty-eight-year-old scientist of
ent basis next year, although its pur- the University of Wisconsin, who will
pose of presenting the news of the battle sleeping sickness in the Bel-
University and the campus to out- gian Congo, where the disease claims
Unverswill be the same. 100,000 lives annually. The expedi-
.siders tion is financed by the John Simon
At the conclusion of its first year in Guggenheim memorial foundation.
existence last May, during which time -
IThe Weekly carried reprints of the f
Imost important news of the week VIRDL ES ANDU CANCER
from The Daily, it was decided that
Its success warranted the organiza-
ion of a staff to write its own copy:
for The Weekly starting next fall. GAINING, SAYS BRUCE
Axccordingly, a staff of 14 picked Lecturer Shows Increasing Tendency
riters has been organized and will To Control Attacks Of Certain
ompose its own copy for the first IInfectious Diseases
jime beginning with the first issueI
i September when several new fea- VEGETABLE DIET ASSISTS1
ures will be introduced.
Subscription Available "Infectious diseases are gradually

in view of the fact that many stu-
n izow enrolled- in the Summer
lession are not here during the year
ut are naturally interested in the
" -Aty, arrangements have been
whereby subscriptions may be
applied for on Friday or Sat-
>f this week, thus assuring de-
the first issue this fall. The
,)Aon price of $1.25 will notl
iged, according to Wachter,
* be paid or applied for at
Srres building on Maynard street1
a ytime Friday or Saturday.
A special booth will be maintained'
in Ange hall from 9 to 12 o'clock on
F-id-y morning and from 1 to 3
o'clock Friday afternoon, for those
w ishing to obtain their subscriptions.
Thie subscription price of $1.25 in-
eluda the mailing of The Weekly to
any outside point during the entire
schoi year . A special subscription
price of $5.50 has been announced
for those who wish to have The Daily
and The Weekly both mailed to them
durig the year, or $5.00 for those
who wish to secure a local subscrip-
tion for The Daily and a xiail sub-
scrtion for The Weekly.
Frtday and Saturday will be the
l1t opportunity until next fall to se-
,ure _ -,bscription for either paper.

yielding to control, but functional
diseases of the heart, lungs, and kid-
neys, as well as cancer and diabetes,
are definitely on the increase in spite
of medical science," declared Dr.
James D. Bruce of the medical school
in his lecture yesterday afternoon in
Natural Science auditorium. "This
is caused I think by two factors:
first, the tremendous degree of pres-
sure under which we live, and sec-
ond, the prevalence of chronic infec-
tions, such as the continous cold,
which generate insidious poisons
that circulate throughout the body."
Dr. Bruce pointed to progress in
control of diphtheria as an example
of the brighter side of medical prac-
tice. The death rate from this disease
has decreased from 50 per cent
twenty years ago to 15 per cent to-
day, due to widespread use of toxin-
antitoxin.
One great cause of functional dis-
ease is an unbalanced diet, particular-
ly too much meat and protein, declar-
ed the speaker, instancing recent ex-
periments by Dean G. Carl Huber
which indicate the possibility of de-
veloping a disease like Bright's dis-
ease in rate by feeding them on a
high protein diet.

HURRICANE MOVES TOB
WEST FLORIDA COAST
FROM DAMAGED EAST
FIVE MILLION DOLLAR LOSSES
ESTIMATED FOR EAST COAST
PROPERTY OWNERS
PREDICT 50 MILE GALE
Stuart, Fort Pierce, And Zero Beach
Take Braunt Of Storm; West Palm
Beach Suffers Tree Damage
(By Associated Press)
JACKSONVILLE, Florida, Aug. 8.-
The Florida West Coast prepared to-
night for the advent of the West In-
dian hurricane that has ravaged a
two hundred mile strip of the East
Coast before turning inland from the
Gulf of Mexico.
Approach of the disturbance was
heralded in the southcentral interior
by falling barometers, rain and sud-
den gusts of wind. With what in-
tensity the storm will strike on the west'
side of the peninsula was unknown
but emergency warnings were broad-
cast to the interior and shipping held
to harbors on the prediction of 40-50
mile gales.
East Coast Ravaged
Unestimated damage was done
along the East Coast last night from
West Palm Beach north to Titusville,
with three cities, Stuart, Fort Pierce,
and Zero Beach, bearing the brunt
of the tolls with estimated property
damage of five million dollars. West
Palm Beach escaped the full force
of the storm but suffered consider-
able loss of trees and shrubery.
Available reports indicated there
was no loss of life and few persons
injured. The Florida section of the
American Red Cross took steps to as-
certain whether there was any suffer-
ing, but no reports of need were re-
ceived up to late today.
Shipping along the East Coast last
night had recovered with the cessa-
tion of the hurricane wind and re-
ported fair progress toward their
destination. Among these was Mal-
kory liners, Algonquin which mes-
saged today that it had rescued five
men from a disabled small craft last
night.
A freight train was isolated some-
where on the stricken east coast but
little anxiety was felt for the crew,
railway officials believing the train
may have been marooned by a wash-
out.
LEAGUE GIVES SPORT
PARTY THIS EVENING
The Women's League will enter-
tain the students of the Summer Ses-
sion at a sport party tonight from
8:30 until 10:00 at the Women's Field
House. Usually only one party for
the students is given during the sum-
mer but due to the unusual success
of the one held in Barbour Gym-
nasium the League is entertaining
the students a second time. Inspec-
tion of the Field House, bowling in
the bowling alleys, cards, and dancing
will be the diversions of the evening.
Edna Mower's orchestra will furnish

the music. Refreshments will be
served.
Dean Kraus and Mrs. Kraus, Miss
Beatrice Johnson, Miss McCormick,
Miss Tanner, Miss Jarvis and Miss
Harris will be patronesses.
The system of hostesses which
proved so popular before in introduc-
ing the guests to each other will be
used this time also. The hostesses
are as follows: Margaret Babcok,
Doris Rickenberger, Winifred Lutes,
Helen Ladd, Marion Anderson, Lily
Schmidt, Olga Vlasic, Roberta Reed,
Jacqueline Heck, Margaret Arthur,
Marion Davis, Harriet Moses, Ther-
esa Johnitis, Elizabeth Poter, Frances
Fisher, Alice Sherman, Rosemary
Troester, and Mary White.

SMITH WAITS FOR
PASTOR'S REPL Y
(By Associated Press)
ALBANY, Aug. 8.-Until the post-
man brings Governor Smith a letter
from Dr. John Rhodes Stratton ac-
cepting his challenge for a close
range and free discussion of his po-
litical career, the Democratic presi-
dential nominee intends to say noth-
ing more about the proposed debate.
In a letter to the Pastor of Cal-
vary Baptist church of New York
City Smith yesterday took exception
to Dr. Stratton's declaration from the
pulpit that the Governor was "the
deadliest foe in America today of the
forces of moral progress and true po-
litical wisdom."
Commenting on the death of Mr.
Brennan the Governor recalled that
he first met the Illinois Democratic
leader, who in recent years had ben
one of the staunchest supporters, at
the San Francisco convention in
1920. In a formal statement, issued
later in the day, he expressed sym-
pathey for the dead politicians family
and friends, and referred to him as
" a warm and loyal friend."
INDIRECT CHARACTER
EDUCATION SUOCESTED
Professor Trow Opposes Formalized
Work In Character Building;
Favors Strong Curriculum
THINKS DISCIPLINE AIDS
"Character education is in grave
danger of being looked upon as a
.anacea for many educational ail-
ments," said Prof. W. C. Trow in his
lecture "Character Education," deliv-

fWO WOMEN ELIMINATED
(By Associated Press)
AMSTERDAM, Aug. 8.-American
springboard divers nearly swept the
board clean today. Pete Jardine won
the championship with a score of
185.04 with Michael Zalitzen, scoring

174.06, second. Santaika of E
succeeded in displacing Harold S
in the last two dives or the U
States would have finished 1,

ered at the University high school Samaika compiled a score of 1
yesterday afternoon, to 168.96 for Smith.
In discussing his subject Prof. Trow
The girl swimmers fared ra
first named two agencies looked upon y
at the present time as being good for finals. Agnes Gahrty and
character education and showed why Faunts being eliminated. Gert
he disapproved of them. The first was Hoffman is the only American
religious instruction in the church. left in the competion and her
He stated that many people believe in the compesionawhes
that children should have one or two the fia mew im
hours a week from school to attend i
ehurch school's. He declared this was to the rescue of the weaker
bad because of variance in principles j Clarence Crabbe, Austin Clapp,
between the two, variance in aims, Raymond Ruddy all qualifying
too few people benefited, and instruc- the finals. Here they will meet
tors are not trained and have little rg f Sweden and Charlton of
disciline.tralia. Crabbe seems to be the
disc in e. fbet in the decisive test but he is

REPUBLICANCADDTGRNS
SUBSTANTIAL MAJORITY TO WIN
OVER DEMOCRAT__AND SOCIALIST
Students Prefer Ex-Commerce Secretary
By Margin Of Three To One
Over Governor Smith
SUMMER SESSION CASTS HEAVY VOTE IN ELECTION
Sweeping all opposition before him once again, Herbert Hoover,
of California, the Republican candidate for the Presidency of the
United States, polled a total of 1,010 votes to win the presidential
poll conducted on the campus yesterday by The Summer Daily by
a large majority. The total number of votes cast was 1,405, although
more than 50 unsigned ballots were not recognized.
Alfred E. Smith, Governor of
New York, and Democratic nom-
AM ICANS WINinee for the Presidency, was second
with a total of 318 votes. Norman
TWO PLACES IN D IVThoma , Socialist candidate, received
UU I I 1 54 votes, and Will Rogers, famous hu-
morist had 23 supporters, although
United States Places Three Of Five they are not listed in the official
Men In Swimming Finals; Crew tabulation to be found at the bottom
From California Wins of the page.

Of the total of 1,010 votes cast for
Hoover, 703 were cast by men and 307
by women. In the case of Smith, 229
men voted for the New York gover-
nor while 89 women cast their vote
for him. Of the 54 votes Thomas re-
ceived, 46 were cast by men and 8
by women. Will Rogers derived his
support entirely from men.
Hoover's Votes Classified

Egypt According to the classification of
mith the voters, 101 faculty men voted for
TnitedHoover, 455 graduate students sup-
ported the California, 387 regular stu-
2, 3. dents favored Hoover, and 67 votes
72.46 of h~s total were unclassified.
f In the case of Smith, 38 faculty men
ather voted for him, 94 graduate students
semi- favored the New Yorker, 161 regular
Jane students cast their ballots in his
trude I'avor, while 25 votes of his total of
girl 31S were unclassified. Figures show
hope that more regular students than grad-
uate students favored Smith, while

came
sex,
and
for
Arne
Aus-
best
rated

I AM TRAMCK SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
P LA Y S HERE IN ORIGINAL CONCERT

ae ot er corm or instruction wnien
he said he did not believe in was spec-
ial classes In character education in
the school. He did not favor this
because there are too many courses
now, it would duplicate materials, be-
come formalized, and the results have
not proved to be successful.
Prof. Trow said he did favor a
system of indirect instruction in char-
acter and morals. He would have this
done in conjunction with the other
sourses. The part of the administra-
tion in such a program is to see that
the morale of the school is high, clas-
sify the pupils, and to handle the dis-
ciplinary problems. He said thef cur-
riculum should build up the right at-
titudes in a systematic, rather than a
desultory way.
In conclusion he gave the following
"don'ts": don't introduce the program
in opposition to the teachers, don't
start until after a year of study of
the details of the plan.

as an extreme outsider for Borg
seems to have the championship
cinched.
The one hundred meter breast
stroke championship should go to
either George Kogac or Walter Lofer
and the United States is regarded as
a certain winner of fifteen Olympic
points with George Wyatt likely to
help along the cause some more.
Japan scored its first Olympic vic-
tory when Suruga defeated Rada-
macher of Germany, world's record
holder in the 200 meter breats stroke
competition. The United States was
not represented in the semi-finals of
this event.
The United States water polo out-
fit has an outside chance to win third
place. Malta was defeated 10 to 0,
but it must be said that for men.
born and reared on a sea swept little
island, the Maltese played very poor
water polo.

'the opposite was true in the case of
Hoover.
Thomas Gets Fifty-Four
In the case of Thomas, his total of
54 votes included 5 members of the
faculty, 13 graduate students, 31 reg-
ular students and 5 unclassified votes.
One interesting phase of the poll
is the fact that very nearly the same
percentage of votes were cast, pro-
f portinately, considering the number
of students enrolled in the Summer
Session, "as were cast during the reg-
ular session, when a vote of slightly
~less than 4,000 was cast with the
attendance approximatelysat 10,000.
The Hoover victory was no sur-
prise in view of the fact that he,
won by a large majority at the pool
conducted by The Daily last March,
although Smithtreceived the vote of
the Democrats at that time.
RUFUS TO SPEAK
THIS AFTERNOON

A Re iw, By Miriam C. Mitchell
The cocert presented last night
by the :"amtramck High School sym-
pLieny orchestra was both interesting
and un ue, interesting in presenta-
tion a d unique in the personnel of
the players. The orchestra is, made
; of Junior and Senior High school
students, ranging from eleven to sev-
ei.een yVrs of age, with the younger
pre donmicing. In the light of these
fact< the concert they presented to
, ~through unfinished in many ways,
wa4 creditable, demanding our praise
Syv-el- as our interest. Another uni-
W1, and surprising feature was the
arg'ngement of the instruments on
the platform, and though we were in-
elin d to regard the departure from
rthe accepted form as an eccentricity
on he part of the conductor, Steacy
Hn Yes, we were almost convinced
tha-j perhaps it was not so bad after
a L At ieast we must admit that the
vio us were heard much better than
the less optimistic members of the
audI unce expected them to be heard.
T e p,, formance of the orchestra
aa t4. whole was outstanding in the

fortissima and stacotto parts, while
in the pianissimo the players were
inclined to lag behind and get out
of time and tune. There were some
excellent bits of interpretation in the
Children's Suite from Kinderscenen,
by Schumann, the Hunting Song be-
ing especially good. The Bach "Ga-
votte and Musette," though blurry in
spots, was good on the whole. George
Bednar, trumpeter, distinguished him-
self in his almost faultless solo work.
His solos in the group of old English
songs was one of the best parts of
the concert.
The March of the Priests by Men-
delssohn was the outstanding num-
ber of the program. In it the players
forgot everything but the martial!
strains of the number, and as a re-
sult gave us a really vivid and mast-
erful interpretation. They repeated
it for an encore, playing without any
direction, thereby proving that high
school directors have just cause for
saying that the students watch their
music, not their conductor. This is
one case, however, in which there was
no cause for alarm.

TABULATION O F RESULTS
OF CAMPUS POLL

Hoover
Male ................ 703
Female ..............307
Total...........1,010

Smith
229
89
318

Thomas
46
8
54

Spectrum analysis, its development
from the time of Sir Isaac Newton,
its contributions to the study of the
sun, stars, and nebulae, and the light
it throws on atomic structure will be
topics considered by Prof. W. Carl
Rufus of the astronomy department
in his illustrated lecture entitled
"What the Spectrum Reveals" to be
given at 5 o'clock this afternoon in
Natural Science auditorium. A spec-
trum is defined as the series of bands
of refracted light obtained by passing
sunlight through a prism.
IASEBALL SCORES
(By Associated Press)
American League
No games scheduled.
National League
New York 10, St. Louis 5.
Pittsburgh 4, Brooklyn 3.
Philadelphia 4, Chicago 3.
Boston 6-12, Cincinnati 3-1.

Classification of Voters
Faculty ... . ............101
Graduate Students .........455
Regular Students........387
Unclassified .............67

38
94
161
25

5
13
31
5

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