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August 02, 1928 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1928-08-02

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PAGE TWO

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 1928

U I

1141, *nMuur
Published every morning except Monday dur-
ng the University Summer Session by the
Board in Control of Student Publications.
The Associated Press is exclusively en.
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news
published herein.
Entered at the Ann Arbor, Michigan, post-
1ffice as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier, $z.5o; by mail, $1.75.
Offices: Press Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. .
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4926
MANAGING EDITOR
J. STEWART HOOKER
Editorial Directors.........George E. Simons
Martin Mol
City Editor...............Lawrence R. Klein
Fl'esure Editor..............Eleanor Scribner
Music tid Drama Editor......Stratton Buck
Books Editors'...........Kenneth G. Patrick
Kathryn Sayre

Night Edito
Alex Bochnowski
Robert Dockeray
Howard Shout
Reporters
Margaret Zahm
Isabel Charles

rs
Martin Mol
George Simons
Clarence Edelson
Robert O'Brien

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
RAY WACHTER
Advertising...............Lawrence Walkley
Advertising.................Jeannette Dale
Accounts..,................ Whitney Manning
Circulation.................Bessie V. Egelafe
Assistants
Samuel Lukens AssisLantsLillian Korvinsky
Janet Logic
THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 1928
Night Editor-J. S. HOOKER

minished, if not done away with en-
tirely. What, are these causes?
First among them isthe home. Does
that sound like blasphemy? The boy
goes out to the neighbor's back 'for-
ty" and "hooks" a luscious water.
melon. He is caught, and sent tC
the family tribunal for punishment
and correction. Does he get it? You
know the answer. A fond father re-
gales him with stories of his owr
watermelon and chicken-stealing es-
capades, cautions him about getting
caught next time, and sends him tC
bed. Is the boy to be blamed if he
ends up in the penitentiary? It is
all "bosh" to say that every Amer-
ican boy is born with a knowledge
of right and wrong. If he doesn't get
it at home he never will, and slip-
shod home training is today respon-
sible for a large amount of juvenile
delinquency.
Another cause is ythe school, right
up to the university. Many teachers,
there are exceptions, feel insulted if
you inquire as to what they are doing
to improve the morals of their charg-
es. Yet now, for many hours of the
Aay, the school must take the place
of, the home. Haven't we a right to
expect that it will spend a little time
on the moral training of the child?
And psychologists have shown us that
punishment is not enough. A grow-
ing boy wants to know why he 'should
not take Bill's pencil, and if he does
not learn from someone, he'll end up
in the cell next to the other boy.
The church is another contribut-
ing cause, with its incessant wrang-
ling over creed and jumbled dogma.
When the church learns again that
its main purpose on earth is to preach
the simple moral doctrines of Jesus
Christ, and let theology alone, then
our youngsters will get some of the
ideas they should have.
These are hard facts to face, but
true, nevertheless. Few men are born
crooks. They learn the trade when
they are boys. And in nearly every
case it starts with a simple theft or
evasioi of the law that society is too
blind to rebuke.
It is true that our legal proceedure
is antiquated, our police forces in-
adequate; but when we, a's parents,
or teachers, or churchpeople, do our
work correctly, then we can start on
the law. And not until we have clean-
ed our own Augean 'stables first.

s
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TEDROLL
HURRAH!
NOW WE
KNOW

All summer long we have been
wondering just what there is to do-
if any-in Ann Arbor during the hot
season. And then, 1o and behold, Dr.
robert Hannah, of the public speak-
ing department, comes forth (or was
it fifth?) with his dissertation on the
benefits of spending the summer
months in Ann Arbor. Order a bou-
quet of roses for Dr. Hannah!
s * s
Closer attention to the said disser-
tation reveals the fact that the ad-
vantages of the Summer Session are
twofold. First, he says, it offers a
place where intensive study, and
graduate and research work can be
carried on. That still leaves nothing
to do. Regular students never heard
of the term "intensive study," let
alone practice it; and the only re-
search work that is carried on is that
of trying to find something to do.
And that often takes one out of town.

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14W

Orive to Detroit and
enjoy the
DANCING
MOONLIGHTS
Leave Detroit 8:45 p.m.
Return 11:30 p.m.
Fare: Wednesday and
Thursday, 50c.
Saturday, Sunday and
Hiolidays, 75c.

On Fridays a special excursion is run
to Cedar Point. Steamer stops one hour
Sundays. With its huge hotels, electric
park, magnificent bathing beach and
board-walk it can rightfully be called
the Atlantic City of the West,
Wri*for FbMd

PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS

Corona, Remington, Underwood,
Royal
Black and Colored Duco Finishes
O. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade Phone 6615

VISIT DETROIT THIS SUMMER
and enjoy an all-day outing at
PUT-IN-BAY 4
A delightful cruise among the Sunny Lake Erie Islands;
a fairyland of vineyards, orchards and flowers. Put-In-
Bay abounds in interest for young and old. There is
bathing, dancing, sailing, mysterious caves, picnic grovets-
and Perry's monument.
The palatial steamer Put-In-Bay leaves the foot of First
St. (Detroit) daily at 9 a.m. returning at 8 p.m. R.T. fares:
$1.00 week days. $1.50 Sundays. Steamer runs thru to
Sandusky daily making connections with Cedar Point
Ferry. Thru to Cleveland via Put-In-Bay.
CEDAR POINT

* * *

i

I

But theei, Dr. Hannah admits
that when lhe says that the UnI-
sity offers a great many special
functions which take one to
points of interest. No elabora-
tion needed there.

ASHLEY & DUSTIN
Foot of First St.

STEAMER LINE
Detroit, Michigan

i-I I_ ,.-- YYY YVIYYa -

GOLDEN RULE DRIVING
A feat as ingenious as it is novel
is now being undertaken by the To-
ledo Blade, leading newspaper in the
nearby city. What is known as a
Golden Rule driving campaign, wit
a message of consideration and cour-
tesy for "the other Xfellow" when driv-
ing an automobile, is being conduct-
ed. In keeping with the plan's of the
campaign, an automobile labelled
"The Golden Rule Car" is driven
about the city every day this week
with the idea of furthering the spirit
of Golden Rule driving and making
driving safer for those at the wheel
and pedestrians alike.
The idea is, of course, that with r
good example to follow, automobile
drivers are going to take more pre-
cautions when operating their own
cars and consequently consider the
ultimate safety of everyone on the
street, Coming as it does, at a time
when automobile accidents are more
numerous than ever before, perhap's
even on the increase, the campaign
is highly significant and commenda-
ble. The fact that the lives of 82
children have been snuffed out by
automobile accidents in. Toledo dur-
ing the past six and one-half years,
is surpassed in importance only by
the fact that such conditions prevail
throughout the country. There is a
very great need for just such fore-
sight )and good judgment, and The To-
ledo Blade has set a splendid exam-
ple to follow, one which newspapers
in other cities would do well to sit
up and consider. The campaign is
aimed primarily at drivers, but it
could quite easily have a more far-
reaching influence if the attention
which it has attracted would serve to
motivate such a movement in other
localities.
In cities of such siZe as Toledo,
Detroit, Chicago, ,and the like, condi-
tions are not such that restrictive
measures similar to the automobile
ban which is enforced on the campus
in Ann .Arbor can be effected. On
the other hand, The Toolo Blade has
led the way in showing what can be
done toward taking extra driving pre-
cautions, and it is to be highly com-
mended ifor doing an inestimable
good.
WHENCE CRIME
"Law is but one agency of social
control," says Dean Roscoe Pound of
Harvard Law School in the Christian
Science Monitor of recent date. "In
the background, home training, re-
ligion, education, and the opinion of
one's neighbors-operate continually
to con'strain the sort of conduct re-
quired by life in civilized society."
The Dean is undoubtedly right. We
Americans are too prone to look at
law and the courts to solve our prob-
lems of crime. We expect the police
to protect our homes and lives from
the ravages of crooks and gangs, and
this they should do.
But what about the cause of all
this. Is it natural for young lads in
their teens to hold up mail trains,
or "bobbed hair bandits" to relieve
the unsuspecting wayfarer of his roll
The cynic says, "Yes." In his view
it is a necessary part of civilization,
not to be condoned, but neither can
it be eradicated. But the thinker,
who is honest with himself and his
country, believes it is all due to cer-
ain, causes: causes that can be di-.

* * *

CLASSIFIED ADS PAY

I Editorial Comment
"COLLEGIATE" MOVIES
Every time we see one of the us-
ual type of college movies, in which
3 the weakling student turns out to be
a great athlete and is immediately
- the idol of all the co-eds and the de-
sirable prospect of all the fratern-
ities, we stroll home musing disgust-
edly that it is from such misrepre-
sentative pictures that off-the-campus
people get their impressions of col-
lege life. Mingled with our disgust
is the inward satisfaction that univer-
sity life is not the least bit like that
portrayed by the offending cinema,
but still that is only a personal sat-
isfaction and does not alleviate the
fact that from such misrepresentative
movies and trashy novels, the public
thinks college is the place to drink
strong liquors, go to necking parties,
or rise to fame in a day by displaying
hidden athletic prowess. And the
whole trouble is that the movie-going
public actually believes that univer-
sity people act that way.
A college movie has never been
known to show a classroom or a lab-
oratory filled with students working.
And while this omission isn't made
necessarily to intimate that students
don't do school work, the average
movie fan forgets that there are
scholastic activities at a university,1
and illogically although naturally
gets the idea that college is all foot-
ball games, confectionery shops, and
dances.
Just as there haas been a need for
a Great American Novel, there is also
a place for a Great College Movie de-
picting college life as it really is. It
shouldn't be difficult for a moving
picture organization to film either-
find a simple plot and film its action
on a large state university campus, I
subordinating the plot to the actual
showing of college lifeyas it is.
It would be a highly interesting
and gratifying film to watch.
-Daily Illini.
The newspapers of late tell us that
"Gentleman Gene" Tunney has retir-
ed. Now, when he announces itl
about three more times, and fights
four, then we will believe him.
An official at the Olympics the
other day, so the story goes, struck
one of the gatekeepers. Maybe he
thought he was entered in the box-
ing tournament for his country.
A straw vote is useful in showingt
.which way the draft is blowing.

It is further granted that a larger
cultural background is open to stu-
dents here. But the sad part about
that is that too few students are able
to find the door that opens to it.
* * *
Wait, however! The grand climax
comes when it is suggested that the
Rockford plays offer much in the way
of entertainment and divertisment.
That is too much. Mere mention of
said plays is sufficient concession
that there is nothing else to do dur-
ing the summer months.
FLASH: EXAM WEEK
SCHEDULE ANNOUNCED!
The Toasted Rolls welfare bureau,
after a hot and heavy conference,
hereby submits its revised schedule
for exam week.
Classes which meet in Detroit at
4 a. m. will hold a reunion and ex-
amination February 30, 1921; exams
for those irregular classes that meet
anytime the class gets there will be
held at the usual time, at Saunder's
Canoe Livery. All botany examina-
tions will be held yesterday out on
the boulevard. Examinations for
high class will be held under the aus-
pices of next year's J-hop committee
sometime, while classes that never
meet will be examined by the Rolls
Liscense Bureau upon request at the
Muskegon office where Lark seems
to spend most of his time.
* * *
NEW SERVICE OFFERED
IT IS RUMORED that the uniform-
ed rider of the -iron horse, who
casually interfers with a joy ride now
and then, is being relieved of part
of his duties by a private detective.
It is alleged thatn a man with a name
that sounds something like Lumbago,
has recently completed a correspond-
ence course in detective work and the
degree of B.D. (Bachelor of Detec-
tivity) and is now ready for what-
ever the students have to offer in the
'way of phantom drivers.
* * *
Headline-RECORD IS SET FOR
AMOUNT OF STUDENTS LOANS
We are led to believe that the fig-
ure of $119,000, the amount reported,
would look like the price of a lemon
coc if they could get an accurate
check on the amount of money out-
standing in fraternity houses. That
WOULD be a record.
* #**
Now that Lark is out of town
for the rest of the week perhaps
we'll get a chance to get ac-
quainted with sweet Sue who has
been so awfully chummy with'
him this summer. Now about a
'letter for u, Suet
# * *
A Chicago girl won the women's
100 metre dash in the Olympics the
other day. She probably got her
training chasing bullets.
* *#
August 17 is approaching. It can't
be long now until we can come back
and try to get eligible after a big
summer of nature study.
HOKUM AND ESKDIMOE

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0D1928, I Ro1.kenolds' Tobcce.

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