100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 02, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1928-08-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 1928

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

OVATION GIVEN NOBILE
ON ARRIVAL IN ROME
General And Five Other Survivors
Make Triumphal Progress
Through Italy
TWO LEFT IN HOSPITAL
(By Associated Press)
ROME, August 1.-With the cheers
of their countrymen ringing in their
ears, General Umberto Nobile and
five other survivors of the Italia were
in Italy today while the nation re-
joiced over their having been snatch-
ed from death in the Arctic.
Women wept and threw flowers in
the path of the survivors when they
reached Rome in the special car
which had brought them from Nar-
vik, Norway. Two of the rescued men
did not return to Italy, Captain Al-
berto Mariano being left behind in a
hospital in Narvik recovering from
the amputation of his foot and Pro-
fessor F. Behounek returning to his
native Czechoslovakia.
General Nobile and his companions
were received almost with royal hon-
ors by Prince Ludovico Pentenziani,
governor of Rome, and other high
officials in the room of the railway
station reserved for the king and his
family.
When they came out on the street,
the crowd went wild and broke
through the lines of police and cara-
bineers. Scores of women embraced
the explorers. The automobiles bear-
ing them were only able to proceed
at the speed of a slow walk toward
the men's homes.
General Nobile appeared tired and
his face showed plainly the hard-
ships he had undergone. His com-
panions, with the exception of Radio
Operator Giuseppi Giagi, looked the
worse for their experiences.
MIMEOGRAPHINd
A Specialty for Twenty
Years
Prompt Service 'Moderate Rates
O. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade Phone 6615
,fee
1EUROPF)EiI

W B hooks of the Day *

AN INDIAN JOURNEY, by Walde-
mar Bonsels; 1928; Albert and
Charles Bon1; 273 pages; four dol-
lars.
* * *
Choice of Bonsels' book for the fea-
ture of July by the Literary Guild
could not have been a very great feat
of selection. From the luxurious
binding to Harry Brown's ilustrations
it is a work that strikes home alike
to the reader and the collector, sup-
plying surcease for amboyant cov-
ers and worse lines to those who are
a bit "choosy," as the saying goes.
Waldemar Bonsels, a German by
birth, is more the south German by
custom and mind than he is anything
savoring of Prussian. His are the
dreams and the music of a continent,
not the detached and cold observa-
tions we are taught to expect from
his countrymen. His English, whether
translated or not, is the free speech
of a cultured mind, unhampered by
the awkward mannerisms of one un-
accustomed to the country. He is the
one standing alone among the great
host of present-day travel-writers
who has- really created something
from what he has experienced. The
others have run the gamut of report-
ing and falsifying; his statements
cannot be challenged, for they are
not out of India alone-they are out
of India and Bonsels. And he who
would challenge them must challenge
the man himself, something utterly
ridiculous in the realm of letters.
Trader Horn, via the pen of the
philanthropic Mrs. Lewis, might have
touched upon the greatness in this
book, might have captured somewhat
of its charm, had he not been screen-
ed by the great spouting of publicity
.......

and hokum which was both stupid
and tiresome. But this is a question
of elementals, the Trader is a concoc-
tion and "An Indian Journey" is a
true pen-child. Let them be kept up-
on separate shelves if the owner will
keep his conscience untrammeled.
The nudge of a dog crawling under
mosquito netting, and Bonsels is
awakened in the stifling Indian night
to behold on the floor beside his bed
a battle that is as gripping as any
ever fought in the world of nature.
In the streaming tropical moonlight
a handful of scrawny cats make a
last stand against an army of hun-
gry rats; blood flows and battle bed-
lam fills the air, until suddenly a cold
finality is thrown upon the scene as
a dreaded Indian cobra glides from
under the bed to put finale on the
scene. On another night, his head in
a pool of overturned palm wine on
the table of his bungalow porch, the
author talks of life and the Jungle
with Huc, the monkey, and is worsted
by his forest friend. On still an-
other night in Bombay he falls into
one of the purest, strangest and yet
most sensuous amorous adventures.
ever penned, and the memory of it
comes back upon him later as he
struggles through the close, green
Jungle, overpowered by fever and
beset by dangers on every hand. This
must be India the ancient, for it ap-
peals through the senses of another,
and not through his automatic and
camera-like observations. This is no
travel-book. Its pages breathe exis-
tence and living, and over the whole
is spread that mantle of mystery and
haunting darkness that typifies India
today, despite the ravages of civiliza-
tion.
-K. e. P.

WOULD SUCCEED
GOVERNOR SMITH
'445. r ti { :" . : :, :
Peter G. Ten Eyck
Of Albany, who recently announced
his candidacy for governor of New
York to succeed Gov. Alfred E. Smith.
He is a Democrat.

Sport Briets
U. S. TEAM WINS ONE )IATCH
AMSTERDAM, Aug. 1-Allie Morri-
son, of the University of Illinois, was
the only American to win a title in
the Olympic wrestling finals, although
the United States had entries in six
of the seven final bouts.
Bob Hewitt, University of Michi-
gan, was defeated in the 123 pound
class by Makinen of Finland, while
Ed Gteorge, Wolverine heavyweight,,
was runner-up to Richtoff of Sweden
in the unlimited division.
1RtOAL IS LE)ADINt,
PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 1-Frank
Brokl, of St. Paul led the field today
for the national public links golf
championship tournament being held1
here. In his first 18 holes yesterday,
Brokl registered a 75, three strokes
below Samuel Graham. of Pittsburgh.
MANY ENTER TOURNEY
Final plans for the second annual
Ann Arbor city golf tournament were
completed at a meeting of the gen-
eral committee held Tuesday night,1
and it is expected that 300 golfers
will compete in the tourney which
will be held at the Barton Hillsl
Country Club from Aug. 13 to Aug.
18.

C IASSIFIE
LOST-Alpha Gamma Delta pin be-
tween 1332 Geddes and University
Hall. Finder call 3022. Reward.
TYPING--Theses a specialty. Reason-
able rates. Dial 9387. M. V. Hart-
suff.
SITUATION WANTED-High school
girl will care for children, after-
noon or evening. Dial 9758.
CLOSE IN-West side, on bus line,
3 and 4-room apartments, furnished
atnd unfurnished; newly decorated;
large airy rooms, private bath and
private furnace. $45 and $50 per
month. Dial 116, ask for 732-F3.
F6R SALE--Radio in cabinet. Call
21868. 32-33-34

FOR RENT-Two furnished apart-
ments. Also one large double room
and one single room. Teachers,
nurses or business people. Available
now. Dial 8544. 422 E. Washington.
31-32
F'OR SALE-Day bed (single), dishes,
kitchen utensils, bookcases, floor
lamp. Dial 21868. 32-33-34
LOST-Gold ring with green stone
near north side of campus. Call
Dabney, 3526. Reward. 33-34-35
1F'OR RENT-930 Dewey, room for
next academic year. Steam heat.
Quiet. Reasonable. Phone 5035.
33

Trueblood Lectures
To Speech Students
Students in the advanced public
speaking classes of Carl G. Brandt,
instructor in the public speaking de-
partment, were the guests of profes-
sor Emeritus William C. Trueblood,
for many years head of the public
speaking department, in a special lec-
tuire at his home yesterday after-
noon.
Records of speeches by William
Jennings Bryan, William Howard
Taft, and other famous speakers were
heard and Professor Trueblood gave
a brief talk about his contacts with
several noted speakers.

COLUMBIA
RECORDS
1454-Happy Days and Lonely Nights
Lonely Little Bluebird.........................Ruth Etting
1448-Lonesome in the Moonlight
Come Back Chequita. .......................... Paul Whiteman

iiiiiii

ALL MEN DING ER
805 KAYNAIW STREET
MICHIGAN-The Ideal Vacation Land
MICHIGAN BELL
TELEPHONE CO.

=1 I

4

T e
FMr
ow /VIE
*IkR'Y UCROLL
16~
OFRC)(ST R , ST
"i°E This
by the
/; x the Gre
tions.

Calls Your Attention to
SOUTHEASTERN
MICHIGAN
The 300-mile shore line
of Southeastern Michigan,
curving northward from
the Ohio border on Lake
Erie, follows the busy De-
troit river, rounds beauti-
ful Lake St. Clair, the
Flats and St. Clair river,
bounds the mighty waters
of Lake Huron and forms
the outline of The Thumb
by circling Saginaw Bay.
water-bordered land, cooled
gentle breezes from two of
eat Lakes, is one of the Wol-
state's ideal vacation sec-

11

I

ten
to P rk
$ 11 18(up)
FORTHEJOIRI)TRIP
ET out your pad and
pencil, count your
savings, figure the cost--
andoffyougotoEuropevia
our TOURIST Third Cabin.
Specially reserved quarters
for TOURIST passengers on
such famous liners as
Majestic, world's largest
ship, Olympic, Homeric,
Belgenland, and others.

I

Dynamic Detroit, the automobile and
aviation center of the world, with its beauti-
ful suburban development, has many sister cities in
this section- Mt. Clemens, frequently called "the
Carlsbad of America" because of the popularity of
its mineral baths; Port Huron, with its sloping white
sand beaches at the headwaters of the St. Clair river;
Pontiac, the lusty manufacturing center, joined with
Detroit by the nation's greatest highway; and many
other thriving towns. All hold great educational,
scenic and recreational interest.
Whether the visitor to Southeastern Michigan comes
from far or near, he is as close to home as the nearest
telephone. And Long Distance Rates Are Sur-
prisingly Low!
Note the Day Station-to-Station rates for a three-
minute conversation between 4:30 a. m. and 7:00 p. m.
to representative points in Southeastern Michigan:

11

I

"ph

We offer the only steam-
ers In the world devoted
entirely to TOURIST pas-
sengers, Minnekadha,
Minnesota, Winifre-
dlan and Devonian. No
other class carried. You
have the freedom of all
decks. No class distinc.
tions.

)w

II

From Day
Ann Arbor Station-,t,-Station
to: Rate
AKRON .............$ .70
ALGONAC...............50
ARMADA-...............45
BAD .AXE................75
BAY PORT ............ .75
BIRMINGHAM............25
CLARK3TON.............35
CROSSWELL.............70
DEARBORN............ 10*
FAIRGROVE.............5
FARMINGTON...........20*
FLAT ROCK.............30
GAGETOWN.............70
LAPEER ...............50
MARINE CITY...........55
MONROE ..............30
MT. CLEMENS...........30
NEW BALTIMORE ......45
NORTHVILLE..........15
OXFORD................40
Feath of series of fve ad-
t'ecimwnts conceruing the
advantages of Michigan as
the "Ideal Vacation Land."

PECK................
PLYMOUTH..,.........
PONTIAC.. ......
PORT AUSTIN ........
PORT HURON.........
PORT SANILAC.......
ROCHESTER............
ROMEO...............
ROMULUS ............
ROYAL OAK...........
SANDUSKY............
SEBEWAING a..........
SNOVER..............
ST. CLAIR............-
TRENTOi .............
UTICA.............
WARREN.............
WAYNE .............
WYANDOTTE..........
*Rate for 5 minutes

.55
"15
".30
.60
.70
.35
.45
.15
.30
.70
.70
.30
.55
.25
.40
.35
.20*
.30

11

From Dy
Ann Arbor
to: Rato

I

. :5

Let us send you literature
describing our unusual
valuesineconomical travel.
"* *

WRITE TAlaLINE
RED JTA& LINE I.EYLAN D LINE
ATANIC TRANIPOR UNE
INTERNATIONAL bdRCANTILE MARINE COMPANr
Address No. 1 Broadway, New
York City, or any authorized
steamship agent.

You can keerp in touch wtaih
Stance Telep~hone. Watch for
the Blue Beat: Sign.

I

MICHIGAN-The Ideal Vacait ion Land-

1

s

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan