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August 02, 1928 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1928-08-02

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WEATHER
Unsettled wIth, probable
showers.

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~Iai1J

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. IX, No. 34. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 2, 1928 PRICE FIVE CENTS

* t i

WEDONESDAY OLYMPICS
UNCOVER NEWSPRINT
IN WILLIAMS
CANADIAN YOUTH CAPTURES 204)
METER RACE TO LEAD FIELD
AT AMSTERDAM
SABIN CARR SETS RECORD
Bud Houser Also Takes Discus Event
For America With Record Toss;
United States In Lead
OLYMPIC STANDIN0S {
(By Associated Press)
United States .......... 123 1-2
Great Britain...............32
Canada2...................2
S Finland .. ................ 231
Germany ............... 22 1-2 }
Sweden...................21f
South Africa..............14 1
Ireland...................10
France .....................5
( Haiti.....................5...
j Italy ....,...... .......... 4 1
Norway ...................... 3 I
Philippines.............3....3
Japan ...................... 2 j
Holland .....................1
(By Associated Press)
OLYMPIC STADIUM, AMSTER-
DAM, August 1-Percy Williams, 19
Year old Canadian schoolboy, whp
was taken along in the Dominin
athletic family, is now sprint cham-
pion of the world.
Flashing the same speed that gave
him the 100 meter victory two days
ago, the curly haired youth from Van-
couvrl staged a whirlwind spurt on
a rain soaked track to win the 200
meters from the best America, Eng-
land, and Germany could produce.
Blow To U. .
Williams, through his sensational
sweep, registered the first Olympic
sprint doubles ! since the American
Ralph Traice turned the trick in 1912,
and dealt another stunning blow to
Uncle Sam's trackmen who were shut
out in the dashes for the first time in
twenty years of .Olympic competi-
tion.
To make the American route on the
red cindered Olympic oval worse, S.
J. Atkinson, rangy South African,
emarged from the path in a spectacu-
lar 110 meter hurdle final to beat the
American trio of Stephen Anderson,
John Collier and Layton Dye and
equalled the world's record of 14 4-5
seconds.
Hauser Sets Record
In the Olympic record breaking per-
formances, Hauser repeated his 1924
dscus throwing triumph with two
other Americans, Jim Corson and
John Anderson, placing third and fifth
while Carr stopped the pole-vaulting
field in which the Yankees took four
of the first five places.
The Olympic polet vault was almost
exclusively an American affair as had
been expected. ,Carr with 4.20 meters
or 13 feet 9.6 inches, and William
Brodgmuzller with 4.10 meters or 13
feet and 5 7-16 inches, battled it out
for first place in a great duel.

TO GIVE LECTURE
THIS AFTERNOON

President C. C. Little
Who will speak on "Science and
Religion" at 5 o'clock this afternoon
in Hill auditorium.
UITTLE TO GIVE F[IRST
SUMMER TALK TODAY
Shift From Natural Science Building
Because Of Limited Space; Topic
Is "Science And Religion"
IS ONLY PUBLIC ADDRESS
President ;Clarence Cook Little
will deliver an address to Summer
Session students and members of the
faculty on the subject "Science and
Religion" this afternoon at 5 o'clock
in Hill, auditorium. The change from
Natural Science auditorium was made
in view of the limited seating ac-
comodations there. The lecture will
be given under the auspices of the
StudentdChristian Association.
The doors of Hill auditorium will
be opened at 4:30, thus enabling
those desiring front seats to go to
the Auditorium early. Ample seating
accomodations, however, will be
available for all who atend the lec-
ture.
President Little's appearance this
afternoon will be his first public ad-
dress before students and faculty of
this Summer Session. During the
three years that Dr. Little has been
president, of the University he has
spent his summers in traveling and
this is the first summer that he has
President Little's scientific train-
ing and his subsequent scientific re-
search pursuits.especially qualify
him to give an adequate treatment of
his subject one that is now attract-
ing universal interest.
M. R. KEYWORTH
TO SPEAK TODAY
M. R. Keyworth, Superintendent of
Schools of Hamtramck and a non-
resident professor in the School of
Education for the summer, will de-
liver an address on "The Problem of
Public Relations" at the Educational
Conference in the auditorium of Uni-
versity High school today at 4 p. m.

MC MURRY SAYS VITAL
PROBLEM PRESENTED
BY TAX DELINQUENCYt
GEOGRAPHY PROFESSOR TELLS
OF CONDITIONS AMONG
CUT-OVER LANDS
HURTS SMALL LOCALITIES
Avers Maps Should Be Specific Enough
To Show Degree Of Delinquency,
Lands To Be Redeemed
"It is clear that our four and a
half million dollar tax delinquency is
one of the most serious problems
with which the state is faced, but
further than that we know little
that is definite and specific about the
actual conditions that cause it," de-
clared Prof. Kenneth C. McMurry of
the geography department in his lec-
ture on "Tax ;Delinquency in the Cut-
Over Lands of Northern Michigan"
yesterday afternoon in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium.
We know a little about its distri-
bution and its relationship to the kind
of land with which it occurs, but we
ought to know also what lands are
likely to be redeemed and the exact
degree of tax delinquency-our maps
should be not only general but speci-
fic.
State Revenues Decrased
"State revenues are somewhat de-
creased by delinquency, of course, but
the greatest burden falls upon the
local governments," the speaker con-
tinued. "Many counties are receiving
more money from the state than they
give to It. When counties include
(both farm land and cut-over land
that is delinquent, the farm land has
to bear all the burden of taxation,
and as a result there is an alarming
increase in bankruptcy."
Illustrates Lecture
A number of maps and charts were
shown to illustrate the lecture. Two
maps showing increase in improved
agricultural land from 1890 to 1910
indicated that although before 1890
only the southern half of the south-
ern peninsula had been developed ex-
tensively progress since had included
the lake coast of the southern pen-
insula and a few counties in the
north. Present figures gathered by
the Land Economics Survey of the
state department of conservation
show, however, that 50 to 70 per cent
of the southern peninsula is improved
for agriculture, while in the northern
peninsula the average is from one to
three per cent.
FLLING GATE KILLS
NINE 1NJURES'MANY
(By Associated Press)
ST. CATHERINE'S, ONTARIO, Aug.
1-A huge. construction crane falter-
ed today and dropped ah500 ton steel
gate for a lock into the excavation
of the Welland Canal at Thorold,
crushing to death at least nine work-
men and injuring or killing about 30
others.
Approximately 41 men were in the
vicinity when the accident occured
just before noon, and none apparen-
"ly escaped death or injury. Rescue
workers immediately attacked the'

mass of tangled steel and debris in
an effort to reach the cranemen, riv-
eters, helpers and groundmen who
were trapped in the excavation as
the gate fell.
Two cranes were raising the gate.
One held, but the second slipped and
dropped the gate into a steel fabric
on one side of the lock.
Identification of the victims was
difficult, some of them being crushed
almost beyond recognition.
BASEBALL SCORES
(By Associated Press)
American League
Detroit 10, Washington 5.
New York 12, St. Louis 1.
Philadelphia 6, Cleveland 4.
Chicago 4-7, Boston 2-3.
Nattonal League
All games called on account of the
rin.

LEAGUE TO HONOR
ORIENTALSTODAY
Oriental men and women on cam-
pus are cordially invited by the Wom-
en's league to be guests of honor
at a special tea to be held this after-
noon from 3:30 to 5 o'clock in the
Women's Field house. Edward H.
Kraus, dean of the Summer Session
and Mrs. Kraus, and Miss Beatrice
Johnson, Advisor of women, will be
present. Women students of the Sum-
mer Session are urged to attend and
meet the Oriental students. Doris
Renkenberger will be in charge.
This is the fourth of the special
teas given under the auspices of the
Women's league. It also is the last
tea to be given during the Summer
Session. The league will conclude its
social activities on August 9 with a
reception in the Field house. There
will be dancing and an opportunity
will be given to inspect the building.
HANNAH WILL PRESENT
PROGRAM of READINGS
Selections Both Classic And Popular
Will Be Included In Evening
Of Prose And Poetry
HAS APPEARED ON STAGE
Readings of selections both classic
and popular in character will feature
a program of prose and poetry to be
delivered by Dr. Robert Hannah, of
the speech department, at eight
o'clock next Monday night in the Nat-
ural Science auditorium. The read-
ings will be interpretational, and will
be include selections from a number
of well known writers, according to
Doctor Hannah.
The program wvill consist of several
selections from the works of Alfred
Noyes, tie English poet, some of
Stephen Leacock's humor writings,
and a few of the French-Canadian
poems of Dr. William Henry Dr am-
mond. Follbwing this will be some
cuttings from Victor Hugo's "Les
Miserables," one or two of the short
stories of Edgar Allan Poe, and sev-
eral of Thomas A. Daly's Italian dia-
lect poems.
Dr. Hannah, who came to the uni-
versity 'last year from Cornell, has
had a great deal of experience as a
speaker and a reader. He has studied
with Leland T. Powers in Boston,
with Prof S. A. Clark, former head of
the department of Speech at Chicago
University, and with Arthur Edward
Phillips, teacher and author of Kim-
ball Hall, Chicago. He has also
traveled extensively through the Unit-
ed States and Canada, and has spent
many years on the stage. He ap-
peared with George Arliss in the play,
"Disraeli," and also in Henry Davis'
"Every Woman" and in several of
his other plays.
The reading is open to the public
as well as to\those enrolled in the
summer school.

DAIL TO CONDUCT 1PRESIDENTIAL
'EXPERIMENTAL__POLL O'N CAMPUS
Next Wednesday Named As Date For
Straw Vote To Learn Strength
Of LeadingCandidates
TO CLASS VOTERS INTO THREE GROUPS
In an endeavor to ascertain the political judgment on the cam-
pus this summer in regard to candidates in the present Presidential
campaign, The Summer Daily will hold an experimental poll on
next Wednesday, it was announced yesterday. All arrangements for
the poll will be in the hands of the publication, and complete pro-
tection will be afforded from any outside organizations.
It is felt at this time that a considerable amount of interest
regarding the Republican and Democratic candidates for the presi-
dency exists among the students and faculty this summer, and that
opinions as will be voiced next
Wednesday are formed as the result
of true knowledge of facts and in-
tellectual consideration. For this
reason the editors of The Summer
Daily feel that such interest, espe-
cially in view of the fact that this__
is a presidential year, warrants an Prof. C. 0. Davis Points To Fact That
experimental poll to sound out the They Are Ideal Testing Schools,
strength of the various candidates. Givepi Right Preparation
Will Omit Issues
Unlike the ballots in the Presi- BELIEVES RADIO USEFUL
denial Poll conducted by The Daily___
last March, those now being .printed "Junior Colleges are the country's
for the surv on Wednesdav will t-

tempt only to ascertain the strength
of the Presidential candidates. That
is, various campaign issues, such as
prohibition and entry into the World
Court, which were included in the
previous poll, will be omitted.
Voters will be classed as male and
female and then, again, into the
three divisions of faculty, graduate
students and' regular Summer Ses-
sion students. In this way the com-
parative opinions of each group can
be learned. A sample ballot will be
published on Wednesday mornings
Issue of The Daily, the day the poll
is to be conducted.
Detailed arrangements for conduct-
ing the poll will be announced in
The Daily of Tuesday morning, al-
though they will follow the course
of the usual campus elections and
the previous poll. Tables will be
placed at two or three of the points
of advantage on the campus and
members of the staff of the publica-
tion will be in charge of the ballot-
ing.
Must Sign Name
In order to effect a system of
checking to determine the eligibility
of voters and to prevent duplication,
it will be necessary for each voter
to sign his or her name, address and
class. No publicity will be given to
any of the individual results obtain-
ed in this way. Ballots will be count-
ed by members iof the staff of the
publication at the conclusion of vot-
ing late Wednesday afternoon and
the results will be published in
Thursday morning's paper.

great opportunity schools designed to
incite ambitions in the pupils, and to
prepare them for life in the world in
which they will live after they leve
their lessons," stated Prof. C. 0.
Davis, of the School of Education, in
a lecture i on "The Junior High
School Problem In The Smaller Dis-
tricts," in the auditorium of the Uni-
versity High school' yesterday after-
noon.
"They are ideal places for testing
out the abilities of young people, and
for introducing them to great and
varied experience of the types that
they will find confronting them in
after life. In fact, the whole pur-
pose of the Junior Highi School might
be summed up as being the creation
of outlooks."
Professor Davis began his lecture
by clearly defining what he meant by
a Junior High School and what he
meant by a snall district. "This new
type of high school is, as defined by
the North Central Association, a
grouping of the seventh, eighth, and
ninth grades in a separate division
from the rest of the school system;"
he said. The small district he char-
acterized as that haing 2,500 popula-
tion or less, but added that it was
perhaps better to define the small
district as that one having a high
school of 500 pupils or less.
"The main source of all trouble in
maintaining a satisfactory school sys-
tem in a small community is the lack
of finances," he went on. "However
there are many parts of the junior
college system that can be establish-
ed at not too large a cost." Among
other things the speaker recommend-
ed a program of studies comprising
both the ordinary curriculum of the
grades that go to make up the Jun-
high school and also a number of sub-
jects, such as business' arithemtic,
fine arts courses, nature study, and
music appreciation courses, that
would be a help and an inspiration
to the student all through life.
"I think that every school should
1 have a motion picture machine, and,
if possible a radio also," he conclud-
ed. "They are strong aids in keeping
up the spirit of the institution and
in giving the pupils clear, interesting
instruction."
WILL TALK TODAY
ON SPEECH WORK
"The History of the Teaching of
Public Speaking" will be the subject
of an address by Professor Emeritus
William C. Trueblood, for many
years head of the speech department,
in the Adelphi room on the fourth
floor of Angell hall this morning at
9 o'clock.
The lecture is designed especially
for advanced students in public
speaking, although the public is wel-

THREE ARTISTS HEARD IN LAST
FACULTY CONCERT OF SEASON

WOMEN MAKE BETTER TEACHERS
THAN DO MEN, SAYS DR. SOLVE

"Sensitiveness to the reactions of
others is a fundamental requisite of
a teacher," declared Dr. Norma D.
Solve, instructor in education. "A
second requirement is adaptability.
Women have these characteristics to
a much greater degree than men and
consequently are better suited for
teaching as a rule. A third factor in
their favor is that generally they are
much more tactful. This is of great-
est importance when dealing with
children, especially in the adolescent
stage.
"There is a wonderful opportunity
for women in high school teaching,"
Dr. Solve continued. "Men have drop-
ped out to a great extent. College
work, administrative positions, and
business affairs have attracted them'
away from this field, leaving it open.

chance.' It is an opportunity to suc-
ceed in a professional field.
"In teaching, as in most other
fields, women have to work harder
than men to succeed. This is partly
because recognition and advancement
come from adniinistrative officers
who are men and naturally inclined
to favor other men. More and more'
administrators are coming to realize
the value of a mixed staff and will'
try to have both men and women for
balance. All men or all women makes
for lopsidedness.
"As students, women are much
more consistent than men. They are
reliable, quick witted, and swift to
sense the point but seldom persue
it. Men are more original and have
a force which atones for their lack
of consistency in their work. They
will trace matters to logical conclu-

A Review, by Lyle R. Chubb
Whether summer students appre-
ciate what the School of Music has
done for them this summer in the
way of providing music of the finest
type in a town where the ordinary
summer level scarcely rises above
rankest jazz, I don't know; but last
night's concert, which is reported to
be the last of the season, hereby gets
a word of gratitude.
Earl V. Moore at the organ was
the accomplished artist of the eve-
ning. His opening performance of
the Allegro from Widor's sixth sym-
phony for organ was marked by mas-
terly registration and sympathetic
coloring in the majestic development
of the first theme, and in the final
passage where the two themes were
blended. In the Bach choral with its
appealing use of the vox humana and
in Bonnet's "Romance sans Paroles"
with its soft string and flute melody,
Mr. Moore showed his mastery of the
quiet and subdued side of his instru-
ment. His own composition, "Reverie
at Twilight," was distinguished for
its graceful use of the chimes.
Miss Thelma Lewis has a fine clear
voi~ ice andPzod technicl nl unn't.

She shows distinct promise, and even
a good measure of actual achieve-
ment. Anyone who can sing Scarlat-
ti and Mozart as she did last night,
with excellent portamento and vol-
ume control, is worthy of hearty com-
mendation. I particularly enjoyed her
rendition of Richard Hageman's set-
ting to Tagore's charmingly playful
poem, "At the Well." Her encore was
Cyril Scott's "The Unforeseen." Her
only fault is a slight immaturity.
The same fault to a greater; degree
was noticeable in the playing of Miss
Emily Mutter, particularly in the
double stop passages in the Andante
of her concerto and in the thinness of
some of her notes. Her love for her
art, however, will in time make her
win out, I am sure. Her encore was
Nreisler's "Caprice Viennois."
CALLES SUPPORT SOUGHT
(By Associated Press)
MEXICO CITY, Aug. 1-President
Calles has been asked to give govern-
ment support to a projected commer-
cial air line, also to carry mail be-
tween Mexico City and Merida, Yu-

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