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July 02, 1925 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1925-07-02

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THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

[CIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
iIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SUMMER SESSION
ied every morning except Monday
the University Summer Session by
rd in Control of Student Publica-
Associated Press is exclusively en-
the use for republication of all news
s credited to it or not otherwise
in this paper and the local news pub-
erein.
d at the Ann Arbor, Michiran,
e as second class matter.
iption by carrier, $1.50; by mail,
: Press Building, Maynard Street,,
>or, Michigan.
unications, if signed as evidence of
h, will be ptblished in The Summer
the discretion of the Editor. Un-
ommunications will receive no con-:
n. The signature may be omitted in.
n if desired by'the writer. The
Daily does not necessarily endorse
iments expressed in the communica-
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
NORMAN R. THAL
litor.............Robert S. Mansfield
.itor............Manning HousewortL
Editor.............Marion Mead
ditor.............LeRoy L.Osborn
ditor...........W. Calvin Patterson
Assistants
T. Barbour George E. Lehtinen
Boron Philip R. M'arcuse.
h Brown Marion Meyer
Burris Ralph B. Nelson
. Guthrie Miriam Schlotterbeck
e Lardner Nance Solomon
ni Lehtine~n Wendall Vreeland

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER'
JOHN W. CONLIN
ng................Thomas
n.................Kermit
An. .. .Frank
ASSISTANTS

Independence, need not rob the Glor-
ious Fourth of any tf its meaning.
We \must express our enthusiasm
some way, but why with gunpowder
interections? We must pick some one
day to mark the pecurrence of the
grea'test event 'in modern history, so
why not the Fourth of July?
That grand and glorious feeling
must infest William Jennings, now
that he's won a place on practically
every front page in the nation for the
next month.
"Dinner Guests Robbed of $800" -
FreenPress headline. It is very ap-
parent that that robbery didn't oc-
cur in Ann Arbor.
CAMPUS OPINION
Auonymous communi'.atons will be
Sdisregarded. The nmes of communi-
tiats. will, however, e regarded as
conidential uaon request.
A "BETTER MAN" - SELF-STYLED
To the Editor:
The communicatin signed "Anoth
er Teacher" which appeared in your
columns yesterday morning only echo-
ed views which , still another teach-
er (male), have had ever since I
came on the campus for this Summer
session. I walked the diagonal when
men were men and, what is more,
when women were women-the rough
and ready sort who did not care for
personal adornment.
This, was illustrated perfectly on my
first visit to my fraternity house.
One evening I thought I would go up
after dinner and meet any boys in the
active chapter who might be attend-
ing the Summer session. I started
up the -walk and heard a voice
through the open window upstairs
(in my day they kept them closed
under such circumstances) say:
"Wonder who this funny looking gent
coming here might be? Slip on some
pants and go down and see what the
old cogger wants." Those words
rang home. They typify the modern
Michigan men.
Then as for the women. They are
a brazen lot, with their short skirts,
their bobbed hair, their rouged cheeks,
their rolled stockings. Why in my
day-and yours, "Another Teacher"
-there wasn't an intriguing girl on
the campus. No wonder the boys take
the co-eds out instead of, "importing,"
as they had to in the "good old days."
Now I understand there are a few
women on the campus who conform to
the old traditions-making themselves
as unattractice as possible-and that
they have no more dates than co-eds
used to in our day. That is the prop-
er spirit. We must get back to the
days of long trousers and longer
skirts if Michigan is to continue to
be the, home of real men.
These are just a few things that I
would like to have the young people
know that we former students notice
when we come back-to whoop it up
in Summer session. Now when I was
in college, our trousers came to our
ankles instead of our knees, we wore
big, burly black woolen sweaters in-
stead of brightly colored ones. We
were men.

OSTED ROLL
ANY ICE
ammmeLADY!
Sunmnier Excursions No. 348
We were enjoying the reading of
Arrowsmith (adv.)) yesterday after-
noon when in barged Olaf who is, as
you know or otherwise as the case
nmy be, a medic. Sezee:
"Let's go froggin'-I need more
specimens for my lab."
"Oh," sezwe, "How, if any?"
"Down by the old mill stream,"
sezee, so we went because that re-
minded us of a song. Didja ever hear
it? Well, never mind-to get on with
our story.
To make a short story longer, we
donned our waders, entered Olaf's
Lizzy of tin and started forth.

.

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a C. Finsterwald Thos. E. Sunderland
THURSDAY, JULY 2, 1925
ght Editor-LEROY L. OSBORN
XALY MUST PAY, AT ONCE
hat the; administrative heads of
federal government are determin-
Go save, as much money as possible
the American public has been for-
y illustrated several times during
past few weeks. This attitude was
iu emphasized Tuesday when Sec-
try of State Kellogg informed the
ibers of the Italian debt commis-
L, In plain, straightforward lang-
e, that the United tSates expects
y td begin pay ents on her $2,000,-
000 debt at on , and that no mor-
'ium willbe granted. ,
r. Kellogg is essentially a diplom-
and diplomatic ways and manner-
s must be perfectly natual with
.For this reason he is to be giv-
addit-ional credit for stepping from
flowery path of diplomatic lang-
5 to talking cold, hard facts with
ive members- of the Italian com-
sion.
is hard to imagine Mr. Kellogg
ng fellow diplomats that this
itry is tired of beating around the
l' and wants immediate action, but
Ives the people of the nation a
sfactory feeling to know that the
at the head of their government
e enough courage to take a stand.
SOME MORE SANITY
mere is more to the sane Fourth
than - merely being careful in
ting off firecrackers. There is the'
lug of a sane idea of what pyro-
nics really are. There is the ac-
ing of a sane notion .of what is
g celebrated.
is the unspoken opinion of many
fireworks were invented to cele-
e .the anniversaries of American
pendence and are unique to our
land. On the contrary, their
id is. lost in antiquity and they
hed ,perfection first among the
4ese, who use them today to fright-
,ff devils and not to worry auto-
ile drivers. In Europe, the Flor-
nes carried on the development
isplay pieces, producing the fam-
Roman candle. After the Mid-
Ages, pyrotechnics in Europe
e used mainly at fetes for royalty.
enlisted the same devices to com-
orate our freedom from -kings.-
id those who explode the giants,
edoes, pinwheels, and flower pots
say that they are celebrating
r the signing or the adoption of
Declaration of Independence. But
Declaration proper was adopted,
on the fourth, but on the second.
uly. As for the signing of the
osed document, that began on
1st 2 and went on for months, one
e signiers not taking his seat un-
ovember. What we celebrate on
4 is the adoption of the preamble
he Declaration of Independence
imortal words penned by Thom-i
efferson.
e sanity that reveals fireworks as
list trinkets and the facts already
tioned about the Declaration of

i

ANOTHER TEACHER,
One of the better men of Michigan.
AND IN 1950, WU ATT
To the Editor:
* We see by this morning's Daily tha!
the vintage of '00 is again breaking
into. lrint with their' old lament,,
"What is the campus coming to?"
School teaching certainly does
poison the disposition, doesn't it? Too
bad pegtop trousers aren't as preval-
ent as they used to be. Still even
white knickers may be called pants,
if one must be definite.
We seem to remember having heard
that in the "good old days," a student
that took a co-ed to a dance was
considered mentally deficient. A good
looking co-ed, now, has as many
dates as she wants without waiting
for those from Ypsi.
As for squandering ways, we wond-.
er how many dates she has had to
acquire first hand information. She
certainly does seem well informed.
The percentage that Joe Parker used
to get probably goes for knickers"
(white, they're cheaper), sweaters, and
cigarettes. The moral degeneracy is
quite noticeable. Co-eds can now walk
downtown on Saturday night without
a chaperone. What decadence!
We suppose razzing one's sorority
sisters in, print was considered the
height of good form when she was iii
college. Our ignorance of good man-
ners is lamentable. Would she be so
kind as to inform us on the subject.
Perhaps these Ypsi "he-men" are
more informed, but we would be ex.
tremely grateful.
Of course we probably couldn't un-
derstand, being lazy cigarette-smok-+
ing.loafers, still the information might
do us some good, and set a few of us
on the highroad to reformation.
ANOTHER NASH.

"I know a place" sezolaf, "where
frogs is bigger as sheep."
Knowing well his tendency to slight
exaggeration, we took it with a grain
of salt, and even a dash or two of pep-
per, together with a dash-but we di-
gress, Knowing, etc., we set about
looking for tadpoles the size of mead-
ow-larks. We musta been in the gar-
den of Eden, 'cause all we saw was
snakeses (note, the added plural is
employed to denote quantity).
First off Olaf barged into a swampy
looking place.
"Dar wan hops," said he, falling
into the vernacular of his native land.
"Yust' wait while I poke him out
wance."
He poked, but it wasn't a frog-it
had a tail, and traveled, like an
army, on its stomach.
"Hit it, quick!" belows Olaf.
"What within?" we asks, hurriedly
withdrawing.
"A stick," sezee.
"Oh," sezwe much relieved, and
reaching up we grasped a stick firmly
and hit the snake with a sock like
holeproof. Then we put the stick
back up.
Thus with sparkling bits of repar-
tee we enlivened the time. After two
hours, 43 snakes, five pollywogs and
one frog, we went home, late for din-
ner, tired out, and. nearly raving mad
with the thought of rolls to write.
0
4 4
Nearly Raving
In view of the fact that this, like
our excursion through the medical
building, has furnished souvenirs
which we really don't want, we hereby
offer 43 slightly used snakes as prizes
for the 43 best contributions which
are received for the column tomorrow.
Four tadpoles will go for honorary
mention. Olaf kept the frog, or you
could have that, too.
SCANDAL
Anonymous
The above snapshot, sent to our of-
fice in a plain sealed envelope, car-
ries with it the breath of scandal. A
typewritten statement signed Anony-
mous, who is somebody we don't know,
states that the snap was taken through
the windows of the Rho Damyou Rho
house. The fraternity is said to be
the national sailors' organization,
founded in the year of Volstead, the
first. We ain't saying a word, mor2
or less.
* * *
Sunday school is over-hey, where's
the fire?
q -Tamam.
There must be a feeling of security
connected with having the world's
champion rifle shot for a wife.
Wonder what Charlie Chaplin, Jr.,
will be like?

Name.......
Address..............
City.....................
State........

R. DAY BIRD
Corner Washington and. Division

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Shaded
Scarfs of
Georgette

Like a trembling rainbow
these exquisitely shaded s
of the sheerest georgette.
the brilliance of some bea
color to its finest pastels
each scarf ranges. Anoth
vention for the eternal fem
for when she has chose
color and wrapped the d
folds about her throat she
find that she has eccentuate
loveliness of her compl
the color of her eyes, the
in hair.

v are
scarfs
From
utiful
shade
er in-
dnine,
n her
dainty
e will
d the
exion,
tints

The mode
the time
new, dist
must find
accessorie:
personalit3
plains the
istic effec
scarfs, etc
They are
as artistic
we selecte
choice.

rn woman
n every wa
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for her the
s to match h
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vogue for
ct in hand
c. But why
charming fc
as they ar
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C

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you contemplate buying, it will pay
you to consult us before making a
decision.

Accessories Important to Selection

A Slin of Beauty is a Joy Forever
Tmo Experts Give Aid and Advice
Elizabeth Arden Helen Rubinstein

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Cosmetics have taken a new place, for they no longer
merely convey the impression of powder and rouge.
They now include the proper creams for cleansing and
softening the skin. Even the skeptics have had to
admit the obvious improvement such scientific prep-
arations as those of Elizabeth Arden or the famous
Madame Rubinstein can make upon the skin. It is a
matter of hygiene as well as beauty and these experts
are renowned for their years of successful study.

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Such a fascinating array. Everything from the fluted
jabots of printed crepe, that are now so conspicuous,
to the boyish stiffly starched collar and cuff sets in
bright plaids. There are the fine linen vest collars
with cuffs to match either with lace and embroidery
. or perfectly tailored in contrast to the frilled affairs
of net and lace or ruffled organdy. Each set will give
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50c up to $3.50
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Trim, Belts of Suede and Leather
The belt for your sports sweater or your afternoon
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For the sporting togs we have narrow belts of bright
suede in green, red, tan or grey. For the wash silk
frock,etc., we have gay and snappy looking belts of
Roman striped silk with beautifully finished buckles
of suede in blending color. Then for the dressy little
garment of possibly crepe, etc., there are glistening
belts of gold brocade.
MACK'S MAIN FLOOR

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