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July 02, 1925 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1925-07-02

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D~AY AMN i

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 1925

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PRICE FIV

f

SR . DO'T OPN
T NEGOTIATiONS
NH FENCH BODY
[M CONSIDERS TIME OPPOR-
IUNE FOR INITIATING
SETTLEMENT:
DI S, NOT LOANS
x Forced to Modify Plans by
oeialst Wing of Majority
Party
BULLETIN
ris, July 1A.- (By A.P.)-
Caillaux, minister of finance,
d in his attempt tonight to
uade the chamber of, deputies,
lopt the senate's propsal that
ne tax payers should declare
holdings abroad without
ig an oath. The vote was
to 229 against the measure,
it was not made °a question
nfidence and the government
terefore not affected.
s, July 1.-(By A.P.)-Accord-
persistent reports curIent in
ent circles, France, following
ample of Belgium, is about to
commission to Washington to
te the funding of the French
> the United States.
Ign Minister Briand is said to
the time as opportune to in-,
egotiations. This view is shar-
Finance Minister Caillaux and
annomncement of their depart-
expected soon.]
understood that the French
cuent Doon d- to inform the
States of its desire to open ne-
m in Washngton for settle-
'f the French debt.
uctions to this effect may be,
y Foreign Minister Briand
to M. Daeschner, the French
ador in Washington.
ous consideration is being
it' the foreign- office and min-
f finance as to what specifically
proposed or accepted. Advis-
the foreign minister do not
to have reached their con-
s as yet, but it is recognized,
oth the American and Britishj
must be arranged as part of
ench government's program to
e the country's finances this;
I.
rits Deemed Necessary *
Its to the United States are
i necessary for this purpose.
>rd loan is not used, but rather
, probably somewhat of the na-
those recently obtained by
d with the federal reserve
o assist in stabilizing the
n M. Briand and Finance Min-
aillaux are ready to make de-.
roposals, experts will be sent
hington to treat with the Am-
debt funding commission.
aillaux's plans for financial re-
>n and debt funding have been
inged ,by the opposition to his
ax measures encountered from
eialist wing of the government-
liamentary majority.
equently, he has been -obliged
ify his three-step plan, which
a begin with the balancing of
dget, followed by the voting of
axes to provide a sinking fund,

yment of the debts, after
would come stabilization of the
and debt settlement.
Briand and M. Caillaux are
that negotiations should be
ed only when the French gov-
it is able to make a precise
o the American debt funding
ssion. Therefore they have
I to dispose of the budget ques-
nd require a treasury margin
sending a formal communica-
i Washington.
laseball Scores

Second Faculty Concert Wins
Approval Of Large Audience

By Ina Ellen Lelhtinen
The second concert of the summer particularly appealing song, and
Faculty concert series was presented "From the Canebrake" of Gardner's.
last night in Hill auditorium by Mar- She was called back twice, and for
Ian Struble-Freeman, violinist, accom- an encore she repeated "From the
panied by Mrs. George B. Rhead, and the Canebrake."
Eunice Northrup, contralto, ' accom- Miss Northrup concluded the pro-
panied by Dwight Steere. It was at-gram with the following numbers:
tended by more than 2,000 people, an "The Forest of Oaks" by MacFadyen,
unusually large audience for these "Jackie" by Mortelmans, "In the
concerts. Wood of Finvara" by BurleighW and
The program was opened by a vio- "Take Joy Home" by Bassett.
lin solo by Mrs. Freeman, the Ballade All of th} numbers were enthusias-
et Polonaise of H, Vieuxtemps. The tically received by the audience, es-
next number was a group of three peciallly the violin solos by Mrs.
songs of Brahtms, Auf dem Kirclihof, Freeman, who has a charming stage
Vergebliches Standchen, and Von presence, which adds much to the
ewiger Liebe, rendered by Miss North- possible appreciation of her music,
rup. Mrs. Freeman then gave the fol- The third of the faculty concert
lowing: "Lamento D'Ariane of Masse series will be given at 8 o'clock Wed-
net," "Musette by Sibelius-Powett," a nesday in Hill auditorium,

.,

1_
I
ii

MRS. W. F. LOWE, FORMERLY
IjLLLIAN A. HUGH ES, LEAVES
Announcement was made yes-
terday afternoon of the mar-j
riage of Miss Lillian A.tHughes,
assistant registrar of the Uni-
versity, to William F. Lowe, '24.
The marriage took place on
June 21, 1924, in Toledo, Ohio,
but Mrs. Lowe did not announce
the fact that she was married
until just before she left here
yesterday to join her hus-
band.
The couple will make their
home in Midwest, Wyo., where
Mr. Lowe is in the oil busi-
ness.

Teach Health
To Children,
Expert Urges

LECTURER TELL1
MEANING OFT
MEXICAN REI
AGRARIAN LABOR ORGANIZ
IS ONLY HOPE FOR FUTJ
HE THINKS

SOCIOLOGIST ,1TALS
OAN CRIME TONIGHT
Making of the Professional Criminal
To be Tannenbaum's Topic
For Second Lecture
PLANS TO WRITE BOOK
Frank Tannenbaum, sociologist,
who delivered a lecture yesterday aft-
ernoon in the Natural Science audi-
torium, will speak a second time at
5 o'clock this afternoon in the same
place. Tis subject today will be "The
Making of the Professional Crimin-
Mr. Tannenbaum has stopped at
Ann Arbor on his way to Mexico, from
which he reutrned last September,
where he will continue his study of
0o0ial problems. The results of these
studies avir. Tannenbaum will incor-
porate in his doctor's thesis at Rob-
ert Brooking's Graduate school in
Washington, D. C. Later he expects
to publish this in book form.
Mr. Tannenbaum explains that his
present study of social conditions in
Mexico has not decreased his inter-
est is criminology, and prison re-
form. He Mates that he has complet-
ed an article upon these topics which
will be published in an eastern mag-
azine at an early date.
IMMEL HERE FOR VISIT;I
WILL STAYTVWO MONTHS1
Prof. Ray K.Immel of the public
speaking deportment, who has beenk
on a leave of abseuce for the last year,
returend to the University yesterday.
He will be here for two months, do-
ing research work in the physchology
laboratories.3
Professor Immel left the University
at the end of the second term last year
and went to the University of South-
ern California, where, he has been
connected with the school of speech.
Recently Professor Immel's leave
of absence was extended for another
year, and he expects to return to Cal-
ifornia in September to continue his
work there. He was connected with
the public speaking department here
for 12 years.
_ f -
WHAT'S GOING~ ON
THUTRSDA Y
2:00-Women's League tea on terrace
of Martha Cook building.j
x:00-"The Making of a Professiona
Criminal," by Mr. :Frank Tannen-
baum.
8 :0-"Child Hygiene," by Miss Sally
L. Jean, of New York City.

REGULAL IR MAI
SERVICE STAR1TED
Dever, Sunderson, Lueder Participate
in Launching of East Bound
Plane
DAWES GIVES TALK
Chicago, July 1.-(By A.P.)-Over-
night air mail service between the two
rival cities of the continent started
tonight when mail planes hopped off
at dusk from New York and Chicagoj
on the first of the regular flights.
Flying over a beacon lighted course,
the mail carriers of the air will pass
each other somewhere ' over the
slumbering country tonight. Eight
and a quarter hours after hopping off
the east bound plane is scheduled to
arrive in New York and the west
bound carrier in Chicago.
Along the 700 mile course there are
32 landing fields with six lights of
five million candle power each to
guide the flyers, intermittant flash
lights and beacons designating emer-
gency landing fields.
Vice President Charles Dawes offi-
cially started the east bound plane
from a local broadcasting field.
Aboard the plane was a box of flowers
which the Vice President sent to Col.
John Coolidge,
Maj. William B. Dever, Col. Pul
Sunderson, Assistant Postmaster-
General Arthur C. Lueder, and others
participated in the ceremonies of the
launching of the east bound plane. A
committee of women's club members
viewed the start from another plane,
CAR WOODY TO TALK
ATNATINL MEETING
Prof. Wilbert L. Carr of the Lati
department and Prof. lIifford Wggdy
(director of the bureau of educational
reference and research, are among
those listed as speakers before the an-
nual summer convention of the Na
tional Education association, which
is in session in Indianapolis at the
present time.
Professor Carr addressed the Clas-
sical conference at 8 o'clock last
evening. Professor Wsdy will ad-
dress the departn'ient of elementary
school principals at 2 o'clock this aft-
ernoon. He. will speak upon the top-
lc, "The Educational Value of Teach-
ing science in Grades One Through
j i
74 CANDIDATEISQUAIFy
ASB PUBLIC ACOUNTANTS

CAPAITY REACHED
AT FRESH AIR CAMP
Permanent Dining Facilities Added;
Improvements Made in Docks
and Wharves
ISBELL SUPERINTENDS
The University Fresh Air camp,
which is operated' by the Student
Chirtsian association, is now caring
for a large number of boys. Young-
sters from Jackson, Ann Arbor, and
Flint filled the camp to capactiy dur-
ing the first period of operation. Each
camping period lasts for 10 days, aft-
er which a new group of boys are
taken into the camp.
The leaders of the eamp are all
University men who have been inter-
ested in the work of the S, C. A.
Rensis Likert, '26E, has been replaced
as camp superintendent by Egbert Is.
bell, grad. The list of leaders is as
follows Douglas Whlttemore, '27,
Lawrence 4onl4, instructor in geol-
ogy, Alexander Maslow, instructor in
mathematics, Joseph A. Barkovitch,!
'25E, Elmon L. Vernier, '26, Theodore
Hornberger, '27, John S, Congo, '26E,
Frank Bailey, grad, superintendent of
the camp in 1922,jugh Bailey, grad,
Perry Bailey, grad,' James Bibbins.
'26, Ralph Patterson, '26, and Jack
Schwartz, '25E. ,The camp doctor is
Dr. Morris Wild of Delray hospital,
Petroit,
A new dock and wharf have been
constructed at the camp, and the
L~ockwod Ash company of Jackson
has constructed and installed a new
motor in the power boat.
A permanent dining pavilion has
been built which is 28 by 42 feet.
This pavilion will accommodate more
than 150 people,
In the near future a drive will be
held for the purpose of raising $400
from the summer students Students
of the regular session have already
contributed about $1,600, and it is
hoped by officials of the S. C. A. that
the total for the two sessions will
reach $2,440,
Will Give Tea
For Women Today
First on the list of social functions
which the Women's League has plan-
ned for the summer is the tea to be
given from 2 to 4 o'clock today at
Martha Cook building. To play host-
ess and*'get women acquainted with
each other is the main duty taken
up by the League for this summer, and
all women are urged to attend. Re-
freshments will be served.
Dean Jean Hamilton, dean of wo-
men, Mrs. John R. 'Effinger, and Mrs.
A. S. Whitney will receive. Serving
will be; Elisabeth Woodward, '26,
Ruth Binns, '26, Elizabeth IBa m, '26,
Juanita Wallace, '26, and Catherine
Miller, '26.
Hold Bacon Bat
This Afternoon

"The day is coming, I believe,"
believes Miss Sally L. Jean, who is
speaking here tonight on health edu-
cation, "when a student who is not In
good physical condition will not be
graduated from a university.
"Higher institutions have been
graduating %tudents, even medical
students, who are not in good physi-
cal condition themselves. The schools
have been taking care of the students
when they are ill, but they are just
awakening to the necessity for
creating in them a desire for health
and teaching them how to obtain it.
"In health work of late years the
emphasis has been shifted from cure
to prevention," Miss Jean explained.
"In the golden age of Greece, the
physical level was the 'highest the
world has known. We have every-
thing that they had, and much more,
especially in respect to knowledge.
In fact, knowledge has far exceeded
practice.
"It is the aim now to put this
knowledge into practice. One might
say, though, that the Greeks had one
thing which we have not: the high
ideal of health. They had a respect
for the beauty of the body, and educa-
ted their children to have it. Another
aim, then, is to give this ideal to our
young people by exemplifying the
athlete,"''
The athlete, Miss Jean thinks, is
the nearest approach we make to the
standard of the Greeks. Her aim is
to teach the child by making phyiscal
perfection seem delightful, to em.-
phasize what one should do, and not
what one shouldn't do.
MISS JEAN TO TALK
ON HEALTHTONIGHT
First of Regular Series of Letures3
To Be Given During the
Summer Session!
VAUGHN SPEAKS JULY 7
Miss Sally L. Jean of New Yorkf
City will speak at 8 o'clock tonight inE
Natural Science auditorium on "ChildE
Hygiene." In her talk, Miss Jeanc
will discuss the history and future of
public health education, especially as
they relate to children.1
Child health organization is thee
work with which 'Miss Jean is now
connected. She was at one time a
specialist In the United States bureau
of health. Hen work includes lec-
tures and the planning of health edu-
cation programs.-
Miss Jean is sailing next week for
Edinburgh, where she will conduct
the school health section in the con-
ference of the World Federation as-
sociation. This is the second world
conference of this organization, the
first having been held in San Fran-
cisco in 1923.
This lecture is one of the series
on the Summer session program given
by the department of public health
education. These are held {on Tues-
days and Thursdays, the next one
being given July'7, with Dr. H. F.
Vaughan, commissioner of health in
Detroit, as the speaker.
SOCIETY ESTABLISHES
HIGHWAY IFELLOWSHIP

Frank Tannenbaum, travelor
thor, and student of social pro
spoke at 5 o'clock yestarday
noop in the Natural Science au
ium upon "The Meaning of the
ican Revolution."
Mr. Tennenbaum said that the
of the Mexican agrarian labor o
ization, because of its base in 1
social foundations, is the only
for the future of Mexico. In M
there are but two organization
claim the loyalty of the peo
the army, and the labor organiza
Aiming as the bandit leaders
personal aggrandizement, or, at :
advantages for their own fcllo
they can be expected to do littl
Mexico as a whole.
The labor organization then w
according to Mr. Tnnenbaum, ai
return the soldier to peace tim
cupations upon the farm, whic'
done constructive work towar
educational system for Mexico,
which; under Obregon, has given
ico peace for the first time i
history since the invasion of
white man, holds the only- ho>
there can be any hope, for, Mexi
The speaker said that the av
American fals to understand
ico properly because he fails to
preciate the conditions which
there and because of certain fu
mental differences between the
tory of the United States.
In describing the present day
ditions in Mexico Mr. Tannenl
said that approximately seven
Cent of the peopl4 have posses
of the land. Because of impure
er supply and general unsanita
health conditions are distinctly
favorable. Although 15 percen
the population may be said to be
erate, the little education which
common people have had has
no difference in their capacity
live.
At an earlier point in his add
Mr. Tannenbaum outlined the dil
ences in history between Mexico
the United States which Ameri
should understand. In the nort
part of the North American coftt
the white'man, coming in. large n
bere, found comparatively few
civilized native Indians. These
white man'killed that he might 1
his kome and retain his institut
customs, and ideals.
But in Mexico only a few wI
comparatively, entered the cou
and found many indians, a large
of whom were highly civilized. '
white men came as adventurers
gold seekers. They robbed the I
of his land and enslaved him.
cause the Indian was allowed to
and because the weight given I
customs by the larger numbers,
(has eve- since been a struggle
tween the cultures of the white
and the Indian.
Mr. Tannenbaum said that the
ican revolution began when the
man landed in Mexico. Some t
have never submitted to the ru
the foreigner. The Indian has
attempting to gain cultural eq
,with the white man, as he has p
al. equality; and to satisfy his
hunger.
The remarkable feature of the
ation in Mexico, he declared,
been the spiritual come-back o:
Indian.

INDIANS

OPP

Emphasizes lstorical I
Mexican and Amern
velopment

4MERICAN LEAGUE
; 0, 4; Cleveland 11, 1.
uis 8; Chicago 6.
ork 11; Boston 8.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
'ork 6 .10: Philadelphia

4, 7.

THURSDAY
5:00-Bacon Bat at Palmer field.
7:00-Men's Educational club meets
in room 318, Union,
Tokyo, July 1.-J. V. A. Mac Mur-
ray, new American minister to China,?

New York, July 1.- Seventy-four
of the candidates who tried the recent
examinations for certified public ac.
countant registration, conducted in 25
states, succeeded in passing, accord-
ing to the American Institute of Ac-
countants which prepared the exam-
niatidn. There were 430 candidates
of whom 59 were conditioned and 297
failed.
The largest number of successful
candidates was in Indiana, with Cali-
fornia second and Texas third

The W.A.A. and the womens' phy-
sical education department are hold-
ing a bacon bat this afternoon at 5
o'clock at Palmer Field for all sum-
mer women students. The program
will include baseball games and
stunts. All women planning to at-
tend are requested to sign up in Bar-
hour gymnasium by this noon. A
charge of $ .20 will be made for the
supper, collected at the field.

In order to provide for an investi-
gation relative to the utilization of
blast furnace slag in the construction
and maintenance of roads and pave-
meAts, the National Slag association
has recently established a fellowship
in the highway engineering depart-
ment. The investigation will be un-
der the direction of the division of
highway engineering and highway
transport.
The National Slag association fel-
low will make extensive research in
the laboratry dealing with the prop-
erties of slag and the results of its
utilization in the construction of dif-
ferent kinds of roads and pavements

I'
Y
r i
1
>;

Moscow, July 1. -The Soviel
terday announced plans for the
plete rehabilitation of the tele
system throughout Russia in ac
ance with American standards.

Rome July 1.-The we(
Princess Mafalda and F
of Hesse, whose engagen
f nounced June 18, is expe

1a

here Monday on his way to

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