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July 08, 1924 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1924-07-08

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rummer

THE WEATHER
SHOWERS
TODAY

tAIL. -
l

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XV. No. 15

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 8, 1924

PRICE FIVE CENTS

PRESiDENT'S SON
NEAR DEATH AS
SIXTEEN YEAR OLD CALVIN COO-
LIDGE JR. SLOWLY LOSES
STRENGTH
PHYSICIANS POWERLESS
AGAINST POISONINGI

Asserts Women's
Peace Societies
Are "Red" Tools

"0 M -

Father And Mother At Bedside
Boy Sinks; Hope Lost After
Relapse

As

Clements Librar
Notable His
For students of the summer session,
who are new to the University one of
the most pleasant and profitable of
the buildings to be visited on the cam-
pus is the William L. Clement's lib-
rary. The library, opened for use
last year, was built for the University
by Regent William L. Clements to
house his remarkable collection of
American Historical documents and it
is today one of the outstanding librar-
ies of the country, not only because
of the value and rarity of the books
possessed, butabcause it marks a great,
forward step in the movement to facil-
itate the scientific study of history.
Acting as a convenient and well-equ-
ipped repository for course material
invaluable to the American historian
it has immensely added to the prestige!
and credit of the University.
The collection in the library includes
books which date back as far as the
13th and 14th centuries and which1
seem at first glance to bear little
direct relation to American history.1
But so complete is the collection that
even volumes which first mention the
hope cherished by ancient EuropeanI
geographers that an undiscovered re-
gion of importance might lie on this
side of the world, are owned by the1
library.I
The most interesting of the very

Washington, July 7.-(By AP)-An-
nouncement was made at the Walter
Reed Hospital at 6:30 tonight that Cal-
vin Coolidge Jr., youngest son of the
President had taken a sharp turn for
the worst.
For some time, fears of such a de-
velopment had been felt and the
President and Mrs. Coolidge had not
left the hospital for dinner. The re-
port was the most serious which yet
had come from the sick room. A sink-
ing spell it was said had occurred
which every effort was made to check
through the use of restoratives and
stimulants.
The spark of life was still in the
boy at 7:30 o'clock it was announced
that he was partly conscious under
a flow of oxygen.
Physicians worked over him while
the President and Mrs. Coolidge were
at the bedside.
Scarcely any hope, however, was
held out for his revival.
At 7:55 o'clock tonight, it was an-
nounced that Calvin Coolidge Jr. was
dying.
Forty minutes after announcement
had been made that he was dying no
further word had come from the sick
room. Twenty minutes later there
was still no or,
Niehaus Featured
In Faculty Series
The third faculty recital in the Fac-
ulty Concert series will be given on
Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock by Mr.
Julius Niehaus, bass, and Ava Comin-
Case, pianist.
Mr. Niehaus is a former student of
Mr. James Hamilton of the School of
Music, and is in Ann Arbor this sum-
mer to continue his studies.
The Program:
Sonata, Op. 7 ................. Grieg
Allegro
Andante
Alla Mehuetto
Molto Allegro
Ava Comin-Case
The Horn .................A.Flegier
In Questa Tomba Oscura .. Beethoven
Had A Horse, A Finer No One
Ever Saw ..............F. Kerbay
Mr. Niehaus
Five Miniatures..........Palmgren
The Sea
May-Night
The Dragon-fly
Berceuse
The Swan
Polonaise .................MacDowell
Ava Comin-Case
Shipmates 0' Mine .......Sanderson
Trade Winds ...................Keel
Rolling Down To Rio........German
Mr. Niehaus
Mr. Harry Russell Evans accompan-
ist.
Buenois Aires, July 7.- A Havas
despatch from Rio Janerio this morn-
ing says a telegram has been received
here from Sao Paulo to the effectthat
the insurrection has been. supressed
and order restored.
Washtenaw avenue section of M-17,
which has been closed for some time
for paving work, will be opened for
traffic by the end of this week.
AND NOW,
considering that the shooting
is over, suppose we get down
to business. Business, and
more business result from con-
sistent use of Daily Classi-
fieds.
Do drop up and
SEE

JIMMIE, JR.
THE AD TAKER
Press Bldg. Maynard St.

Brig. Gen. Albert J. Bowley, com-
mandant of Ft. Bragg, N. C., is creat-
ing a stir on a lecture trip on which
he is avowing that various women's
organizations formed to prevent war,
are tools in the hands of Communist
representatives of Soviet Russia.
BISHOP APPOINTED
ON LIBRARY BOARD

University
of New

Librarian Named Member
Commission of Library
Association

WILL INVESTIGATE ADULT
EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES
William W. Bishop, University li-
brarian, has ijen named a member
of the commission on the library and
adult education by the executive com-
mittee of the American Library asso-
ciation. Other members of the com-
mission are: Judson T. Jennings, Se-
attle Public library; Charles F. Bold-
en, Boston Public library; Matthew
S, Dudgeon, Milwaukee Public library;
Miss Linda A. Eastman, Cleveland
Public library; W. O. Carson, inspect-
or of public libraries, Ontario depart-
ment of education, Toronto; and Chas.
E. Rush, Indianapolis Public library.
Beginning New Service
This marks the beginning of a new
kind of educational library service.
Libraries have developed excellent
lending departments for the reader
of popular books and splendid refer-
ence service for the person seeking
definiae facts or desiring to undertake
research. The object now is to de-
velop special departments for the aid
of ambitious adults and boys and girls
out of school who want to study in-
dependently. Thousands of older boys
and girls and men and women prob-
ably would continue their education
voluntarily if they could get at the
library the time, attention and encour-
agement of competent educational as-
sistants and if the library could pro-
vide an adequae supply of books to
meet their needs promptly, the asso-
ciation believes.
Lead to Self Education
An investigation is to be made of
the more important adult educational
activities in this country and abroad,
including university extension and
correspondence courses, and an inten-
sive first-hand study of the adult edu-
cational service of university, public
and special services. Funds for the
study have been provided by the Car-
negie corporation of New York, in-
udinganappropriation for the pub-
lishing of reading courses.
This project which may lead to en-
tirely new methods of self-education,
was discussed at a special sesion of
the annual conference of the American
Library association at Saratoga
Springs, N. Y.
Kalamazoo, July 7.-W. A. Blake,
92, eleced to the state legislature in
1890 and believed to be the oldest
Mason in Michigan, died at his home
in Galesburg.

SHULL DISCUSSES
IMMIGRATION LAW
Considers Question From Biological
Viewpoint: Urges Stricter
Selection
PREJUDICES AGAINST EASTERN
PEOPLES WITHOUT BASIS
Of decided interest was the lec-
ture given by Prof. A. Franklin Shull
in the auditorium of the Natural Sci-
ence building yesterday at 5:00 on the
subject of Heredity and Immigration.
According to Professor Shull there
are two important phases to the prob-
lem of immigration, those being ec-
onomic and biological. Nearly all dis-
cussions and arguments have been
based on the economic phase. The
other side of the question is of equal
importance.
The principal problem in immi-
gration must be met when the immi-
grants are of very different stock than
the people with which they must be
fused. Intermarriage and fusion of
the races is bound to occur sooner or
later. One of the great questions
confronting the biologist at this point
is whether or not this fusion is des-
irable. According to Professor Shull
it is impossible to determine this ques-
tion under existing conditions.
There has .been a change in the
source of immigration in the last fifty
years. Formerly most of our immi-
grants came from the northern coun-
tries of Europe but since 1880 the
number of the southeastern countries
has been increasing yearly. There is
wide spread prejudice ugainst the
peoples of these countries but this
prejudice has not been founded on
fact.
Selection of immigrants, according
to Professor Shull, should be made on
a family basis-on the heredity of the
individual-not by arbitrary selection
of a certain number of immigrants
from each country. This selection
should be made before the candidate
is allowed to leave his own country,
thereby preventing such situations as
are impossible as long asElls Is-
land continues to exist.
PUBLIC HEALTH LECTURE
POSTPONED TO JULY 11
"Public Health from the Interna-
tional Standpoint" a lecture which
was to have been delivered last night
by Hugh S. Cumming, Surgeon Gener-
al of the Public Health, in the Natural
Science Auditorium has been postpon-
ed to next Friday evening, July 11th,
in the same place.
Dr. Hugh S. Cummings, Surgeon
General of the United States Public
Health Service, is a noted authority
in this field, which is becoming in-
creasingly important in the industries
of today.

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t
9

y Contains
torical Collection
early works touching on America is
probably that of Martin Waldeseemul-
ler, a teacher of geography with the
revival of learning, who published in
1507 his "Cosmographiae Introductio".
or "Introduction to Geography", in
which he suggested that the new con-
tinent be called "America", honoring
Americus Vespuccius. His suggest-
ion, later considered unfair to Colum-
but, the first discoverer, was taken up
by other European writers, and the
new continent thus received a per-
manent name. Of the "Introductio",
with its important contribution to
our history, the library contains two
copies.
The period of exploration in the 15-
th and 16th centuries stimulated intel-
lectual progress on the continent and
an amazing amount of history and des-
cription was written, of which the lib-
rary owns many rare volumes. Among
the earliest books of collected nar-
ratives of travel was that published by
Master Henricd " Vicentino and his
son, Zamaria, in the Italian city of
Vicentia. This dealt with the voyages
of several explorers, as Vasco da
Gama, Columbus, Corte Real, and Ves-
puccius. The library's copy of the
first issue of the first edition, now
unusually rare, is the Beckford copy,
(Continued on Page Four)
EXPLAINS INCREASE
IN ENROLLMENT
Increase In School of Education Is
512 Percent In Three Years; Pres-
ent Record Is 425
RESULT OF NEW ATTITUDE
AMONG EDUCATORS'
More than 512 per cent is the in-o
crease in summer enrollment in the1
School of Education shown by figures
in the annual reports of the Univer-
sity. The schol was founded onlyI
three years ago; since then its grow-
th has been steady and very rapid.
During the summer of 1921 te num-
ber of students taking courses in the
department was 83; in 1922 it rose1
to 227; in 1923, to 315. To date rec-'
ords for 1924 show a registration of1
425.
Dean A. S. Whitney says that twoE
reasons will account for the mountingI
enrollment in the department. I
In particular, public health nursingi
has only been recognized this June'
by University authorities as a teach-
ing proposition. Since then, because1
practically all such work is done in
schools and must be most effective-
ly accomplished with a knowledge of
educational problems, public healthl
nurses have been placed in that
school. Registrations for the public'
health course total 54 at present. I
Further increase is the result of a
new and prevailing attitude among
educators everywhere. The high de-
gree of professiona consciousness,
manifested in schoolmasters' clubs
and intra-state associations for theI
unifying and raising of standards,
has served during the last few years
to awaken interest in educational
methods.
With this fundamental realization
underlying the work being encouraged
as -well as that being done by teach-
ers, principals and superintendents
during the summer months, even
greater numbers of students of edu-

cation may fairly be expected here in
coming years.
HESTER ON CANADIAN
OLYMPIC TRAC.K TEAM
George B. Hester, Detroit, a mem-
ber of the Michigan Freshman track
team this year has been chosen a
member of the Canadian Olympic
team, according to word that has
reached Coach Charles Hoyt here.
Hester went to the Canadian tryouts
at the close of the school year here,
and twice ran the 100 metre dash in
:10.4 seconds.
Hester's succes in making the Can-
adian squad brings the total of Michi.
gan track men up to three, James
Broker and DeHart Hubbard being
the other two.

Costumed Monologue Interprets
Impersonates Character Of
Abraham Lincoln

I

Chester C. Platt of Wisconsin, nom-
inator of Robert M. LaFollettee for
President, in the Conference for Pro-
gressive Political Action, in Cleve-
land.
LINCGOLN CASWELL
TO PRESENT HERO

Nominator Of
La Follette In
3rd Party Meet

MCADOO FORCES
TOUCH NEW LOW
r MARK IN VOTES
WILSON'S SON-IN-LAW SUFFERS
UNDER SMITH ATTACK;
TOTALS 380 1-2
LOW RECORD REACHED
AS DEADLOCK HOLDS
Smith Close With 355 Votes; Ralston
of Indiana Takes
Big Jump
Madison Square Garden, July 7.-
(By AP)-Further inroads were made
on the McAdoo strength during the
85 ballot reducing it to a new low rec-
ord. On that ballott the leaders stood:
McAdoo, 380 1-2, Smith, 363, Ralston,
87, Davis, 68, Glass 67 1-2.
Madison Square Gardens, New York,
July 7.-(By AP)-Launching a night
attack ondthe McAdoo line, the Smith
forces and their co-belligerents at to-
night's session of the Democratic con-
vention hammered Mr. McAdoo's bal-
lot to a new low record, the lowest
point it has touched since the open-
ing of the convention. At the same
time, the maneuver raised Senator
Ralston of Indiana to a new position.
At the end of the 84 ballot, the re-
sults stood: McAdoo, 388 1-2, Smith
355, Ralston, 86, Glass 72 1-2, Davis,
56, Underwood, 40 1-2, Robinson, 25,
Ritchie, 15 1-2, Walsh 1 1-2, Salis-
bury, 6, Owen, 20, Bryan, 6 1-2, Roose-
velt, 1, Coyne, 1, total 1096. Absent 2.
Poll. SCIENCE SCHOOL'
ENTERTINMENT PLANNED,
Entertainment for those attending
the Political Science School, July 21-
26, will -begin with a luncheon, the
26, at the Michigan Union. This lun-
cheon is primarily for the students but
members of the League of Women Vot-
ers who wish to attend may do so by
notifying Mrs. Warfield, 1842-J on or
before the preceding Saturday.
Speeches of welcome will be made
by Mrs. Miller, state president, Mrs.
May Wood Simons, chairman, Miss
Rittenhouse, and Dean Kraus.
The students will also be entertain-
ed at a tea to be iven by Mrs. Patter-
son, 2101 Hill St., Monday afternoon.
Those who can house delegates dur-
ing the school, please call Miss Helen
Bellock, 1328 Washtenaw.

And

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NO RESERVED SEATS; TICKETS
50c ON SALE AT BOOKSTORES
Mr. Lincoln Caswell, the famous
"Lincoln Impersonator" will give an
impersonation of the martyred presi-
dent, his personal ideal at 8 o'clock
tonight in University Hall under the
auspices of the classes in Play Pro-
duction and Interpretative reading of
the Public Speaking department.
The entertainment consists of a
costumed monologue written by Mr.
Caswell, whose program has devel-
oped from his love of that character
for whom he was named by a father
whose interest centered in Abraham
Lincoln, and whose strongest desire
was that his son be like him. To this
end, Mr. Lincoln Caswell's life has
been devoted, and his time has been
largely spent in research to find the
true nature of this national figure.
The results call to mind Hawthorne's
story of Ernest and the Great Stone
Face, for the rewards are quite simil-
ar in the two cases.
Three acts have been selected to
show the representative characteris-
tics. The first occurs in the summer
of 1862, in Mr. Lincoln's office in the
White House, where the President is
receiving visitors and holding inter-
views. iThe second presents the fam-
ous War Cabinet at the time of the
signing of the Proclamation of Eman-
cipation. The third shows the events
of the discouraging summer of 1864,
two years later.
Much interest has been expressed
as to Mr. Caswell's selection of these
scenes which are strongly reminiscent
of Drinkwater's play. Critics who
have witnessed previous performances
of the recital are unanimous in their
praises.
Tickets which are fifty cents are on
sale at any of the State St. book
stores and at the door. There are no
reserved seats.
CRIMINOLOGY CLASS TRIP
PLANNEDTO DETROIT
Professor A. E. Wood of the Sociol-
ogy department of the university will
take his class in criminology to visit
the Detroitlouse of Correction, on
Friday, July 10th
Similar institutions of this sort will,
be visited from time to time during
the summer by students interested in
the study of criminology. In this way
the members of the coure have an
opportunity to study the subject more
intensively than they would in the
class-room.
The observation to the Detroit
House of Correction on Friday, will
be the first trip of the. summer for
the class.

WIIA f'S GOING ON
TUESDAY
5:00-Evolution in the Bible. Prof. W.
R. Humphreys, Natural Science au-
ditorium.
7:00-Choral Union rehearsal, School
of Music.
8:00-Recital- Lincoln - Character
Study and Impersonation, Mr. Lin-
coln Caswell of New York City, au-
ditorium of University hall. Admis-
sion will be charged.
WEDNESDAY
1:00-Excursion No. 4. Bel1e Isle and
the Detroit River. An afternoon's
outing at this famous playground;
botanical gardens, zoo, pavilions, la-
goons, and wooded drives. Ferry
to Belle Isle and return from Wood-
ward avenue. Trip ends at 6:30 p.
m.
5:00-- Geographical Observations in
the Great Desert of Peru and Chile.
(Illustrated). Dr. P. E. James, Na-
tural Science auditorium.
8:00-Concert - Mr. Julius Neihaus,
bass; Mrs. Ava Comin-Case, piano,
under the auspices of the University
School of Music. Hill auditorium.
8:15-Visitors' night at the Observa-
tory. Admission by ticket only.
THURSDAY
3:00-Marionette show-Conducted by
Mr. F. G. Brown and Mr. R. B.
Henderson; under the auspices of
the Women's League, Mimes thea-
ter. Admission will be charged.
7:00-Choral Union rehearsal-School
of Music.
8:15-Visitors' Night at the Obesrva-
tory. Admission by ticket only,

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