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August 08, 1923 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-08

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...._. _

a Arun

'ery morning except Monday
miner. session.
:e Associated Press. The As-I
is: exclusively entitled to the
ication of all news dispatches
or not otherwise credited in
the local news published here.

ered at the postoffice, Ann Arbor,
gan, as second class matter,
scription by carrier or mail, $t.50.
ces: Ann Arbor Press Building,
munnications, if signed as evidence of
faith, will be published in The Summer
at the discretion of the Editor. Un
I communications -will receive no con-
iun. The signature may be omitted in
ation if desired by the writet. The
er Daily doe not necessarily endorse
niiments expressed in the communica'
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones 2414 and 176-M
MANAING EDITOR
HOWARD A. DONAHUE
Mitor ............William Stoneman
ials ................Paul I, Einstein
Editors..............Nathan Davis
Robert G, Ramisay.
Assistants
rdHeidemann Ada Phelps
ret Geddes Andrew E. Propper'
IIeraper Regina Reichan
biy Mitts Margaret Stuart
a Moran Lucy Tolhurst
Boyer Matilda Rosenfeld
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
4 BEAUMONT PARKS
tising................Hiel M. 'Rockwell
ation .................D. L. Pierce
ats ...........A. S. Morton
ation............ .John C. Haskin
Assistants
eth, Bartholomew George Stracke
rine S. Griffiths John A Barrett
rEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1923,
it Editor-NATHAN 'M. DAVIS
THAT FATAL URGE
st individuals have a hard time

some time. So many things seem to
enter into our judgment -of someone
who is speaking to us; the way he
stands, or the way he smiles, or the
cut of his clothes, and design o his
tie-so many outward signs infiuente
us in a speaker that at times his.
words are forgotten.
Speaking into a radio microphone
is no doubt a great lesson. The speak-
er on the one hand must learn to put
across words and rely on nothing but
what he says to hold his audience;
those who listen, on the other hasd,
must learn to judge what is said with-
out the help of embellishments to in-
fluence and persuade.
There are still some places in this
world which remain free from the de-
vices of modern communication. One
Summer session student who was
spending the day on hils grandfather's
farm didn't hear of the President's
death until Friday fight.
If the city council doesn't make up
its mind soon, they'll be too late to
have- the, proceedings of their meetings,
printed in either the Times News or
the Post. .
It's impossible to find a quiet place
on the campus now, with Alfred the
Great's successor chasing all about the
campus.
YESTERDAY
BSMY'THE
In Washington
In Washington, the machinery of
government was silent yesterday while
the capitol city waited to. pay its last
tribute to the memory of Warren G.
Harding. drowds collected, hours be-
fore the train was expected and the
silent watchers gathered in every
place of vantage on the way.

"France must decide whether she re-
quires a Germany industrially able to
pay reparations, or a crushed" and
bankrupt power hel4 down by force."
This is first hand, from one who saw
cQnditions as they exist today. We
should advise, France to decide soon,
ere It is too late.
CLASSIC
- EXERPTS
ULYSSES AND THE CYCLOPS
A Cyclops stern caught in a cave
Ulysses and his sailor crew,
And on them daily fietcherized
Partaking of them two by two.
His subway orifice would yawn
As far as is the North from South:
Despite that threat the Ithacan
Was never seen down in the mouth.
And though ere this for years and
years
He'd breakfasted on smaller fry,
It seemed that now his stomach had
An endless horror vacul.
The cave was e'en for sheep a stall.
Odysseus set his wits to steep:
He thought the giant he might blind'
And then escape beneath a sheep.r
And so he whittled long a branch
Until his arm seemed out of joint:
He took the sharp'ning' as a joke,
But Cyclops couldn't see the point.
Straight through the monocle the
branch
He thrust and Cyclops gasped for
breath.
He twirled and twirled and twirled
and twirled
Till Cyclops seemed quite bored to
death

Text Books and Supplies for All 'Colleges
GRAHAM'S-Both Ends of the Diagonal

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genius of the age is in the discovery
of preventions; and w'hy not one for
war, one which will flash out of some
ind and remake the world? The
difficulty is that a remedy must be ap--
plied to a cause. The plan can foresee
with precision only the effect. The
effect of war, but what mind now can
say what the causes will be? What
plan could have prevented the Amer-
ican civil war? With definite knowl-
edge of .the trouble, which a plan for
the future cannot have, the north and
the south tried for years to avoid their
fate and in the end found no way. The
south was going out of the union and
the north would not permit it.
Many wars, even the recent great
one, were preceded by earnest efforts
to find a way out. These efforts were
based upon revealed facts and knowl-
edge of the exact points of danger.
The plan would be a formula for an
unknown situation, for unknown
moods and unknown desires.
Two nations which 50 years from
now would be guided by a war pre-
vention formula prepared now, no
matter what the issue between them,
would be in such a sedate frame of
mind that no war between them would
be possible.
Humanity has outgrown many prac-
tices and conceivably many outgrow
war, but that will be by evolution and
not contrivance.

SUPERFLUOUS
FACIAL HAIRS
Removed Permanently by
ELECTROLYSIS
Electro-Cosmetic Service
224 Nickel's Arcade

1i

farmers & Mechanic
Dank
-TWO OFFICES
101-1053 . Main St. 330 S. State
Nickel's Arcade

I

VISIT historic
-:- to her cravern -:
CHICAGO AND MOf1ROE PIK ES
Gath'ay to Irish Hills
CHICKEN DINNER ::ETC

-4 - -.--!-R
A, L AST TIMPS TODfAY",- J9

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How Late Should A Decent Party.

Keep?

SCOTT FITZGERALD said
"The Father of a Modern Girl
Should Be a Night Watchman"
HERE IS A DELIGHTFULLY TOLD-STORY OF TWO
H DDEN ROMANCES ILLUSTRATING AN
INTERESTING BIT OF REAL LIFE

Not a preachment
on moral conduct
but a really roman-
tic entertainment.

d

. I

Find that lost pin through the clas-
sified Ad" will find it 'for you.-Adv.

MARJORIE DAW
NOAH BEERY
MARGUE ITE

D"Wandering
I~l noht11Il

lng whether they are sports or
s when they do something they
t want to do just because-some-
said, "Oh, comne on, be a. sport. c
finds the taskdoubly hard after
a starting to do it because one9
think of at least a dozen ways in9
ch the request might have beens
ified, but strangely enough is at aE
to remember in a similar situa-t
what the striking retort shouldF
e been.. The one sentence, "Be a
-t,' 'has turned countless numbers
self-respecting individuals into{
k and. vocillating minions.Y
ith this plea, Cain probably got'
his spepding money;'as have al-1
t all its kindred after him. ItI
Id be interesting to know whatl
.m thought of being a sport con-
ed in, and if he did not fall for it,c
he answered his temptor. Nev-
teless, very few people i can with-
id a desire. to appear a good fel-;
and be a sport in the eyes of oth-+
and so the boy smokes his firsto
tasting cigarette and the first air-+
n arises to the sky with the thought,
t to do otherwise would brand him
being a poor sport. *
'here are two kinds of fools, those
o are willing to appear as such
her than do something they do not
ire, and those who are willing to
fools without appearing as such.
a of the hardest blows to an ordin-
individual with the normal amount
conceit, is that of being condemned
one's fellow beings. Of course if
s phrase "being a sport". were an-
zed and studied it would serve one
t slightly, depending on the inter-
tation of a "sport," but otherwise
has a hypnotic appeal which is
ely ever resisted.
he duty then of all those who have
interests of mankind at heart and.
each one who desires to do a monu-
ntal work whose significance would
t through the ages, should be to
ent or coin a phrase with as much
eal and which will counteract ef-
tively, the urge to be a sport.

Also in Washington; President Cool-
idge was kept busy from early morn-
ing until late at night receiving a
constant stream of government offic-
lals and party leaders in his head-
quarters at the Willard hotel. Con-
gressional leaders and other notables
arrived in large numbers for confer-
ences by which the new chief execu-
tive will be, prepared to. actively as-
sume charge of the government.
The world eannot pause. Warren
G. Harding is far away fi'om it all
now and even while we bury our last
President, we cast anxious eyes to-
ward the new man.. It is expected that
in the main, Calvin Coolidge will fol-
low the policies of President Hard-
ing. Coolidge -isasaid to be even more
of a party ngan than was Harding and;
his policies will most likely achieve
harmony in the Republican ranks.
Moreover he is said to be a staunch
conservative and a man of courage
and conviction. No one can complain
of the new President's present line of;
action-he isnot talking much but do-
ing a lot of listening, which is al-
ways a sensible thing tO do in a new
situation:

But still he merely lost his eye
And missed a prize on which to sup,
Yet this was penalty enough
Foi one who was so much stuck up.

Get good values cheap, thru
Classified columns.-Adv.

the

Blind Cyclops when he wished his
sheep
To free would roll a stone away
And stroke them as they passed him
by
To greet the light of dawning day.

HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS AND
PRINCIPALS
See the display of elementary,
High School and College text
books on display on the first
floor of Tappan Hall.
Miss Florence Storms, '23, is
in charge of the display.
PUBLISHED BY
THE WORLD PUBLISHING CO.
Hour-9-Io, I-4.
- Voonvention 1iote. l

de IMOTTE
REGINALD DENNY
OFTHE POPULAR SERIES OF "LEATHERI

.G1 7 II

IN ANEW ONE
PUSHERS"

- .-.-....-.-

So shrewd Ulysses got a ram
And hung beneath his wool af gray,
And thus reclining 'neath the sheep
Inspired this Olyssean lay.
Now in this dire predicament
Although for help the cave he scan-
nedk,
The ram performed no hostile act:
He felt himself quite undermanned.
The ram's essays some wool to pull
About Ulysses' eyes increased,
And yet in spite of all attempts,
It was the wether that was fleeced.
Ulysses clinging to the wool
Still trying hard his fate to shape,
Beneath the ram thus got away,
A sheepish method of escape.
Now this the moral I would. draw:
When clouds about your life do form,
Just think how Cyclops lowered and
roared,
And how Ulysses 'wethered the storm.'
ARISTOPHANES.

nr Jo1J~hr~m
You can always get good
company to join you.
DiinkOk
~De c uscnd efreishino,

THE BOBBED HAIR
HAS GOT TO GO
Latest in hair goods for
dressing-up the bob.
Finest quality three sep-
arate stem switches $5.00
Stoddard Hair Shoppe
707 N. University Phone 2652

4

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"The Hell, Cauldron of a War"
A deputation of British labor lead-
ers recently: completed a survey of.
the Ruhr situation for the Interna-
tional and Political Department of the
Transport and General Workers' Un-
ion and in their report made pubdic
yesterday gave the most distressing
explanation of the aggravating situa-
tion yet received in this country. Mr.
Ben Tillett, M.P., who headed the in-
vestigation, expressed the gravity of
the situation in calling the occupied
region over which France and - Bel-
gium are exercising unwarranted priv-
#leges -of control "the hell cauldron of
a new and terrible war."

Ago-

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EDITORIAL COMMENT

11

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WHEN WVARS ARE NOT

JUST TALKING
ave you ever spokes into radid
rophone? Those who have had the
ortunity say that it is a novel ex-
Lence. Radio speakers stand up
're an instr!ument and speak,-
; speak. There are no elocutionary
tures, no friendly smiles to indi-
e applause or restless moving to
of failure. There can be no falter-
and coughing for the delicate in-
iment. will pick up the faintest of
spers. Appearance counts for ab-
Itely nothing, the speaker may ap-
r with his hair unkempt, tie askew,
da in pockets and coatless. The
for need not worry about facing his
Bence or directing his voice to all
ts of the hall; he has no means of
ging the personality of his audi-
e; and he cannot estimalte the
nbers of his listeners. The only

Deploring the unnecessary idleness
of German industry, he continues.
"The Ruhr which might be the world's
entrepot of trade, is now in sullen idle-
ness while the soldier turns guns that,
are lethal and lustful for blood on a
valley which should be the humming
hive of industry, but which is now a
place of death and desolation." With
the depressing influence'of such ia con-
dition in one of Europe's most pro-
ductive localities, all of the continent,
not to mention -the British Isles, is
under the 'strain of sunted production.
and the accompanying unemployment
situation. The great German factor-
ies and transportation systems, results
of their genius for organization, are
being manipulated little enough, and
even then, mainly by the French who
"have had to use crowbars and brute
strength, not understanding the elec-
tric brains of the system."
The fruit of German invention is be-"
ing left to rot while the French would
have their coffers filled by gold marks
that can only be tmassed if these great
industrial-machines are put into oper-
. .: . . .i . 1.. .. . .

(Chicago Daily Tribune)
Edward Bok offers $100,000 for a
plan which will prevent war, and a
great many people are restimulated in
a belief that there is, hidden in some
one's -mind, a plan which can be dis-
covered. The world prog'resses by
research and invention. Small-pox is
checked by vaccination, in spite of the
anti-vaccinationists. Once it was .a
plague. Now it is an incident.
Relief from typhoid, diabetes, the
hook worm, diphtheria, etc., comes out
of the laboratory, Mr. Bok follows the
theory of progress. Something may
'be discovered to check the boll weevil.
A new way may be found of capturing
energy. Man already can utilize sound
waves.
Then why not a plan to prevent
war? Cannot the human mind, which
some day will find a cure for cancer,
find also a cure for war? All that is
needed, people believe, is an idea, an
invention, a formula, a scheme, a sys-
tem. Modern people do not like war
as the Goths, Huns, Mongols, and our
own Iroquois seemed to like it. They
liked it because it did pay if success-
ful. The.uns had a pleasanter time
in a rich conquered city than they
had on their plains. It was worth
the effort. We doubt that it pays now
except as an escape ;from something

Careful Finishing
that Protects your
Negatives
We feel a real respon-
sibility for film left
with us for development.
Negatives cannot be re-
placed, and there rare
often several exposures in
each roll that are inval-
uable to the owner. Care-
ful methods and sclentific
formulae bring results
that justify your entrust-
ing your films to our
finishing department.
Of course we are
equipped for enlarging-
let us show you some
samples of our work.

Daily.E I rlb to
PUT -IN-BAY-
C One Round Trip $ .25 Sundays
0c Way (Return sme Day) Holidays
Leaves Dpi-et-Dily-9a. us. (E. T.)~
The finest exclusive excursion steamer, the Put-in-Bay, noted for
its large ballroom, makes this trip a memorable one. Orchestra and
dancing aboard,without extra charge. Cafeteria aboard.
Four hours crammed with outdoor pleasures at Put-in-Bay-bathing-dancing-
gives for lunching and athletic fields. See the wonderful Caves, and Perry's
historicmonument.
Connections at Put-In-Bay with steamers for Cleveland, Toledo and Lakeside.
Daily to Sandusky
The PatoIn-Bay make the run through to Sandusky evetyfday. Fare-$1.50
one way.
Special Friday Excursions to Cedar Point
A special emcursion is made every Fridayto Cedar Point-the fresh water rival
to Atlantic City-the finest bathing beech in the world-large summer hotels,
eos, and outdoor amusements. Four hours at Cedar Point ad seven
hurs at Put-in-Bey! Leaving Cedar Point at S m. and- Put-in-Bay at 7 p. m.;
frtriwback in Detroit 1:30p. m. Fare-Cedar Point. $1.50 round trip;Nt-in-
Bay, 80 cents.
DencinaMoohaWrite for Map Folder
Leaves Detroit 8:45 p.- .Ashley&Dustin
Fare, W Thurs. 60e. at,A hly&D ti
sun. andlrolids ic. f " Steamer Line
Foot of First Stree
Detrolt, Mich.

t

Kadak Film in all size.

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LUNON & COMPAOT
, 11N. Uiversi

.e
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