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August 08, 1923 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-08

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I'll

Al\L~ UV
TODAY

%'V4144
.fir
it i!3ant

J~Iaitli

,.J L/# J
PRI

DAY AND MIGHT
SERVICE

No. 40

ANN.. ARBOR, MICE IGAN, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 192"3

'V

PRICE FIVE C

f -a .,
k

t

! WILL HOLD
lOIN S SERICE[S
10AY AFTERNOONi
ITE WILL BE PAID DEAD
CHIEF BY CITY AD~
UNIVERSITY
)TO GIVE SHORT
ECH ON DEAD CHIEF
s Establishments to Close For
rHours Serice; Services at
Hill1 Auditorium

PR ESIDENT COOLIDGE, AT HIS DESI4IFTUfN MEWDDN
WiEARS MOURNING FORHARDING IULIIIIU I1III
j" +vr ________.^t {," TR AIN ARRIVING IN CAPITAL
... .... . .N

he Universty =and the city of Ann
or will °unite in tribute to the
nry of .WarrenG. Harding in a
norial service #Friday afternoon,
4111 auditorium, the exact time of
bh will be announced in a procla-
ion by.,Mayor George E. Lewis to-
row motbring.
:ayor, Lewis stated last night tat
le he 'expectedl that the time would
yet at 3 o'clock, it was dee'med ad-
sbe to await the publication of
proclamation' by Governor Alex-
r Groesbeck before the city proc-
406in was given out, in order that
"e would be no conflicting provis-
iUversity to Close.
be University will suspend all ac-
4es on Friday from 1 until 6 o'-
k and-busiiiess establishments will
losed from 1 until 56''cock. From
hour, that the services begni n-
ye minutes after the hour a per-
of "silence and prayer wll be o-
'ed throughout the, city. Durng
period the bell of the churches
ughout the city will be tolled.
e services will open wIti the
ling of President Calvin Coolidge's
lamation by Mayor Lewis. Judge
ge E9. Sample, who will preside
the serices, 'will then call upon
E. R. Sayles, pastor of the First I
1st church, who will read selected
tural passages, 23 Psalm, Micah,
chapter, 8th verse,followed by
ayer.
e of the late President's favor-
hymns ',.Lead..Kindly .Light" ,will
;be 'sung', by. a soloist Prof.
nas H. Reed, of the political
ice department,. will, deliver a
t address on Presdent Harding.
e services will -close with the
ing of "America" by the congre-
n, benediction by Rev. E. C Stell-
of the Zion Evangelical Luther-
.hurch and the sounding of taps.
rding to Dean Edward H. Kaus
.e Summer session, who is a menm
of the civic and University com-
ee in charge of arrangements, the
xrm has been .so arranged that
ill not last more than ani hour.
3 American flag hung across the
of the stage and 6 picture of
ren G. Harding draped with crepe
placed i£n view of the congrega-
will Abe emblematic of the spirit
iEt Services.
Lectures Postponed
[, activities in the University, fin-
[ng the conference on the Social
aces in Public schools scheduled
o'clock and the lecture by R. C.
sy, on "The 'Origin of Man" at
clocok will be cancelled. These
events will be postponed until
lay at the same hours.
joint .committee composed of fac-
.men and business men is in
ige of arrangements, undr the
rmanship of Mayor Lewis.
Browns Release Fohl
;. Louis, Aug. 7.-Lee Poh has
released as manager of the St.
it Americans, it was announced
today; .
CANDIJA IME
Do you want to rent you
rooms ?' .Maty ,students
are securing rooms now
for fall-rent yours ntow .
and 'do it easily.. Just

PI DELTAt KAPPA TO HOLD
OUTING~ AT .WHi101RE TODAY
Members of Phi Delta Kappa fra-.
ternity wil holdl their annual outing at W i m r a e 'li f e n o ,a
o'clock, Baseball will, be playedl dur-
ing the afternoon and in the evening
a steak supper' will be served. Mr.
Frank Pickell; of the. School of lEd-
ucation, will be the principle speaker.
JO0HN S-ON ALS T
Over 200 Attenid Aimnal Get -Togetherr
Feast, Sponsored by1
Ed. Clubs!
COIFFEY STl4ESSES',IDEALS FOR
MICHIGAN EDUCATION IN TA LK

. rte . . -~ ,. .a +rr..w. ..jrr, :,.
This photo- of Coolidge was taken as lie disposed of some vital matters at his desk in the vice-president's room
In the Caitol0 August . He will, utilize. this office, with his hotel rooms, for some weeks. Note tho mouirn-
band ion° his left sleeve., a
'Th first official act performed by ,Calvin Coolidge, as 30th :President of the United States was to 'Issue a'
proclamation setting aside Friday, August 10, as a national day of mourning for President Harding., Until Pres-
ident Harding' is buried the new executive plans to handle only such official business as cannot wait. In addition
to the temiporary "White House'" quarters he is "occupying at the New Willard hotel, Coolidge will utilize his old
office 'in the Captiol until the Coolidges, move into the real White House and the Presidential office in theCaptiol
is in shape for occupation..

HISTORY PROFESSOR SPEAS O N°
RECENT EXPERIENCES
ON TRIP r
'TELLS OF TWALK WITH,
GHANDI, REYOLUTIONIST!

'"Maliraas in India Are
Side," Stays Speaker;
Picturesque

on British
Ghandi,

in the winter months of 1920-21 and
here he was, given" every opportunity
by the British °to study the situation
at. first hand., Going there upon the'
invitation of Sir .Alexander Frederick
White, who had been appointed pres-
ident of the new legislative assembly
which was formed with 'the hope -of
giving India some measure of self-I
4 goement, "every door in India was
oeeIto him" as his' host Sir -Alex-
ander has promised him. "My friend,"3
Prof. Van Tyne rstated, "said that
there was in India the most unique
political situatoin ever known; the
British government attempting to give
to the 320,000,000 of India two fifths of
'all" the population of the world, self
.government, and that immense mass
'of; people in a state of unrest such
as has seldom troubled them in their
history, led by the most unique figure
in modern.. history, Mahatma Ghandi,
who probably has the greatest follow-)
ing that any one has 'ever had during
heis' life, and the greatest influence in
the 'world today."
Tell of Ghandi
Ibis} meeting with Ghandi, and his
conversation with thae leader of the
revolt ina India, formed perhaps the
most interesitng. chapter of his talk.
"M.Vahatma Ghandi," Professor Van
Tyne declared, "position is that of a
religious man, he ,says 'himself that
he Is a religious man, he bases, all
his ideas upon 'religion." Professor.

GUIE OLERNE
Yost, Little, W1ieiu n, Starzenegger,
Vieck, Barker ancd Hoyt to Coach
Next Fallf
TWO NEW MEN ARE ADDED:-
TO PER.SONNEL OF STAFF
Michigan destinies in football this
fall will, be in charge of 7 varsity,
coaches, 'all but two of them whom
have helped in putting out a. fighting
Wolverine team for some years past.
Coach Fisher, and one =assistant will
handle the reserves while Coach Math-
er wil again break in the Freshmen'
with the help of- five assistants.
This makes a total of 15 men, the
largest number ever empoyed at Mich-
igan on the football coaching staff.'
Fielding H. Yost who for 22, years
has been head coach of -Michigan foot-
ball, will again take the reigns this
fall while Assistant Director George
Little, Tad Wieiha, E. 3. Sturzeneg-
ger, Ernie Vick, Dick Barker and
Chuck Hoyt xill assist in coaching
the squad.}
Barker and Hoyt are new comners

In a lecture filled with many in-
teresting reminiscences of his, recent
experiences in, India, wvhile he was
there studying the political, social and
racial. problems of India, Professor
Claude H. Van Tyne of the history
department piophesied the ultimatel
success of the small group of honest!
Englishmen in India who are .attempt-1
ing to give the count'ry self govern-
ment. In speaking of the situation
in India, the speaker said, "The Brit-
ish government is tryingf to bring self
government to 320,000,000 of people
who dwvell in a country of 12,000
small, and poor villages, the huts are
of mud and thatched 'roofs, the people
live in the most simple manner,, a
simplicity that is beyond the ?concep-
tion of our minds. 400,000 of these
people can read any language, over
a, milion can read' and write Eng-
lish, and it is here that' the unrest
lies. Those who' have read of Burke.,
of Pitt and Fox, of the great liberal
movements that have swept the West,.
desire- to give some measure of these
democratic Institutions to growing In-
dia. All. generous minds want them
to have it,". the speak;er continued,
"but the question that faces th e Eng-
Tishmian is how soon he can let them
go, and when they can govern them-
selves without falling into the hands
of self seeking politicians who will
exploit the riches of this richest of
countries'. There are differences in
religion, 'in caste, and in- race that
will ultimatey be solved if an honest
group of Englishmen now striving for
it can accomplish it wthout interfer-
ence."

Over 200 attendedthe annual ban-
quet held at thes Unionl last ncght,
given the Sammer session students
of the School of - Education under the
auspices of the Men's and 'Women's
Educational clubs, and Dr. M. S. Pitt-
man, , Rrofessor of education at the
Ypsilanti normal gchool was.the toast-
master for the eening. ~State Sup-
erintendent of Schools Johnosn was
principal speaker of the .e ening. He
discussed the primary school bill
which has reently been passed. He
also spoke of the enthusiastic coop-
eration given him by all the educa-
tors of Michigan. - 9
Miss Elsiel, Travis, e-superntend-
ent in Arizona, gave a short address
on "Professionalism in "Teaching",
which was followed by a brief'- tall
6y W. L. Coffey deputy' state school-
commissioner who stressed *ideals for,
Michigan education.
Because of the absence 'of ,Dean
C Whitney of the School.- of Education
his speech was read by Prof. C. 0
Davris of the Education depatahxent
and following this, a letter from him
to those present at the banquet in
which he praised the work done In
education and spoke of the growth- of
the, School of 'Education from the
time it was instituted until the pres-
ent.
Several musical 'numbers were on
th e program. The session closed with
the singing of the Yellow and the
Blue by the 'entire group.
PROOUGTIDN CLASS 'ILL
PRESENT PROGRAMTOA
IProf. R. D. T. Hollister's classes is
Iay production and play direction will
1peet a series of one-act plays to-
night at 8 o'clock in University Hall.
This series of plays together with
"The Importance of Being Earnest"
to be given tomorrow night will be .
the only program given by the classes
in public.
The plays and casts are the follow-
ing:
"Thursday Evening" by Christophere
Morely. Director, Wiliam P. Sand-
ford. Laura Johns, Mrs. Vet Nebel;
Gordon Johns, P. H. Jackson; Mrs.j
Sheffield, (Laura's mother Mrs. Ruth
McPhai; Mrs. Johns (Gordo's nmoth--
er) Edith M. Charrington.
Ia Cast of "The Exchange" l
"The Exschange", by Althea Thurs-
ton. Drector Mary H. Tisher. Imp,
Mary Alice Scott; Judge, Henry C.
Kingbeil; Poor Man-Ellis Aman-
trout; V~in Woman, 'Viola Rather; 1
Rich Man, Nathan N. Schlafer.s
"The Groove" by -George Middleton.
Rirector, Clarence M. H-unter. Sarah
Emnma . Leonard; Constance, MildredI
LaRue.
"Joint Owners 'in Spain" by Alicet
Brown. Director, , Thelma Dawson.
Mrs. Mitchell, director of Old' Ladies't
home, Mrs. Gunberg Gray Inmates
of the.- honme: Mrs._ Fullerton, Jessie '
Werner; Miss Dyer, Lla Duff; Mrs. r
Blair, ;Golda, Zook - _ .s

PRESIDENT coOLIDGE mME
CORTEGE AT RAILWAY.
CROWD WAITS THR'O1
DAY FOR VIEW OF CA
diMrs. "Harding Gos Directly to N
Rouse; Train "Baksinto'
, Washington, Aug. of (By AlF
rPresident Harding's. funeral t
looming with the sorrow, f the
tion" arrived in}, Washington at 1
o'qelock tonight.
Although the train was nine h-
late thousands jammed the t
concourse 'waiting for hours pat
against the iron fence to gef a glfr
of the :dead chiftan. The train b
ed into the station "so that thej
eral car with its flag drapedca
rolled in first to stop where the I
group headed 'by President Cool
waited,
First 'in. the funeral carat Ail1
liant' glow of' the packed ' traina
was Secretary Christian and Dr. S
yer'-on the back platform. There,
no noises in the station but the th
Bing. of the air brakes oail dis
engine..
Mrs. Harding stepped off" the
leaning on: Seretry hristians' "
and with Dr.k Sawyer on her o
side.. The bandin the concourse
gan playing "Nearer My Gd to T
Mrs. Harding walkced'direct, ut'si
ly ,along the station' platform, w
her hand was 'on 'Secretary-Chisti;
arm, she, apparently needed no s
port.,
A mxilitary guard of honor that "
spread about the casket all the'~
from ' San Francisco also aligh
Members of the paty said Mrs.Ha
ing had stood the trip well. "As
,olemn 'strains of the band filled
station, the caket was tendlerly.i
down' throuxgh the special, door cu
the side of the car. It was placed
a rolling platform."
A single wreath tht hdbeen *
ing at the station 'was laid on the gi,
flag spread "over the caskt. The j
itaryguard resumed its place ab
the casket.-The unfrmed wen rai
their burden and began moving si
ly toward the double rank of an
commissioned officers who fored
corridor before the 'President's ro
"' Mrs. Harding, reaching the W].
-Ho6use at 10:45 just as her husban
body was being taken into the Pr
dent's room at the station., She wa
ed Into the house unaided.
As the body was lifted to the1
draped gun caisson, the pocess
began up Pennsylvania avenue, wail
was dim in the subdued; glow off
tall and dark. buildings, almost
serte - with few lighted windows.
black sky 'studdedi with 'a few ,s
that looked dim an far away ab4
Flags of the high buildings were
visible in their half-mast group in
all but windless air. :

Van Tyne had the opportunity to meet!I to Michigan, however, both men have
this leader during the meeting of the been in attendance at all athletic
All India National Congress, the rad- courses in the Summer school and
ical element of the" country. JHereI have assisted in the practical wvork.
wvere gathered 10,000 leaders of Ini- I-Hoyt is the successor to Archie Hahn,
dia, from Mahrajahs to the poorest I former football trainer and assistant
men who came together to rule. backfield coach'xwho has signed with
"Ghandi", the speaker wvent on,, "is Princeton for next year. 'Barker will
the recipient of the greatest. enthus- i act as- assistant football and head
iasna tlat any, man ever commanded { restling coach.
from his fellowv beings . I have seen 3
Roosevelt cheered to the echaobyRea din-~ Claxss
American audiences, but - there is
nothing like the wild enthusiasm of Presents Recital
the Indian for Ghiandi. They adore'
him as a God, a saint." Professor Despite the downpour which fell
Van Tyne with his escort, one of the in the. early part of the evening, the
most influential of Indian merchants recital which was given by the class
wvent to the tent-, of Ghandi, and therej in Interpretative reading was well at-
wvaited for him. "We talked with oth- - tended. The class, which has been
er men who were waiting for him," under the direction of Prof. Louis Eich
Professor Van Tyne said, "when sud- of the public speaking department.
denly there was a great shout from showed the results of long and care-
the thousands of people ouside. We f ill training by their supervisor., The
went to the door of the tent, and there! audience laughed with, Stephen Lea-
in a narrow aisle between the tens cock, in his description of the house-
of thousands of Indians, caine thisI keeping Man, they shuddered at the
saint, this seer, this reincarnation' of death of the beautiful Minnehaha,
1 (Continued on Page Three) 1~ "Hiawatha's Laughing Water"..-

'KIRKLAND TO SPEAK ON
"ART F PHOTOPLAY"
i David Kirkland, of Los Angeles, well
' known nmoving picture director; will
speak on "Thae Art of the Photo-Play"
before Professor Brumm's class in
written criticism this morning at 9
j o'clock, in room 207, University hall.
The le6cture will be open to the pub-
Mr. Kirkland has directed Constance
Talmnadge in heru more conspicuous
succesgses, including "The Perfect Wo-
'man," "The Love Expert," "The Tem-
peramental Wtiife," and "In Search of
a Sinner." Hle-was also the co-au-
th'or and co-director of "Reported
Missing," in which Owen Moore play-
ed the leading role. Mr. Kirkland has
just completed "The Barefoot Boy," an
adaptation of the poem by John Green-
leaf Whittier. He has also written
the scenarios for "At the Sign of the
Jack O'Lantern," and -"A Spinner in
the Sun," both by Myrtle Reed, and

CALL
JIMVMIE
An' 'VAi

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