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August 04, 1923 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-04

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l

CAIN AVL

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
- SUMMER SESSION
Published every morning except Monday
during the summer session.
Memb er of the Assciat ed Pess. he 'As
s iated Press is excusivol ' entitled to the
use for republiiation of a news dispatches
'redted. to it or not otherwise credited in
this paper ad the local news published here-
ptered at the pstoffce, A", Arbor,
Micigan, Wssecond class matter.
Swjbscription by carrier or mail, $.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
osuunications, if signed as evidence of
d faith, will be published in The Summer
dy at the discretion of the Editor. Un-
iged communications will receive no con.
-ide atiom Thesignature may be omitted in
blation if desired by the writer. Te
Summern Daily does not necessarily endorse
the sentiments expressed in the comraunica-
tions. -
EDITORIAL STAFF
;" Telephones 244 and 316-M '
MANAGING EDITOR
HOWARD A. IDONAHUE
City Editor............William Stoneman
Editorials........ .....Paul . Einstein
Night Editors.. ....Nathan Davis
Robert .Ramsy
Assistants
Richard Heidemann Ada Phelps.
Margaret Geddes AndrewE. Propper
H. C. Heraper Regina Reichman
Dornaoth ittsMargaret Sur
erena Mora ucyTolhurs
W. K. Boyer Matilda Rosenfeld.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 96o
BUSINESS MANAGER
a L BEAUMONT PARKS
Advetieing........Hiel M. Rockwell
blication...............D. L. Pierce
counts.. A.;S. Morton
Cizclatoii...........John C. Baskin
-┬░Assat Elizabethx Bartholomew Geore Strake
Catherine S. Griffiths John Barrett,
SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1923
Night Editor-W. H. STONEMAN
WARREN GAMAMIEL HARDInt
THE AMERCAN
A nation today mourns the passing
of its leader. The American people
bow their heads in heartfelt grief
over the loss of a noble President."
With the departure of W* rren Gai-e
aliel H rding from this life, the coun-
try, yes, the world, loses one of its
finest' characters. Essentially a man
of the people, loving simplicity and
detesting the pomp and -display of au-
thority, the late executive's life is as
a great American epic, thd history of
one who, as an Anmerican; typified the
highest aims and ideals of life.
Sincerity motivated his every word
and deed, as a youth, as a novice in
the field of politics, and as the pilot
of a nation.' One never had to guess
what was in his mind. He spoke it.
A wholehearted desire to serve the
public in his utmost capacity promted
the late President at the outset. of
his term to formlate his task as chief
executive as follows:
"My whole job as President will be,
first ,to get the people of the United
States together in better understand-
ing, and then to get the nations of
the world to a friendlier understanding
of a workable world league." He
spared no effort in carrying out this
program and the memory of his high
deal and tireless work in its behalf
will survive when all of us are long
ince in our graves..
No public official ever administered
hls duties with greater consideration
f or more perfect discimination in
;he interests ,of his pe~ple. On every
>ccasion he preached the doctrine of
A.mericanism, . but at no time lost
view of our moral obligation to lend
assistance to the world at large. His
nterest in establishingr, permanent
veace throughout the world will be

ong remembered through the Accom-
plishments of the Conference on the
Limitations 'of Armaments, the first
irect move toward destroying the mil-
taristic tendencies of all the great
dowers. Could he have survived, there
s no doubt but what the able states-
nan would have taken an active part
n re-establishing the world in a sys-
em of genuine co-operation and un-
lerstanding.
The President passed out of this
ife while on a mission of national
oncern. His trip to Alaska was the
inal service which he rendered for
-is country; he died in action.
President Harding will go down in
tistory as a great representative of
unqualified Americanism, as a loyal
nd sincere supporter of the United
tates of America. In this moment of
ational bereavement we pay homage
o one who lived and loved for his
ountry above all, OUR PRESIDENT.
EXAMS AND CRAMMING
Final examinations in the universi-
les are much cussed and discussed.
Uany uphold the old institution and
>thers are bitter in their denounce-
uent of it. Thursday the schedule for
he final examinations in the Sum-
aer session, appeared and many drew

1 -
"Boning," or "cramming" is very
often a successful process. It is easy
to let things ride along and then db
some intensive-head ┬░ rk three days
before the reckoning. And oce this
process succeeds, it 'b ome ah bit.
Out in the world it is impossible
to let matters slide along and then
mke up by a few days of feverish
memory work. Out in the world there
are no final examinations; the' ex-
aminations come every day.
The French didn't know what to ex-
pect after their reply to Britain and
they certainly got fooled. Even the
British themselves did, for after all
of Premier Baldwin's drastic threats
he controll'ed himelf so miraculously
before parliament that no hint of 'a
break was made. That Is British di-
plomacy; they , can avert. a crisis
even when" it is present.
The cold blooded Englishman ex-
presses his bereavement with the his-
toric phrase, "The King is Dead! Long
Live the King!" This makes our
blood run cold and still the daily pa-
pers appear in the second .edition aft-
er the President's demise with the
headlines, "Coolidge is President."
The first contingent of Summer ses-
sion students has departed, and only
two more weeks for the rest of us.
Some are glad but more are sorry.
YESTERDAY
I By SMYTH E
Harding-The Host and-Friend
The geniality which is characteristic
of all small town characters nade
President Harding one of the most
likeable and' approachable men .ever
to occupy the White House. His pol-
icy of receiving a 'maximum. number of
visitors and entertaining the young-
sters of the capital on the grounds of
the executive mansion gained him the
personal devotion of the entire -city.
The conservative seclusion whi h Wil-
son maintained during ' his adminis-
tration was never missed, and when
the "small town folk"fmoved in, all
the gaiety of' former :years. was re-
sumed. Frlendiships, not: official ac-
quaintances, made Washington life a
real pleasure to the Hardings who
broke away fro mthe traditional stiff-
ness of forimer administrations. . They
held a perpetual open house, and' tiot
a presidential "court."
An Accompllshment of
Harding's Last'Days
Less. than a month since: the begin-
ning of correspondence betwen Presi-
dent Harding 'and Judge Gary, who
promised the late executive that he
would exert his every effort in bring-
ing about complete abolition of the 12
hour day in the iron and steel indus-
tries, plans have been formulated for
the i'mmediate inauguration of a new
plan, Thie deceased Artesident had
tried ever since his election, to get
rid of long working hours for these
laborers, and on the day of his death
the anticipated action wan finally tak.
en. Here is but one example of the
work which the mourned leader did
for his people.
The plan provides for an eight hour
working day with a 25 per cent in-1
crease in wages. This action is based
on the assumption that there will be
an increase in available labor short-'
ly. Elimination of the 12 hour day
in these two industries marks the com-
plete passing of old traditions in long
hour labor.1

The New Presidentl
In the midst of a great wave of sor-
row which has swept the nation, Cal-
vin Coolidge, fromer Vice-President of
the United tSates, has 'become the
chief executive of this country. Aft-.
er resting in apparent seclusion as
far as public concern goes, since his
nomination in 1920, the new President1
assumes the leadership of this great
nation, having taken the oath of of-
fice- before his father in the family
farm house near a small Vermont
village. Without any ceremony except'
the swearing of the constitutional1
oath, the 30th President stepped into
office. The simplicity of American
government would be complete if such
a lack of pomp were always the rule.
President Coolidge is te 'second1
man in the history of this country
whose father has had the pleasure of'
'witnessing his son attain the highest
honor in the realm of American states-
manship. In this case, the father him-
self administered the oath of office.
Dr. George T. Harding, who now is{
grief stricken over the death of his
son, is the only other man who has
seen his son in the office of President.
Listeners Given Life arm
Dussendorf, Aug. 3.-(By A.P.)--Up

EDITORIALCOMMENT
.NO INCONSISTENCY
(Detroit Free Press)
A member of the British parliament
has dug back into the correspondence
between the United States and Spain
during President Buchanan's admin-
istration for the purpose of finding a
precedent set by the United States in
support of the proposition that this
'country ought not to interfere with
stocks of liquor on board British ships
in American harbors.
The period selected was a good one
for the United States was utterly out
of patience with Spain at that time
over disputes growing out of the rights
of. American shipping. The- Black
Warrior case in which an American
,hip had been seized and condeml
for 'a trivial violation of port regula-
tions was still unsettled. Mgy Am-
ericans believed that the seizure of
Cuba was the .only way to end the
trouble' The President, In a more
moderate frame of mind, only sug-
gested that the United States buy the
Island. If at the time somebody rep-
resenting the United States had gone
a little further than the law allowed
in insisting upon the rights of Amer-
ican ships in Cuban waters It would
have been no great wonder.
However, the case cited in parlia-
ment shows that the secretary of state
kept his head. He admitted that Spain
had a right to prescribe the conditions
under which foreign ships might en-
ter Spanish waters, and that is all
this government claims in the liquor
cases, but he suggested that port rules
in Cuba ought to conform to general
usages and that changes In the rules
imposing unusual conditions should
be preceeded- by reasonable notice.
The American rule about liquor stock
is, indeed,. unusual, but nobody will
claim the prohibition l1aw was im-
posed without giving -everybody am-
ple time in which to comply with it.
It. therefore appears again that the
United States is keeping within the
law that it'.has laid down for others,
'and that if the v4xatious qgaestions
r:elating to liquor on foreign ships are
settled, it must come about through
changes inithe rules legally made and
promulgated,.
kA HOME FOR ACTORS
(New York Times)
"Make their residence homelike and
comfortable," reads the will of the late
Percy 0. Williams, providing for a
home for aged ,actors. "The residents
ofV the home shall be deemed and re-
tferred to as its guests. * * * Provide in
the home a suitable library and divers
means of recreation. Furnish lec-
tures, readings and entertainments to
which the guests shall have free ac-
cess." Thus did Mr. Williams hope to
lighten in a measure the burden of
members of the dramatic profession
who in their old age have no refuge.
It is a fine aspiration, to which will
be devoted the better part of Mr. Wil-
liams' fortune. His estate at River-
head, on Long Island, will, after the
death of his widow, be devoted to car-
rying out this purpose, so that those
who are to be his "guests" will live in
the house which during his life was
his own home.
To some of the residents in the Ac-
tors' Fund Home at New Brighton, on
Staten Island, Mr. Williams left per-
sonal bequests. This organization,
founded 20 years ago by members of
the profession and supported by them,
has long been the principal place of its

kind for retired actors. The Williams
'bequest,'when finally acted upon, will
therefore be a new recourse for them.
In these days of vast movie salaries
even the most successful actors on the
legitimate stage earn what to many
seems but a precarious living. In few
professions are there so many ups and
"downs, such freaks of fortune and of
public favor. Those who are highly
paid too often forget that the wheel.
which is so pleasantly turning for
them' may suddenly stop or be revers-
ed, and they fail to make adequate pro-
vision, for the future. It does not fall
to many persons to die before the foot-
lights, to carry on, as did Sarah Bern-
hardt, until the end.
For those who never earned star
salaries and for- those whose life work
keptk them long on the road or for
many seasons away from the town
which they called home not only are
there not many chances to lay aside
for rainy days, but also there are few
opportunities to make or keep a home.
Their dreams of retirement are mar-
red by the haunting fear of dependr.
ence. For such the home bequeathei
by Mr. Williams may prove a blessing.
The fortunate one who- enter it will
have the companionship of their, own
people, sharing with them memories'rof
the "good old days." In an atmos-
phere like that, as "guests" of their
old friend, Percy. Williams, theyowill
be able to end their' days with dignity

'I L..tg l gyg AL SI1. 1' JAL I

Text Books and Supplies for All Colleges
GRAHAM'S-Both Ends of the Diagonal

DETROIT UNITED LINES
ANN ARBOR TIME TABLE'
Eastern Standard Time
(Effective July 30, 1923).
Limited aAn Express Cars to Detroit
--6:oo. a m., 7:00 a.m.,, 8:qo a.m., y9;o5
a.m. and hourly until 9:o5 p.m.
Limited Cars to Jackson- 847 a.m.,
10:47 a.m., 12:47 p.mn, 2:47 p.m.,, 4:47
p m., 6:47 p.m., 8:47 p.m.
Express Cars to Jackson (Local stops
west. of Ann Arbor)--9 :47 a.m. and
every two hours until 9:47 p.m.
Local Cars to Detroit-7 :a0 a~m.,
8 :5 a m. and every two hours until
8 pm., ii :oo p.m. To Ypsilanti
Only-.-xI:4o p.m., 1: t5 a.m.
Local Cars to Jackson--7:so a.m.
and then 412: io. a.m.'
Connection made at Ypsilanti to
Salinevand at Wayne to Plymouth and
Northville.

GARRICK MAThS.t.s '25-50c
341h Annual Season Nights 25-5-75c-$l
THE BO :STELLE CO.
In Richard Walton Tully's
"TheE ird of Paradise"
NEXT' WEEK-- SIX-CYIINDER LOVE"

SUPERFLUOU
FACIAL H
Removod PermaneR
iaLi2. kROcLYS
Electro- Cosmetic
221 Nickel's Are

Exceptionally Good Values in this sale of

SUMMER HATS
New Fall Hats just arrived

a

,.

I

, PUYEAR & HINTZ
328 South Main

HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS AND
PRINCIPALS
See the display of elementary,
High School and College text
books on display on the first
floor of Tappan Hall.
Miss Florence Storms, '23, is
in charge of the display.
PUBISHE$D BY
TH E WORLD PUILISIHIN CO
Hours-9-o, 3-4.
FO O D always tastes
much better if the
surroundings are right.
There is no pleasanter
place in Ann Arbor in
which to eat than
fT"W 'W'WV'W~ifr ' Z ?_ ? Y'

I

*- ' -

WHITE ' SWgA N LAUNDRY
Lqunoderers, Cleaners

4:

Dyers, Pressers

a mu
e 33

Cents' Sits ; . . $1.25
Ladies' Suits......$1.50 p

ONE DAY SERVICE ON REQUEST
IPHO NE 16 l
S limtt latit mt1 tC1m11IMI imil 111111111111mm i1m ii l

TUTTLEY.SLLUNCH
ROOM
MAYNARD STREET

FINE STATIONERY FOR
COLLE.E STUDENTS
Instead of paying a big price: for
blank stationery, send us your name
and address and we will send you a
free ,sample of Milo Name and Ad-
dress Stationery.
It sells at $1.00 per box of 75 en-
velope's with 75 double sheets to
match. The paper is beautiful-
Linen Finish-and .on each envelope
and sheet of writing paper we print
your name 'and address in :rich blue.
In fact, it's a $3.00 value for $1.00.
It's a wonderful quality and costs
leess than you have been paying for
blank paper.
Milo Name and Address Stationery
will please you,. Write' for free sam-
ple today. Address Westlake Station-
ery Co., 120 North Erie Street, Toledo,
Ohio.

LAST TI
PEP AND P1
JOHN N
-~L'

MES

TODAY

vNCH GALOR]
Y HINES
IN

I=

HIS LATEST AND GREATEST, WITH

'I

E

The Store of Service

ORANGE Blossoms
have held the

ROBERT EDESON C
HARRY FRASER.P
VIOLET MERSI
ALSO
"SPEE Dc
A New Century C
ITS COOL AT THE
:itttittt 2tt ~ t u tttti~rti
i lliiiiilliilllfliiiilliillill

HARLIE MURRAY
OLLY MORAN
EREAU
3UGS"
omedy.
E MAJESTIC

place of

honor at

weddings for a long,
time. Modern in-
genuty and industry
have combined- the
symbols,-of "the wed-
ding ring and the
orange blossom in
shoe beautiful rings
which we are selling.
They are the genu-
ire Traub Bros. Ori
a nge Blossom -rings
We have a new ship-
19ment of Gruen Veri-
Thin Watches.
11

Daily Excursion to

;.,PU-T-IN-B Y
B O0C One Round Trip $ .25 Sundays
Way (Return Same Day) Holidays
Leaves Detroit Daily 9 a. M. (E. 7.)
The Pxest exclusive excursion steamer, the Put-in-Bay, noted for
a re ballroomsmakesthis trip a memorable one. Orchestra and
-4nw4n aboard, without.extra charge. Cafeteria aboard.
79n busprme with outdoos pleasures at Put-in-Bay-bathing-dancing-
'a tt unchg and athiletic felds. See the wonderful Caves, and Pery's
nmonument.
Coieptio-a at Put-In-Bay with steamers for Clevelan4, Toledo and Lakeside.
Dally to Sandusky
IU Put-ln-By nak th. run 'throgh to Sandusky everyday. Fare- $1.50
one way.
Specil Friday Excursionts to Cedar Point
A s elexcrsion is made every Frida to Cedar Point-the fresh water rival
to tic City-the finest athibahin the world-large summer hotels,
Seacad all outdoor amusempents. Four hours at Cedar Point and seven
hu at Nt-In-Bayl Leaving CedarPoint at 5 p. m. and Put-in-Bay at 7 p. in.;
. back inDetroit 10:30p. . Fare-Cedar Point, $1.50 round trip; Put-in-
Bs; Ocret.

If

Arthur H. Arnold
State Street Jewelry
302 S. State

y

Deeding UoomIgts
LeavesDetroit 845 p.i;.
laWd Ta. 0.
spa. and H .idaS,7C.

Write for Map Folder
Ashley & Dustin
Steamer Line
Foot of First Street
DetroIt, M

- .,~
~ ~9Nq~~,@

U-

The Store of Service

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