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August 04, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-04

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I

kTI

MODERATE WITH
LIGHT SHOWERS

EFr i!3

' at1L,

ASSOCIATI
PRESS

DAY AND NIGHT WI
SERTICE

_:_ _ ,

XIV. No. 37

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1923-

PRICE

EBECOMES PE

ARDING

TO

LIE

IN

STATE

AT CAPITAL;

,
x
',,,
'

WILL

BE

MADE

AT

MARIO

..r.

N EWEXEC UTIVE,
REACHES CAPITAL
LA TE LAST NIGHT
'AKES UP OFFICIAL DUTIES
IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING
ARRIVAL
ENTRANCE INTO CITY
LACKING IN DISPLAY

PRESIDENT COOLIDGE AND "FIRST LADY OF. THE

--rr-

l

LAND"Of
lSTARTS LONG 1
ACROSS CONTIN
FOUR DAYS WILL BE CONE
IN RETURN JOURNEY
TO WASHINGTON

I

Washington
Body

Prepares
of Former
ident

to Receive
Pres.

E

Washington, Ag. 3-(By A.P.)-
The capitol of the United States
here today was planning to receive
its -dead *and welcome into its arms
the new scheme of things. Even be-
fore the departure from San Fran-
cisco of the funeral train which sym-
bolizes a nation's remembnance of,
President Harding, arrangements had
taken from here for such a ceremony
as will express in a measure a na-
tion's tribute to the kindly, gentle,
leadership of its President.
Coolidge Received Quietly
Official Washington enters into the,
legion with President Coolidge who
has come into the Presidency of his
country in figures already made not-
able by executive achievement. The
whole transition was made wisely and
without flourish or confusion. None
of the pomp and ceremony which
usually welcomed an incoming Presi-
dent toWashington ,awaited Mr. Cool-
idge on his arrival late tonight to
take up his new responsibilities. Ex-
cept for the demeanor. of officials and
the reading of dispatches from the
far away Pacific Coast, there was lit-
tle to show that one chief executive
had passed away and another had
taken, his place.
Coolidge-Hughes ."Confer
Throughout the day Secretary
Hughes, as ranking official of the gov-
ernment, present in the capitol, de-
voted himself almost entirey to the
preparation of final plans and data
.on urgentmatters of state to be laid
before the new President on his ar-
rival. The conference between them
was arranged to take place at the
New Willard hotel where Mr. Cool-
idge has lived as Vice-President and
(Continued on Page Four)
DAILY EXTRA FIRST TO
TELL 1OF HARDING DEATH

FUNERAL. SERVICES T
BE HELD WEDNESD,
Chief Executive's Body Will Be
to Rest in Marion
Thursday
San Francisco,, Aug. 3-(By
P.)-Rearrangement of the schi
dule of the funeral train bearin
the body of President Hardin
so as t'o bring it into Washin
ton~ next Tuesday .instead of We
nesday was announced today.
The new schedule will allo
funeral services to be held I
Washington in the capital rotun4
late Wednesday afternoon an
the services in Marion, Ohio, nex
Friday, which will be proclaim
ed a -day of national mourning
San Francisco, Aug. 3-(By A.P
An avenue of mourning stretched
night across a land of sorrow.
began near the golden gate and. en
at. the nation's capital and over
for four days and four nights
travel a funeral train bearing
body of President Harding.
San Francisco, Aug. 3-(By A
P.)-Mrs. Florence Harding, wi
dow of the late President, stand
ing between Mr. and Mrs. Georg
T. Christian, Jr., and the Rever
end James S. West read a praye
over her late husband's'bodyto.
day, nodded her head slightly a
the pastor raised his hand, an
said: "God is our refuge an
strength." As the Minister end
ed his prayer, Mrs. Harding said
"Amen"
The widow stood to watch hal:
a hundred persons as they file
out waiting for the room to clea
in order that she might have
few minutes alone with her dea
| before the body,-was taken to th
train for transportation to th
national capitol.

President Calvin S. Coolidge aiid Mrs. Coolidge
A new President and a ne w "first lady of the land" were create d overnight when, four hours after P resident Harding's death, Calvin S.
Coolidge took the oath of office, admin istered by his father at their family home in Plymouth, Vermont. Not only is the new President one of the most
respected men in political circles at the National capitol but Mrs. Coolidge is one of the most popular women in Washington society.

'1AN TYNE 10 SPEAK
ON ININPOLITICS
Will Tell His Experiences During Re-
cent Trip to In-
din
HISTORIAN HAS WRITTEN'
BOOK ON INDIAN SITUATION
On next Tuesday afternoon at 5
o'clock in the auditorium of the Na-
tural Science building, Prof. Claud H.
Van Tyne, of the history department,
will give a lecture on "Some Remin-
iscences of Indian Politics." Profes-
sor Van Tyne has been head of the

Life Of Mrs. Harding Is One
Of Continuous Struggles

With the Friday morning edition
of the Summer Michigan Daily already
on the press and the night staff pre-
paring to leave the office at 11:40
Thursday night, a sharp insistent
ring on the Associated Press Daily
wire brought the little group who
were already at the office door, hur-
rying back to the telegraph booth.
One of them lifted the receiver and
answered. "President Harding is
dead, here is the story," were thte
Vords that came over the w;.e and
tigan the night of newspaper making
all over again.
The press was stopped, foems re-
moved, and the linotype machines'
again beat their stacatto clicking..
Within an hour and fifty minutes from
the time that the message was re-
ceived a completely new Daily was on
the streets in the hands of newsboys.
The Daily extra told Ann Arbor read-

history department for many years,
and is regarded as one of the greatest
lauthoritles in his field. He is pres-
Ident of the Michigan Historical so-
ciety, and is a member of the Amer-
rican Historical society. In view of
his recent trip to India, what he has
to say will be of great importance.
This is the first time since his retur4
to the United States, that Professor
RVan Tyne has spoken on his expert-
:ences in India before a general Ann
Arbor audience.
In his recent trip to India he had
every opportunity to study the Indian
situation in very close personal way.
Going there upon the invitation of one
of the leading English statesmen of
India, he was enabled by the British
government to carry on his research
,work under the most favorable au-
spices. His close personal contact
with many of the famous leaders of#
the rebellion, among them being the
interesting revolutionist Ghandi, who!

The life story of Florence Kling
Harding is like an epic of sturdy Am-
erican womanhood. It is a chronicle
of constant struggle against great
odds and of continual accomplish-
ments. From" the day she first faced
the world in a pioneer home in the
Middle West until she undertook the
laborious duties df the White House,
her courageous spirit has been her
strength. She has triumphantly con-
quered her heavy responsibilities, and
her own ill health, and now she is
nobly bearing her heaviest cross, the
death of her 'husband.
Confident of President's Recovery
Mrs. Harding's devotion to her hus-
band is well known. She has ever
been the staunchest of his support-
ers and has contributed to his suc-
cess in no little measure. In his
final illness, Mrs. Harding was the
only one: who never despaired of his
recovery. President Harding rallied
to a seeming recovery and then the
sudden shock of his death was dealt
to the devoted wife.
Even at this crucial tifne Mrs. Hard-
ing's strength has not failed her. The
magnificent valor that had served her
so well before came to her aid. To
those who were alarmed for her con-
dition, she composedly announced that
she could bear this greatesttest. Im-
mediately her thoughts went beyond
herself to others.
Mrs. Harding was born in Marion,
Ohio, in 1860, of old pioneer stock.
She married Warren G. Harding in
1860, at a time when his prospects
did not seem very bright. He had just,
taken over the ownership of the Mar-
ion Star, when it was ,loaded down

with mortgages and still had to es-
tablish itself in he community. The.
little bride had never been accus.
tomed to extravagances, and she ip-
mediately turned to the task of help-
ing put the newspaper on a sound
basis. She went to work in the bust-
ness office, and was soon in charge
of advertising and circulation.
When her husband entered, politics,
she found new and unexpected ways
of helping him. As the wife of a sen-
ator she kept in touch with hundreds
in her state who wanted help in Wash-
ington, besides maintaining her place
in the capital.
Aided in Campaign
After President Harding's noniina-
tion, Mrs. Harding became, in spite of
the growing threat of physical col-
lapse, an - active figure in the front
porch campaign. Not only did she ap-
pear always with her husband when.
he faced a crowd, but she remained
beside him when the lines formed to
shake his hand and she gave a hand
clasp also to every one of the many
thousands who' filed past to acclaim
his candidacy.
For a time after she came into the
White House, Mrs. Harding continued
her close association with the details
of her husband's work. She visited
the executive offices, met every" em-
ployee and made more than one sug-
gestion for facilitating the public
busniss. Mrs- Harding revived the so-
cial calendar which had talmost been
forgotten during the war and the sub-
equent illness of President Wilson.
Her health and her growing social
duties called a halt to her strenuous
(Continued on Page Four)

statements given last
Summer Michigan Daily
"Loss Inesthnable"_
Regent Benjain S.
Grand Rapids, who has

UNIVERSITY MEN
Hanchett, Hinisdale and Springer,
Close Friends of Dead President,
Offer Heartfelt Condolences
REGENT. FACULTY MAN PRAISE
"UNPRETENTIOUS AMERICAN"
Prominent men of the state who are
closely connected with the University.
expressed their sorrow at the death
of President Harding yesterday in

night to the When the train, . draped in I
y. drew out of the black draped at
-Hanchett here tonight there began the sad
Nanchett, of transcontinental trip in the his
been for many of the nation. There have been

years a personal friend of Harding,
said: "The whole world is'shocked by-
the death of President Harding. The
loss to our country and our people
is inestimable.
"A great calamity lhas befallen that
can only be lightened by courageous-E
ly and faitfully pursuing the ex-I
pressed ideals and high purposes of
this great and good man who possess-
ed such a clear understanding of the
responsibilities of the high office in
which he was placed."by his.country-
men. . It was niny cherished privilege
to enjoy his personal friendship, and
it was always with increasing admira-
tion and affection that I left his pres-
ence when' opportunities of brief vis-
its were afforded me.
Interested in University
"At the time of my last interview
the President showed great interest in
the University'of Michigan, and hoped

eral trains bearing the bodies of c
executives 'of the Republic be
but no such train ever passed
so long a route. Ninety and one
hours will be required for the
and when it is ended at 1:30 Tuesi
the body of Warren G. Harding
rest a while in the White House w
he served the American people
nearly two and a half years and't
in the capital, where, as Senator
(Continued on Page Three)
BROTHER OF HARDING
f IS MICHIGAN ALUMNU

Dr . George Tryon I
brother of the late pres
a graduate of the Unive
Michigan. He was' gr
from the Medical school
and is now a nratoiinz

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